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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 6, 1991
GAZA CITY, Israeli-Occupied Gaza Strip -- There are different versions of what happened by the Nusairat refugee camp one recent night.Some say it all began with the kidnapping by Palestinian nationalists of a young Bedouin girl who belonged to the Abu Madain tribe, the largest and most powerful in Gaza. Others blame attempts that night by the Palestinian activists to interrogate the girl's cousin, whom -- like the girl -- they suspected of collaborating with the Israeli military occupation.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 8, 2005
DAHANIYA, Gaza Strip - For the past three decades, Salima Ermilat, a 50-year-old mother of seven, has inhabited a strange netherworld in the Middle East. Wedged between the borders of Israel, the Gaza Strip and Egypt, and surrounded on all sides by electric fencing and Israeli army checkpoints, her village of 400 Palestinians and Bedouin has been separated from much of the rest of the world, its residents fearful that if they leave they will be killed by Palestinians. Ermilat's village is better known to Israelis and Palestinians as the "village of collaborators," a haven and retirement home of sorts for Palestinians and Bedouin who secretly worked for Israel and who needed a secluded place to be safe, or even feel at home.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 1, 1994
RAHAT, Israel -- When the Israelis rounded up nomadic desert Bedouins and moved them into towns in the early 1950s, they submitted without a fight. Even when their Arab brethren in the occupied territories took to the streets in the six-year uprising of the intifada, Israel's Bedouins watched impassively from their towns.But when a Jewish settler machine-gunned a mosque full of praying Arabs on Friday in the West Bank town of Hebron, Bedouin resentment awakened.Not only have young men in a cluster of Bedouin towns thrown stones, overturned cars and set tires aflame for the past two days, they have also joined the casualty list of dissenters.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 2004
ARAQIB, Israel - Salim abu Medeghem bent to the parched earth and yanked up a crunchy tuft resembling straw - all that remained of his wheat crop, he said, after Israeli airplanes sprayed herbicide on the contested parcel. "This is burned," he said. "This is all burned." Abu Medeghem, 38, vowed to plant again in the fall, even if the Israeli government sends more planes. "This is my land," he said. The stubbly field is one front in an increasingly tense struggle over land between the Israeli government and thousands of Bedouin Arabs inhabiting a broad desert swath of southern Israel known as the Negev.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 1997
LAQIYA, Israel -- In the not-so-distant past of her ancient nomadic tribe, Amal El-Sana would have lived in a tent in the desert, and her role in life would have been fixed by restrictions as old as time.Lately, her Bedouin people have been gathered into modern villages. The tent has been replaced by cinder block. The camel has been replaced by the pickup truck. Children are going to school.But even so, Amal El-Sana is far ahead of most of her people.The petite, articulate 24-year-old has broken nearly every female stereotype of the Bedouin.
TRAVEL
By Story and photos by Lester A. Picker and Story and photos by Lester A. Picker,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2001
The ringing in my ears has finally stopped. Only now, for the first time since I arrived here 36 hours ago, can I hear the true sound of the great Sahara desert: silence. Utter, absolute, total quiet. In the desolate landscape of Egypt's Eastern Desert, part of the vast Sahara that stretches across much of northern Africa, there are no tree leaves to rustle in the wind. Most of the time there is no wind at all. Trees, like the acacia, are few and laced with thorns and rigid, needle-like leaves.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
A Memorable Place Lessons in life from a desert nomad By Elizabeth Atalay SPECIAL TO THE SUN Life lessons can come from the most surprising people and places. I learned this with my mother, who was perched atop a camel like the Queen of Sheba. She bobbed and wobbled with each of the camels' lurching steps, letting out squeals of delight and fear as we progressed deeper into the Negev desert in Israel. Our camel-trek leader, a local Bedouin named Razi, told me that my mother reminded him of his own mother.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 8, 2005
DAHANIYA, Gaza Strip - For the past three decades, Salima Ermilat, a 50-year-old mother of seven, has inhabited a strange netherworld in the Middle East. Wedged between the borders of Israel, the Gaza Strip and Egypt, and surrounded on all sides by electric fencing and Israeli army checkpoints, her village of 400 Palestinians and Bedouin has been separated from much of the rest of the world, its residents fearful that if they leave they will be killed by Palestinians. Ermilat's village is better known to Israelis and Palestinians as the "village of collaborators," a haven and retirement home of sorts for Palestinians and Bedouin who secretly worked for Israel and who needed a secluded place to be safe, or even feel at home.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 17, 2002
LONDON - Reading Europe's press, it is really reassuring to see how warmly Europeans have embraced President Bush's formulation that an "axis of evil" threatens world peace. There's only one small problem. Mr. Bush thinks the axis of evil is Iran, Iraq and North Korea, and the Europeans think it's Donald Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney and Condoleezza Rice. I'm not kidding. Chris Patten, the European Union's foreign policy czar, told The Guardian that the Bush axis-of-evil idea was dangerously "absolutist and simplistic," not "thought through" and "unhelpful," and that the Europeans needed to stop Washington before it went into "unilateralist overdrive."
FEATURES
February 20, 1991
Carol Brody opened Craft Concepts 12 years ago at the Green Spring Station, along with co-owner Carole Halverstadt. Brody, a former potter and jeweler, started small and gradually grew to selling an array of handcrafted jewelry and wearable crafts. Many of the things in her store are done by artists who will be showing at the American Craft Council Show at the Convention Center and Festival Hall this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.How would you describe your taste in clothing?I like comfortable, unstructured clothing with classic lines that hides my flaws and helps my assets.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2003
NEAR THE IRAQ-KUWAIT BORDER - Sheik Wallay Rakan draws no lines in time, no measurements in months or days. His life moves in seasons. The signposts that mark his road are the births of his children, the loss of his camels, the death of his eldest son. So he can't tell the exact year when the black days began. But when he had to sell his last, favorite camel, Aliyan, he knew he was losing his grip on survival. He sits cross-legged, his back ramrod straight, under the roof of chaotically stitched sacks that line his low, black-wool Bedouin tent.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2003
WADI RUM, Jordan - Using pickup trucks and camels, the Bedouins of Jordan's legendary desert police patrol a vast sea of pink sand and mountains in one of the most remote precincts on Earth. With the officers' red-and-white-checked head scarves flying in the wind, the blue trucks speed past the towering stone pinnacles that T.E. Lawrence - Lawrence of Arabia - dubbed the Seven Pillars of Wisdom. The vehicles fishtail in the deep sand as mountains rise up on both sides of the valley like enormous teeth from the desert floor.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2002
JERUSALEM - Security talks were delayed again yesterday amid Palestinian outrage over an Israeli army shelling the night before that killed four Palestinians as they rested near a fig tree in the Gaza Strip. The Israeli-Palestinian talks - stalled this week after renewed violence - were to cover the next phase of a trial plan in which Israeli troops pull out of cities they captured during the past two months. In return, Palestinian security forces are supposed to prevent the areas from being used as bases for attacks on Israeli civilians or soldiers.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
A Memorable Place Lessons in life from a desert nomad By Elizabeth Atalay SPECIAL TO THE SUN Life lessons can come from the most surprising people and places. I learned this with my mother, who was perched atop a camel like the Queen of Sheba. She bobbed and wobbled with each of the camels' lurching steps, letting out squeals of delight and fear as we progressed deeper into the Negev desert in Israel. Our camel-trek leader, a local Bedouin named Razi, told me that my mother reminded him of his own mother.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 17, 2002
LONDON - Reading Europe's press, it is really reassuring to see how warmly Europeans have embraced President Bush's formulation that an "axis of evil" threatens world peace. There's only one small problem. Mr. Bush thinks the axis of evil is Iran, Iraq and North Korea, and the Europeans think it's Donald Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney and Condoleezza Rice. I'm not kidding. Chris Patten, the European Union's foreign policy czar, told The Guardian that the Bush axis-of-evil idea was dangerously "absolutist and simplistic," not "thought through" and "unhelpful," and that the Europeans needed to stop Washington before it went into "unilateralist overdrive."
TRAVEL
By Story and photos by Lester A. Picker and Story and photos by Lester A. Picker,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2001
The ringing in my ears has finally stopped. Only now, for the first time since I arrived here 36 hours ago, can I hear the true sound of the great Sahara desert: silence. Utter, absolute, total quiet. In the desolate landscape of Egypt's Eastern Desert, part of the vast Sahara that stretches across much of northern Africa, there are no tree leaves to rustle in the wind. Most of the time there is no wind at all. Trees, like the acacia, are few and laced with thorns and rigid, needle-like leaves.
FEATURES
By James Warren and James Warren,Chicago Tribune | July 30, 1995
In "The Bridges of Madison County," fictional photographer Robert Kincaid calls National Geographic about a photo he's pitching for a magazine calendar."
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 1, 1993
Paris. -- Iraqis of an age to remember the 1920s will have memories to attach to the attack made last weekend by U.S. missiles on the headquarters of Iraq's principal intelligence service.From 1920 to 1932 Iraq was a League of Nations mandate under British administration, which for practical purposes meant that it was a latter-day colony of strategic interest to the British Empire, at the time obsessed with control of the land route to India. Control of Iraq involved pacification of the Bedouin tribal nomads of the Iraqi desert, who regarded government as distant and arbitrary and were often at war with one another as well as with the government in Baghdad.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2001
BECKY DANIEL stopped to say hello to a little boy after a recent Sunday service at Crofton's Prince of Peace Presbyterian Church. She asked the boy how he had liked his Sunday school program that morning, expecting a "fine" or "good" in response. But the boy fairly exploded with enthusiasm as he described learning about how God transforms things, as in the biblical story of Paul on the road to Damascus. The boy is enjoying a new approach to Sunday school, called the Workshop Rotation Model, which Prince of Peace has been employing during the past year under the leadership of Dana Marzolf, director of Christian education.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 1997
LAQIYA, Israel -- In the not-so-distant past of her ancient nomadic tribe, Amal El-Sana would have lived in a tent in the desert, and her role in life would have been fixed by restrictions as old as time.Lately, her Bedouin people have been gathered into modern villages. The tent has been replaced by cinder block. The camel has been replaced by the pickup truck. Children are going to school.But even so, Amal El-Sana is far ahead of most of her people.The petite, articulate 24-year-old has broken nearly every female stereotype of the Bedouin.
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