Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBedingfield
IN THE NEWS

Bedingfield

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
Jason Masters of Hammond and Andrea Bedingfield of Glenelg recorded individual triumphs in the MPSSAA District 5 golf tournament yesterday at Bear Creek Golf Club in Westminster. Masters shot a 5-over-par 76 and Bedingfield an 86.With 13 Class 3A-4A teams, the district, made up of teams from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, and Howard counties, was able to qualify three teams for the state tournament, Oct. 20-21, at the University of Maryland GC in College Park.Severna Park won the team title (four lowest scores)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | June 12, 2008
With the release of her second U.S. album, Pocketful of Sunshine, Natasha Bedingfield is once again at the top of the charts. The album went all the way to the No. 3 spot on the Billboard 200 chart, and both "Love Like This" (featuring R&B star Sean Kingston) and "Pocketful of Sunshine" have charted in the Top 15 on the Billboard Hot 100. Bedingfield brings her bubbly sounds and cheery voice to Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, Baltimore, on Tuesday. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ramsheadlive.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
Jason Masters of Hammond and Andrea Bedingfield of Glenelg recorded individual triumphs in the MPSSAA District 5 golf tournament yesterday at Bear Creek Golf Club in Westminster. Masters shot a 5-over-par 76 and Bedingfield an 86.With 13 Class 3A-4A teams, the district, made up of teams from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, and Howard counties, was able to qualify three teams -- Severna Park, Arundel and Annapolis -- for the state tournament, Oct. 20-21, at the University of Maryland GC in College Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004
Mr. & Mrs. William Waring, of Severna Park, MD, Mr. & Mrs. William King, of Chantilly, VA, and Mr. & Mrs. David Boucher, of Olney, MD are delighted to announce the marriage of Christopher Boucher and Michelle Waring on May 1, 2004. The marriage took place in a beautiful outdoor setting at the Elkridge Furnace Inn in Elkridge, MD. A champagne toast was held in the garden immediately after the ceremony followed by a reception in the Inn and a formal sit down dinner in the beautifully decorated outdoor pavilion.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
Jason Masters of Hammond and Andrea Bedingfield of Glenelg recorded individual triumphs and Severna Park won the team title in the MPSSAA District 5 golf tournament yesterday at Bear Creek Golf Club in Westminster. Masters shot a 5-over-par 76 and Bedingfield an 86.With 13 Class 3A-4A teams, the district, made up of teams from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, and Howard counties, was able to qualify three teams for the state tournament, Oct. 20-21, at the University of Maryland GC in College Park.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
WE'RE HARDLY out of the car in a blighted block of southern Baltimore when faces appear at windows and doorways. Three strangers, one scribbling notes, heading for a back alley - something's up. The truth is stranger than the neighbors might believe. Marion Bedingfield, a city forester and big-tree guru of Baltimore, has brought us here to appreciate the full and glorious potential of a weed. When you're responsible for about a half-million trees, it's hard to have one favorite, "but I can tell you we're all proud of this bad boy," Bedingfield says, pushing through junk and mattresses that clog the alleyway.
NEWS
By Jay Parsons and Jay Parsons,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2002
It wasn't so long ago that Baltimore tree service technician Marion J. Bedingfield planted dozens of shade-hungry crab apple and hawthorn trees on the median of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, as part of Mayor Martin O'Malley's zealous plan to green the city's gateways. Many of those trees withered within two years because of drought conditions prevalent throughout the region since 1999. So in May, Bedingfield returned to plant the more weather-sturdy sawtooth oak -- but in soil crusted with road debris and a watering area limited by asphalt curbs, many of the 100 oaks have browned and appear dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | September 28, 2003
The big old silver maple leaning like a tired Druid against Pastor John Highsmith's rowhouse came down with a whoosh, a sigh and a bang when Tropical Storm Isabel arrived at 5010 Cordelia Ave. in Pimlico. "I heard something say woo-oo-oo and then I heard a cracking," the pastor says. He and his wife, the Rev. Pearl Highsmith, both 71, were in a back room watching television about 10:50 that Thursday night. Their church is the Jesus Serves Church for All People at 3900 Maine Ave. Pastor Highsmith is well known for his fine baritone voice.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Al Capone's weeping cherry tree drapes a stunning canopy of pink in front of Union Memorial Hospital each spring, attracting arbor ardor from all who see it in bloom.Less celebrated, but no less spectacular, is a monument almost no one sees: a mammoth "Tree of Heaven" behind a derelict rowhouse in the 200 block of South Carey Street, one of those wild junk trees that sprout between cracks in concrete and push up through the floors of abandoned houses. It's a giant Ailanthus soaring nearly 60 feet on a trunk more than 15 feet around, according to its entry in the city's 1995 Notable Tree Commission registry.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
They sprout from storm sewers, sidewalk cracks and through the floors of vacant homes. Sometimes they even take root in rain gutters and on windowsills, nimble as cat burglars. Drive the Jones Falls Expressway, and you'll see them rising in mini-jungles beside the light-rail tracks, waving in the whoosh of traffic like palms in an island breeze. Although a poet once wrote that only God can make a tree, with the species ailanthus altissima - the ironically named Tree of Heaven - it often seems that only God can kill a tree, so hardy and prolific are its numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | September 28, 2003
The big old silver maple leaning like a tired Druid against Pastor John Highsmith's rowhouse came down with a whoosh, a sigh and a bang when Tropical Storm Isabel arrived at 5010 Cordelia Ave. in Pimlico. "I heard something say woo-oo-oo and then I heard a cracking," the pastor says. He and his wife, the Rev. Pearl Highsmith, both 71, were in a back room watching television about 10:50 that Thursday night. Their church is the Jesus Serves Church for All People at 3900 Maine Ave. Pastor Highsmith is well known for his fine baritone voice.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
If you're worried whether that tree near your house will survive Hurricane Isabel, you're not alone. But if you haven't done anything about it yet, it's probably too late. As the hurricane approaches the East Coast, tree surgeons are being deluged with calls from homeowners anxious to have threatening trees and limbs removed. At Timberline Tree Service in Fulton, Ron Rogers has stopped giving estimates to new customers because both of his three-member crews are busy from dawn to dusk.
NEWS
By Jay Parsons and Jay Parsons,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2002
It wasn't so long ago that Baltimore tree service technician Marion J. Bedingfield planted dozens of shade-hungry crab apple and hawthorn trees on the median of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, as part of Mayor Martin O'Malley's zealous plan to green the city's gateways. Many of those trees withered within two years because of drought conditions prevalent throughout the region since 1999. So in May, Bedingfield returned to plant the more weather-sturdy sawtooth oak -- but in soil crusted with road debris and a watering area limited by asphalt curbs, many of the 100 oaks have browned and appear dead.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
They sprout from storm sewers, sidewalk cracks and through the floors of vacant homes. Sometimes they even take root in rain gutters and on windowsills, nimble as cat burglars. Drive the Jones Falls Expressway, and you'll see them rising in mini-jungles beside the light-rail tracks, waving in the whoosh of traffic like palms in an island breeze. Although a poet once wrote that only God can make a tree, with the species ailanthus altissima - the ironically named Tree of Heaven - it often seems that only God can kill a tree, so hardy and prolific are its numbers.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2000
Louis C. Thuman, who rose from the Baltimore sandlots to the Washington Senators only to have his pitching career cut short by a German bullet, died of pneumonia Dec. 19 at Dulaney-Towson Health Care Center. He was 84. The lanky Baltimore native and Polytechnic Institute graduate was playing for the Apaches, a local amateur ballclub, when major-league scouts discovered him pitching at Bugle Field on Erdman Avenue. After a brief stint in the minor leagues, Mr. Thuman was promoted to the majors for the 1939 season, debuting as a pitcher for the Senators at age 22. Like many young pitchers, Mr. Thuman needed some breaking in: In his first two seasons, he pitched in only five games, giving up 15 hits and nine walks in nine innings, while registering one strikeout.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
WE'RE HARDLY out of the car in a blighted block of southern Baltimore when faces appear at windows and doorways. Three strangers, one scribbling notes, heading for a back alley - something's up. The truth is stranger than the neighbors might believe. Marion Bedingfield, a city forester and big-tree guru of Baltimore, has brought us here to appreciate the full and glorious potential of a weed. When you're responsible for about a half-million trees, it's hard to have one favorite, "but I can tell you we're all proud of this bad boy," Bedingfield says, pushing through junk and mattresses that clog the alleyway.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
As day broke over Baltimore yesterday, city streets were wind-swept, dark and wet. From morning rush hour till well after lunch, people walked with heads down, sidestepping puddles. Women held tight to their skirts and umbrellas were raised against skies washed a chilly gray.This is what passes for the dog days of summer this summer.Tomatoes are more green than red, utility companies have yet to beg the public to conserve energy, and while temperatures have been pleasant compared to the typical August oven, it sure is weird.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
As day broke over Baltimore yesterday, city streets were wind-swept, dark and wet. From morning rush hour till well after lunch, people walked with heads down, sidestepping puddles. Women held tight to their skirts and umbrellas were raised against skies washed a chilly gray.This is what passes for the dog days of summer this summer.Tomatoes are more green than red, utility companies have yet to beg the public to conserve energy, and while temperatures have been pleasant compared to the typical August oven, it sure is weird.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Al Capone's weeping cherry tree drapes a stunning canopy of pink in front of Union Memorial Hospital each spring, attracting arbor ardor from all who see it in bloom.Less celebrated, but no less spectacular, is a monument almost no one sees: a mammoth "Tree of Heaven" behind a derelict rowhouse in the 200 block of South Carey Street, one of those wild junk trees that sprout between cracks in concrete and push up through the floors of abandoned houses. It's a giant Ailanthus soaring nearly 60 feet on a trunk more than 15 feet around, according to its entry in the city's 1995 Notable Tree Commission registry.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.