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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
A former Baltimore County police chemist, whose work is being questioned by a nationally renowned legal clinic, left the department four months after acknowledging she did not understand the science of her forensic tests and that her blood work in a death-penalty case was "worthless," court papers show. Some local defense attorneys and officials with the Innocence Project, the New York-based clinic, say that this 1987 testimony, during a pretrial hearing in Robert Bedford's murder case, raises more warning flags about Concepcion Bacasnot's forensic work, and about how the former chemist may have affected Baltimore County defendants throughout the 1980s.
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TRAVEL
By Anne Farrow and Anne Farrow,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2003
When you walk the cobbled streets of New Bedford, Mass., these days, you smell the sea and fresh paint. Once one of the richest cities in America, with hundreds of ships calling it their home port, this Massa-chusetts city was the nation's whaling capital and a great textile manufacturing center before falling on decades of hard times. But the city Herman Melville praised for its "patrician-like houses" and beautiful gardens is coming back, and this time history is setting the agenda. The revival is centered in, and radiates from, a 13-block neighborhood that was designated a national park in November 1996.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and By Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
I own a piece of Bedford Falls -- 320 Sycamore, to be precise. Here, George Bailey, his wife and four kids lived a wonderful life, although he didn't realize it until it nearly slipped through his grasp. Now, I must decide whether this purchase was a wise investment -- or a boondoggle prompted by my subconscious response to Sept. 11. Besides, the place needs work. The Bailey home and three other buildings synonymous with the 1946 classic film starring Jimmy Stewart are available from Walgreens, the nation's largest drugstore chain, as part of its first It's a Wonderful Life illuminated village series.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
As Baltimore brokerage houses go, the firm of Chapin, Davis is one that has stayed - thanks to the fact that it's staid. It remains firmly planted in the North Baltimore community where it was founded a half-century ago, refusing to relocate downtown to the financial district that is home to most of its better-known competitors. The area it's entrenched in is home to many a Baltimore notable, who believe in the old-school way of letting friends manage their money. Proof of its deep-rooted ties to Baltimore's patrician social circles can be seen in a plain, green hardbound volume tucked away in a backroom cabinet at the Chapin, Davis office.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2002
CREATING A HOLIDAY atmosphere not unlike the town in the movie It's a Wonderful Life, Hampstead officials will throw the switch Friday to illuminate the town park and welcome the season. The park in front of the former Hampstead Elementary School has been transformed into a garden of lighted and moving figures, and the town Christmas tree has been placed on Main Street. At 7 p.m. Friday, the flashing lights and screaming sirens of the firetruck from Hampstead Volunteer Fire Department will signal the arrival of Mayor Christopher M. Nevin and Santa Claus, as they are driven down Main Street from the fire station to the park.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 2002
ATLANTA - The outspoken Rev. Arthur Allen Jr. was noncommittal last week after a jury convicted him and four followers of cruelty to children for whippings at his church. Asked whether he would follow a judge's order to stop advising parents to whip disobedient children, Allen said, "I'm going to follow the Ten Commandments," and would say no more. The 70-year-old House of Prayer pastor - who has often quoted the Bible to justify the whippings - faced the possibility of up to 20 years in prison.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 20, 2002
BEDFORD, Va. - For years, you could count on seeing Richard B. Burrow - looking "very executive" in his crisp business suit, as the local residents liked to say - lunching at the Snack Shop and regaling townspeople with talk of the cubic yards of concrete or the weight of granite planned for the National D-Day Memorial here. As president of the memorial's foundation since 1996, Burrow seemed as fervent about having the monument built quickly as the World War II veterans who knew that many of their comrades wouldn't live to see it. When the memorial was dedicated June 6 last year - in a stirring ceremony that attracted President Bush and 24,000 spectators from all over the country - this small town in southwest Virginia beamed with pride over the sprawling $25 million monument on a scenic hilltop.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 15, 2002
It's bracing - especially now - to see a picture like Hart's War, which touches on the ethical quandaries underlying the waging of a just war. But it only touches on them. Hart's War tests how long a movie can leave viewers in limbo, and how many tricks it takes to pull them out of it. The picture fails on both counts, and ends on a jarring note of uplift. But it's absorbing and occasionally stirring right up to the final celebration of honor - as well as truth, justice and the American way. Set in a German POW camp during World War II, the ironically titled Hart's War is named for Lt. Thomas Hart (Colin Farrell)
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and By Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEDFORD, VA. - Danny Johnson stands in his apple orchard overlooking the mountain ridges of this small southern Virginia town that have tempted and forsaken treasure hunters in search of secret pots of gold for more than a century. He shakes his head and laughs. He recalls one man who moved his neighbor's silo a few years ago to dig under it but ran out of money before he could put it back; the woman who was jailed for excavating parts of the town cemetery; and the two brothers who arrive on his doorstep each fall to dig more trenches between his apple trees.
TRAVEL
By Gary Gately and By Gary Gately,Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
Walter Howard never talked about what happened at Omaha Beach. For 57 years, the war raged inside his head. He could see the bodies on the beach, feel his heart pounding and his hands trembling, hear the hot metal hitting the water -- single shots from rifles, bursts from machine guns. Still, he never spoke of it to his wife, three sons or his fellow World War II veterans. Then a few months back, Howard came from his home in Canton, Ohio, to the new National D-Day Memorial in Bedford, Va., the tiny Blue Ridge Mountain town that lost much of a generation of its boys at Omaha Beach, Normandy.
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