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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- On a day when America was celebrating its 218th birthday, the nation's soccer team was trying to pull off one more miracle.Happy Birthday, America.Goodbye, World Cup '94.The Bebeto and Romario combination, one of the most lethal in soccer, teamed up for a goal as Brazil defeated the United States, 1-0, in the second round of World Cup competition yesterday.Bebeto scored in the 74th minute for Brazil, which will meet the Netherlands, a 2-0 winner over Ireland yesterday, in the quarterfinals Saturday in Dallas.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
FULLERTON, Calif. -- One day Romario is bolting to the sidelines, swinging his arms and rocking an imaginary baby. Another day he is pumping a clenched fist in the air, or hoisting up the No. 1 finger in front of the Brazilian crowds. Sometimes he moonwalks, and other times he struts.Romario acts like he owns the World Cup.Maybe because he does.Thus far, World Cup '94 has been Romario's Cup."Yes, I remember saying this would be Romario's Cup," said Romario, sounding a bit embarrassed about his prediction.
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SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
FULLERTON, Calif. -- One day Romario is bolting to the sidelines, swinging his arms and rocking an imaginary baby. Another day he is pumping a clenched fist in the air, or hoisting up the No. 1 finger in front of the Brazilian crowds. Sometimes he moonwalks, and other times he struts.Romario acts like he owns the World Cup.Maybe because he does.Thus far, World Cup '94 has been Romario's Cup."Yes, I remember saying this would be Romario's Cup," said Romario, sounding a bit embarrassed about his prediction.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The Brazilians feel right at home here. This is L.A. Hollywood cool. Beverly Hills hip. All the cool dudes have one name. Magic. Michael. Jack.And then there's Brazilian soccer cool. Samba. Steel drums. Chants. Flair. Creativity. And the one-namers. Romario, Bebeto and Cafu."Hey, this is great place, great location for our fans in this country to watch us play, and, of course, there is pressure, always pressure," Bebeto said. "When we win title, this is best place in U.S.A.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- The Brazilians feel right at home here. This is L.A. Hollywood cool. Beverly Hills hip. All the cool dudes have one name. Magic. Michael. Jack.And then there's Brazilian soccer cool. Samba. Steel drums. Chants. Flair. Creativity. And the one-namers. Romario, Bebeto and Cafu."Hey, this is great place, great location for our fans in this country to watch us play, and, of course, there is pressure, always pressure," Bebeto said. "When we win title, this is best place in U.S.A.
SPORTS
By John Powers and John Powers,Boston Globe | July 10, 1994
DALLAS -- It had been 20 years since they had played each other in the World Cup. They'll be talking about this one in Sao Paulo and Amsterdam and a hundred thousand soccer bars for another 50."I had help from above," Branco said yesterday afternoon after his free kick in the 81st minute pushed Brazil past the Netherlands, 3-2, at the Cotton Bowl and into a World Cup semifinal (against today's Romania-Sweden winner) for the first time since 1978.The real help the Brazilians had, charged the furious Dutch, was from a linesman who didn't see that Romario was offside when Bebeto put Brazil up 2-0 in the 62nd minute.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
TORRANCE, Calif. -- Maybe he should change his first name to "Other."That's how Italy's latest soccer star, Dino Baggio, 22, often has been described during World Cup '94. He's, oops, the "wrong one."The right one is teammate Roberto Baggio, the flamboyant forward with the undersized body, unmatched game-breaking ability and the most recognized ponytail in the sports world.Dino Baggio is a tall (6 feet 1) midfielder, has short-cropped hair and doesn't talk much. As recently as a month ago, fans said he did not deserve a spot on the national team.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- There were finally tears of joy, ones that are shared by an entire nation.Brazil ended its 24-year drought in the world's most prestigious sporting event with a 3-2 shootout win over Italy after 120 scoreless minutes in the World Cup championship yesterday before a crowd of 94,194 at the Rose Bowl.The win gave Brazil an unprecedented fourth World Cup title out of 15 tournaments, and may have silenced the Brazilian fans who have criticized coach Carlos Alberto Parreira for playing gritty defense instead of the traditional "samba" style of offensive soccer.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- It has been a great run. Large crowds. A few upsets. Some new stars arrived, some old ones faded. TV ratings were higher than expected, and so was the scoring. Millions of dollars were added to this nation's economy, and the U.S. national team may have had its own coming-out party.And now the climax.It's Brazil vs. Italy today at the Rose Bowl, with gorgeous &L mountainsserving as a backdrop to the international flavor of Europe mixing it up with South America.The world's biggest sporting event will feature some of the game's biggest names.
NEWS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- It was the World Cup '94 championship, American-style.The United States may not be on par with the rest of the world when it comes to soccer, but Americans sure can throw one grand farewell party.A crowd of 94,194 packed the Rose Bowl yesterday and watched Brazil defeat Italy in the first shootout to decide a World Cup title. After 120 minutes of scoreless soccer, Brazil made three penalty kicks to Italy's two."We had such confidence that the thought of losing the penalty shootout never crossed our mind," Brazil's Bebeto said.
SPORTS
By John Powers and John Powers,Boston Globe | July 10, 1994
DALLAS -- It had been 20 years since they had played each other in the World Cup. They'll be talking about this one in Sao Paulo and Amsterdam and a hundred thousand soccer bars for another 50."I had help from above," Branco said yesterday afternoon after his free kick in the 81st minute pushed Brazil past the Netherlands, 3-2, at the Cotton Bowl and into a World Cup semifinal (against today's Romania-Sweden winner) for the first time since 1978.The real help the Brazilians had, charged the furious Dutch, was from a linesman who didn't see that Romario was offside when Bebeto put Brazil up 2-0 in the 62nd minute.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- On a day when America was celebrating its 218th birthday, the nation's soccer team was trying to pull off one more miracle.Happy Birthday, America.Goodbye, World Cup '94.The Bebeto and Romario combination, one of the most lethal in soccer, teamed up for a goal as Brazil defeated the United States, 1-0, in the second round of World Cup competition yesterday.Bebeto scored in the 74th minute for Brazil, which will meet the Netherlands, a 2-0 winner over Ireland yesterday, in the quarterfinals Saturday in Dallas.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
PASADENA, Calif. -- Sometimes they are so creative, artistic and histrionic that their fierce competitiveness and relentless drive for greatness are forgotten.Brazil positioned itself to become the first team to win four World Cup titles by defeating Sweden, 1-0, last night in a semifinal game at the Rose Bowl.Brazil star forward Romario scored on a header inside the right post on a fluttering pass from defender Jorginho at the 80th minute.Brazil will play Italy, which along with Germany also has won three World Cup titles, Sunday afternoon here for the championship.
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