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chuck.gait@gmail.com | May 30, 2013
In a recent column, I wrote about a used musical instrument donation program that was sponsored by the Reservoir High School music department. Here's the rest of the story. The music directors at Reservoir started a chapter of the Tri-M Music Honor Society, which, according to the Tri-M website is "an international music honor society for middle/junior high and high school students that is designed to recognize students for their academic and musical achievements, reward them for their accomplishments and service activities, and to inspire other students to excel at music and leadership.
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NEWS
chuck.gait@gmail.com | May 30, 2013
In a recent column, I wrote about a used musical instrument donation program that was sponsored by the Reservoir High School music department. Here's the rest of the story. The music directors at Reservoir started a chapter of the Tri-M Music Honor Society, which, according to the Tri-M website is "an international music honor society for middle/junior high and high school students that is designed to recognize students for their academic and musical achievements, reward them for their accomplishments and service activities, and to inspire other students to excel at music and leadership.
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NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2003
For a few moments last week, Allison Stanley got an inkling of what it would be like to be a professional musician. The 15-year-old sophomore at Ellicott City's Homewood School played cello while accompanied by three members of the acclaimed Marian Anderson String Quartet. As she nervously played in front of her classmates, her rendition of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" accompanied by violins and viola filled the room with a beautiful, rich sound. The workshop held in the music room at Homewood, an alternative school, was part of an outreach program run by the Candlelight Concert Society - a nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion of music in Howard County.
NEWS
By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,sun reporter | January 6, 2008
On a given day, a classical guitar solo, a jazz band number or a piano sonata can be heard emanating from a former convent. Since 2001, the building at the John Carroll School has been used by the Maryland Conservatory of Music, a nonprofit organization that provides musical training in disciplines including chamber orchestra, musical theater, jazz band, choir, guitar ensemble and popular music. And in an effort to put a twist on the traditional perception of music instruction, the conservatory eschews the notion of a stuffy classroom with strict teachers insisting that every note is played to perfection, said Duke Thompson, the MCM's founder and director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 11, 1996
From the first, Jim Brickman knew his music was going to be a tough sell.It wasn't that what he played was dissonant or demanding; quite the contrary. As he makes plain on his current release, "By Heart," his songs are tuneful and direct, with all the melodic charm and rhythmic uplift expected of a pop hit.Trouble is, Brickman doesn't sing; he plays piano. Not jazz piano or new age piano, but pop piano. "I'm not as much of a pianist as I am a songwriter who uses the piano to express myself and my ideas," he explains, over the phone from a tour stop in Reno, Nev. "I think the approach that I'm taking is more of an emotional approach, and my interest is in connecting with people."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
WHATEVER ELSE it is, December is the month for music. Ponds, rivers and oceans of beautiful music. In the Baltimore area, music is flowing everywhere.On Page C14 is a chronological list of holiday concerts and other mostly classical music events through early January. Some events are free; some cost money. Many need reservations. Some reflect the religious themes of the season; others don't.A number require decision-making: eight concerts are listed at 3 and 3:30 p.m. Sunday. But the concerts are also spread out and varied enough to please anyone.
FEATURES
By Gordon C. Cyr and Gordon C. Cyr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 1996
The eminent composer Robert Hall Lewis died last Friday, just before his 70th birthday and barely a year into his retirement from Goucher College and the Peabody Institute.He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and his daughter, Renata. He is survived as well by his beautiful music: more than 70 orchestral works, including four symphonies and innumerable chamber works.Especially noteworthy among the latter are four string quartets, the last two of which are intense, highly concentrated examples of some of the best work in that medium done in our time.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 17, 2005
Musical theater results from a mysterious stage alchemy in which the finished product somehow is greater than the sum of its parts. You'll find more beautiful music in a symphony or your favorite band; a more engrossing story in a middling novel; and more elegant dancing in any ballet troupe. Somehow, it doesn't matter. We still flock in droves to musicals like Oklahoma! (currently at the Hippodrome Theatre for a two-week run) and pay dearly for the privilege. The secret appeal of musical theater may be its emotional transparency and immediacy - a quality that alternately entrances and embarrasses theatergoers, depending on their individual predilections.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Long before television, video games, Jell-O wrestling, speed dating, the Internet, paintball and the vile scourge of karaoke, there existed a form of entertainment so pure, simple and selfless that - like most pure, simple and selfless things - it didn't last long. People from different walks of life would gather at a common meeting place, break out their instruments and make music together - maybe not always beautiful music, but that wasn't the point. This pastime went by various names - jam, sing-along, hoedown, group sing - but none more silly than the one used by those who gathered, once upon a time, to play folk music: "Hootenanny," they called it. And, some still do. In the back room at Hogan's Alley - a South Baltimore tavern formerly called Cox's - they meet every other Sunday: Dave brings his mandolin, Chris his guitar.
NEWS
By Patrice Martin | December 17, 1991
Carlos Taylor was standing there encouraging violinist Michelle Hines, a student from the nearby School for The Arts. "Play. Let me hear it," he said.Nervously, she played -- beautifully.The sweet sound of the music went perfectly with the atmosphere; bright yellow-green decor, the natural smells of herbs and spices in the store, and the tasty aroma of food in the restaurant.Pauline Taylor and customers watched with warm smiles.What a way to be introduced to Live It, Not Diet, a health food store and restaurant owned by Carlos and Pauline Taylor.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2007
Hugh Grant, that prince of erotic dither, and Drew Barrymore, that queen of sweetly amorous emotion, generate a rare flirtatious zing in Music and Lyrics, an affable farce about a worn-out '80s singer-composer named Alex Fletcher (Grant) from a band called PoP! Barrymore plays Sophie Fisher, a former writing student who comes to his Upper West Side New York apartment to water his plants and ends up nurturing his creativity and finding her life's work as a lyricist. This movie doesn't pretend to be anything more than a cheerful night out, and on that count it scores: It will set a happy mood for couples and a lot of singles, too. PoP!
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 15, 2005
Funny, but they don't look maniacal. That's what they are, though, and proud of it. After 20 years of marriage and more than two decades as artistic collaborators, cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han have become classical music's power couple. Besides their onstage life - they kick off the classical portion of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center's fifth anniversary season tomorrow night - Finc- kel and Wu Han serve as artistic directors of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in New York and the much-admired Music@Menlo chamber music festival they founded in California's Silicon Valley.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Long before television, video games, Jell-O wrestling, speed dating, the Internet, paintball and the vile scourge of karaoke, there existed a form of entertainment so pure, simple and selfless that - like most pure, simple and selfless things - it didn't last long. People from different walks of life would gather at a common meeting place, break out their instruments and make music together - maybe not always beautiful music, but that wasn't the point. This pastime went by various names - jam, sing-along, hoedown, group sing - but none more silly than the one used by those who gathered, once upon a time, to play folk music: "Hootenanny," they called it. And, some still do. In the back room at Hogan's Alley - a South Baltimore tavern formerly called Cox's - they meet every other Sunday: Dave brings his mandolin, Chris his guitar.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 17, 2005
Musical theater results from a mysterious stage alchemy in which the finished product somehow is greater than the sum of its parts. You'll find more beautiful music in a symphony or your favorite band; a more engrossing story in a middling novel; and more elegant dancing in any ballet troupe. Somehow, it doesn't matter. We still flock in droves to musicals like Oklahoma! (currently at the Hippodrome Theatre for a two-week run) and pay dearly for the privilege. The secret appeal of musical theater may be its emotional transparency and immediacy - a quality that alternately entrances and embarrasses theatergoers, depending on their individual predilections.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 15, 2004
Whenever Mario Venzago conducts the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, you can count on having a good time. This weekend's visit is no exception. At a cursory glance, the program may seem unexceptional - two overtures by Rossini serving as bookends for Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto and Schubert's Symphony No. 8, known as the Unfinished. Look more closely, and you'll discover something re-christened Schubert's Finished Symphony, an intriguing, conjectural completion of the beloved work that came down to us with only a first and second movement.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2004
For two centuries of music history, eroica, the Italian word for "heroic," has been known exclusively as the nickname of Ludwig van Beethoven's heroically scaled Third Symphony. That has changed since 1986, when pianist Erika Nickrenz, violinist Adela Pena and cellist Sara Sant'Ambrogio came together to form the Eroica Trio. Now, 17 years later with five EMI recordings and several Grammy nominations in hand, these three virtuosos are bringing their artistry to some of the most distinguished concert venues in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson POP/ROCK Various Artists J.D. Considine | February 12, 1998
Ryuichi SakamotoDiscord (Sony Classical 60121)Who exactly is Ryuichi Sakamoto, anyway?That's not just a question for non-fans. Because after wading through the dense, orchestral textures of "Discord," even those familiar with Sakamoto's exquisitely chameleonic career may wonder what he's up to this time around.Granted, it has never been easy to draw a bead on the guy. New wave fans tend to think of him as a witty techno-rocker, thanks to Yellow Magic Orchestra, the pioneering synth-pop band he led in the early '80s.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1997
THEY CAME TOGETHER, just as they have for the past five years, to make beautiful music and to support a good cause.Ten area choirs took part in ESCAPE Inc.'s annual Ecumenical Sing Sunday evening at St. Stephen's Reformed Episcopal Church in Eldersburg.The choirs represented nine of the 17 churches in the South Carroll and a small group of churches in north Howard County that belong to the ministry. ESCAPE (Enabling Social and Church Advocacy for People Enrichment) provides money and other assistance for housing, food and utilities for the needy.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 19, 2003
Maybe there really isn't such a thing as a perfect performance, but I think I heard the closest thing to it when the Berlin Philharmonic paid a visit to the Kennedy Center Monday night. As a demonstration of collective virtuosity - the whole orchestra can turn on a pfennig - the concert would be hard to surpass. As a demonstration of intensely committed music-making, it will be hard to forget. There are good reasons why this Berlin band ranks in the highest echelon of the world's orchestral institutions, and it sure was fun being reminded of them: supple, finely honed string tone; brilliantly controlled brass and woodwinds; spectacular responsiveness to the tiniest of technical details.
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