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By GEOFFREY W. FIELDING | May 11, 1993
Now coming into full spring green leaf, just in time for the Preakness and other May activities, are some 100 Norway maples which have been planted in the center strip of Northern Parkway from North Charles Street to Liberty Road.This marks the end of the first phase of Beautiful Baltimore's tree-planting program. The next phase will be to plant similar traffic-hardy trees along the center strip of Northern Parkway from Bellona Avenue east to Walther Boulevard, just a couple of blocks west of Belair Road.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Tanika White and Abigail Tucker and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
Front foot at 3 o'clock, back foot at 12. Shoulders back, chest out, hips under. Smile! Fifty-one beauties struck the classic pageant pose when Miss USA 2005 aired live on NBC last night from the Hippodrome and Miss North Carolina USA, Chelsea Cooley, a 21-year-old from Charlotte, was crowned. And in the background, the city of Baltimore - and the state of Maryland - didn't look so bad either, particularly to tourism officials who estimated the 12 or so minutes of pre-filmed footage of the contestants traipsing about was worth about $4 million in national publicity.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
They are a small cadre of senior citizens now, pursuing the same simple mission they had when they planted their first flower bed at St. Paul and Centre streets a quarter century ago.The die-hard city gardeners named their group Beautiful Baltimore. They've been quietly living up to their name ever since, donating 100,000 flower bulbs and trees to a city that could never afford them.Last week, the gardening compatriots were at it again, donating 800 King Alfred daffodil bulbs to transform an unimpressive triangle of land in Seton Hill at Paca Street and Druid Hill Avenue into a showcase for next spring.
FEATURES
By Stacey Patton and Stacey Patton,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
It's just after dawn on a sticky-warm Baltimore Saturday, so for a few more moments, Druid Hill Park can continue its slumber. It's 78 degrees already, headed to 94, the weatherman says. The huge park is all but silent. No one splashes in the swimming pools; the jogging and bike paths are empty. Only the whisper of a breeze off the lake stirs the near-breathless air.Then, just like that, the stillness is gone. Car doors slam, and the chatter and laughter of five tall, robust black men begin echoing in the air. One man with light ash-brown hair hugs a leather basketball under his arm. It is just after dawn in Druid Hill Park, which means it's time to play ball.
NEWS
July 10, 1992
THOUGHT FOR today, from Jeremy Rifkin's recently published book "Beyond Beef:""Moving beyond the beef culture is a revolutionary act, a sign of our willingness to reconstitute ourselves, to make ourselves whole. . . . By doing battle with 'the world steer,' a new generation expresses its sensitivity to the biosphere and its regard for the plight of the poor. By eliminating beef from the human diet, our species takes a significant step toward a new species consciousness, reaching out in a spirit of shared partnership with the bovine.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
THERE is good and bad news for city gardeners.The bad news, as if it needed to be repeated, is the extremely dry weather much of the summer that is still taking its toll. The good news is that on account of that adversity, deadline for entries in Beautiful Baltimore Inc.'s annual garden contest has been postponed until Aug. 31.Over the years, hundreds of Baltimore gardens have been honored in this contest. Most winners have received a citation; a few particularly attractive entries a small plaque.
NEWS
April 24, 1992
This year's cool weather has produced a glorious spring. After years of premature blossoms, the Japanese cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake came out on time. Dogwoods and azaleas are now producing their colorful riot and a tulip watch is on for the peak of Sherwood Gardens.Spring is a grand season in Maryland. Much of its glory in Baltimore's public places is due to the efforts of countless volunteers. For decades, their fund-raising and labor of love have made Guilford's Sherwood Gardens what it is. (Come to think of it, even those cherry trees around Druid Hill Lake were donated by public-minded citizens.
NEWS
By Geoffrey W. Fielding | December 9, 1994
AFTER MORE THAN 20 years in which thousands of daffodil bulbs have been planted along key intersections throughout the city, Beautiful Baltimore, the group responsible for the plantings, has called it quits, at least for the 1994-95 season.The reason is a lack of cooperation on the city's part, the group's newsletter reports. The group wants the daffodils to die back naturally, giving them a chance to replenish and insure healthy blooms for years to come. But the group's wishes have been at cross-purposes with City Hall, which orders the foliage mowed upon complaints from residents.
NEWS
July 25, 1994
A WARM April and cool May produced glorious gardens in Baltimore this year. The hot summer may have faded some of that riot of colors, but many homeowners are working overtime to keep their gardens in shape.One way to recognize neighborhood green thumbs is to nominate them in the annual garden contest sponsored by Beautiful Baltimore Inc. The gardens must be in Baltimore city and visible from a public street. Send entries to 303 Oakdale Road, Baltimore 21210. Include the address and name of the owner or occupant.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | July 17, 1994
The chandelier of your dreams -- or the pedestal sink, shutters or gingerbread trim -- may be waiting for you if you're willing to drive a little way. Run by the nonprofit preservation group Historic York, Architectural Warehouse sells salvaged house parts and some consignment items.Sometimes whole houses are donated, sometimes Historic York's crew of volunteers goes out to reclaim building parts that might otherwise be lost to a bulldozer. You are the beneficiary because you don't have to buy a costly reproduction instead of the real thing at a good price.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
The beauty of ironThe balustrade in front of the Charles Village home looks more like sculpture than functional ironwork. The serpentine stems -- are they waterlilies or lotus plants? -- have been painted green and are so decorative you hardly notice how well they serve as security bars for the front window.The balustrade is the creation of local sculptor/upscale blacksmith Chris Gavin. A graduate of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, Gavin says his sculpture now takes a back seat to his more practical commissions, such as wrought-iron beds, gates and railings.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1996
They are a small cadre of senior citizens now, pursuing the same simple mission they had when they planted their first flower bed at St. Paul and Centre streets a quarter century ago.The die-hard city gardeners named their group Beautiful Baltimore. They've been quietly living up to their name ever since, donating 100,000 flower bulbs and trees to a city that could never afford them.Last week, the gardening compatriots were at it again, donating 800 King Alfred daffodil bulbs to transform an unimpressive triangle of land in Seton Hill at Paca Street and Druid Hill Avenue into a showcase for next spring.
NEWS
By Geoffrey W. Fielding | December 9, 1994
AFTER MORE THAN 20 years in which thousands of daffodil bulbs have been planted along key intersections throughout the city, Beautiful Baltimore, the group responsible for the plantings, has called it quits, at least for the 1994-95 season.The reason is a lack of cooperation on the city's part, the group's newsletter reports. The group wants the daffodils to die back naturally, giving them a chance to replenish and insure healthy blooms for years to come. But the group's wishes have been at cross-purposes with City Hall, which orders the foliage mowed upon complaints from residents.
NEWS
July 25, 1994
A WARM April and cool May produced glorious gardens in Baltimore this year. The hot summer may have faded some of that riot of colors, but many homeowners are working overtime to keep their gardens in shape.One way to recognize neighborhood green thumbs is to nominate them in the annual garden contest sponsored by Beautiful Baltimore Inc. The gardens must be in Baltimore city and visible from a public street. Send entries to 303 Oakdale Road, Baltimore 21210. Include the address and name of the owner or occupant.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | July 17, 1994
The chandelier of your dreams -- or the pedestal sink, shutters or gingerbread trim -- may be waiting for you if you're willing to drive a little way. Run by the nonprofit preservation group Historic York, Architectural Warehouse sells salvaged house parts and some consignment items.Sometimes whole houses are donated, sometimes Historic York's crew of volunteers goes out to reclaim building parts that might otherwise be lost to a bulldozer. You are the beneficiary because you don't have to buy a costly reproduction instead of the real thing at a good price.
NEWS
By GEOFFREY W. FIELDING | May 3, 1994
City Hall budget cuts may yet save Baltimore's magnificent spring display of daffodils -- a species in danger not from pests or poisons, but from politicians.Nothing brightens Baltimore more in springtime than the masses of daffodils which, over the years, have been planted in public places by Beautiful Baltimore, Inc. As faithful as the swallows that return to Capistrano, the daffodils push up their golden heads to greet the spring -- and visitors to the city.Beautiful Baltimore, founded some 20 years ago by Francis Rackemann, one-time garden editor for The Evening Sun, initially planted thousands of daffodils along the highways leading into Baltimore.
NEWS
By GEOFFREY W. FIELDING | May 3, 1994
City Hall budget cuts may yet save Baltimore's magnificent spring display of daffodils -- a species in danger not from pests or poisons, but from politicians.Nothing brightens Baltimore more in springtime than the masses of daffodils which, over the years, have been planted in public places by Beautiful Baltimore, Inc. As faithful as the swallows that return to Capistrano, the daffodils push up their golden heads to greet the spring -- and visitors to the city.Beautiful Baltimore, founded some 20 years ago by Francis Rackemann, one-time garden editor for The Evening Sun, initially planted thousands of daffodils along the highways leading into Baltimore.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
The beauty of ironThe balustrade in front of the Charles Village home looks more like sculpture than functional ironwork. The serpentine stems -- are they waterlilies or lotus plants? -- have been painted green and are so decorative you hardly notice how well they serve as security bars for the front window.The balustrade is the creation of local sculptor/upscale blacksmith Chris Gavin. A graduate of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, Gavin says his sculpture now takes a back seat to his more practical commissions, such as wrought-iron beds, gates and railings.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Goucher's fall courses offer a bit of everythingThis fall you can learn to design a room, bid at an auction, plan a spring garden or landscape your yard. The noncredit courses are offered by Goucher College's Center for Continuing Education.In "Elements of Interior Design," interior designer Diane Micelo will teach practical methods used by professional designers. The four sessions will include basic floor plans; use of color; floors, walls and windows; and basic furniture placement (Oct.
NEWS
August 17, 1993
THERE is good and bad news for city gardeners.The bad news, as if it needed to be repeated, is the extremely dry weather much of the summer that is still taking its toll. The good news is that on account of that adversity, deadline for entries in Beautiful Baltimore Inc.'s annual garden contest has been postponed until Aug. 31.Over the years, hundreds of Baltimore gardens have been honored in this contest. Most winners have received a citation; a few particularly attractive entries a small plaque.
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