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By Lisa Airey, thewinekey@aol.com | September 1, 2011
Beaujolais? Wow! There's no denying that Beaujolais Nouveau has become a commodity. It is bought and sold as a liquid cash crop. And that is exactly what it is. It is new wine, freshly vinified and rushed to market for a fast return on the growing season. Unfortunately, a good deal of it is not the happy wine it was cut out to be. The nouveau phenomenon took off in the 1950s and rocked the wine world until the year 2000. Even today, a third of Beaujolais' entire production is nouveau.
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June 26, 2013
From: Brouilly, Beaujolais, France Price: $19 Serve with: Roast poultry, grilled tuna, sausage Who would have thought brats and Beaujolais would go so well together? But this elegant wine from Brouilly, one of the more exalted sub-regions within the Beaujolais district, brought a refreshing acidity to contrast with the fattiness of the sausage. This medium-weight, vibrant red wine offers penetrating raspberry flavor. Minus the sweetness, it evokes memories of Chambord liqueur, with dollops of earth and game flavors.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Before there was Harry Potter midnight release parties, there was Georges Duboeuf, the mastermind behind the annual "third-Thursday-in-November" release of Beaujolais Nouveau. This year's release is accompanied by an energetic and fresh national campaign called Nouveau Expression -- the 2011 graffiti label is the work of the Brooklyn-based artist known as Mr. Kaves. Metropolitan will host its fifth annual "From the Barrel" Beaujolais Nouveau release party on Thursday at 7:00 p.m. The Federal Hill cafe and wine bar has again arranged to procure five small barrels of 2011 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Thursday is release day for 2012 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the big release, always scheduled for the third Thursday of November. Metropolitan Coffeehouse and Wine Bar in Federal Hill is having its 6th annual "From the Barrel" Beaujolais Nouveau release party on Thursday, featuring all-you-can-drink Beaujolais Nouveau and "tons of classic French cuisine," including boeuf Bourguignon, coq au vin, duck confit casserole, ratatouille and "killer French cheeses.
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By MICHAEL DRESSER | August 2, 1992
Bigger is not always better for Beaujolais.When the gamay grapes in the best vineyards of this splendid region become too ripe, the resulting wines can become dead ringers for concentrated red Burgundy of northern Rhones.That's what happened in 1989, and it might seem to be a great thing. You pick up a $10 bottle of Beaujolais from one of the top villages, and you could swear you're drinking a $20 wine from Savigny-Les-Beaune. What a bargain!But is it really? What was so disturbing about the vintage was that many of the wines had lost their connection with Beaujolais.
TRAVEL
By Doyle McManus and Doyle McManus,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
The winemakers of Beaujolais are not happy this year. That seems odd, considering they live in some of France's most beautiful villages, where old stone houses are decked with flowers amid hillside vineyards heavy with grapes, a half-day's drive south of Paris. But to hear the growers tell it, the world is in a perilous state. New wines from Australia are flooding the market, even in France. The cost of labor -- each grower hires students, retirees and migrant workers to pick the grapes -- keeps going up every fall.
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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
Georges Duboeuf is to Beaujolais as . . .a.) Morton is to salt.b.) Cal Ripken Jr. is to endurance.c.) Elvis is to sightings.d.) All of the above.If you guessed d.), you are correct. The estimable Monsieur Duboeuf dominates his region more thoroughly than any other important figure in the world of wine.Go into just about any serious wine shop in the United States and ask for Beaujolais. Most likely the sales person will lead you to a display of Duboeuf wines. There might be a few scattered offerings from other producers, but there will be no doubt who holds the title of "King of Beaujolais."
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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | September 15, 1996
In a world of ponderous complexity, the wines of Beaujolais are refreshingly simple and simply refreshing.There is no rating system to remember, and you needn't concern yourself with questions about whether the latest vintage is ready to drink. It always is.The wines are as easy to drink as they are to understand. They can be served with many foods, from fish to chicken to beef.Many fine producers export Beaujolais to the United States, but there's only one you really have to know about -- Georges Duboeuf.
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By Lisa Airey | September 22, 2011
September meals still hold summer's warmth. Lighter dishes in the form of fish and shellfish continue to find their way onto the table, yet nights are cool and beg for red wine.  Red wine with fish? It can be done, and successfully too. It just takes knowing your elements and how to combine them, alchemy fashion. Tannins in red wine often react with fish oil to produce a bitter, metallic, copper penny taste on the palate. The fish ends up tasting quite fishy and the wine turns into liquid aluminum foil.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | November 9, 1994
This top Beaujolais estate is loaded with raspberry fruit. It's racy and lively, but with a tannic edge found in few Beaujolais wines. It's good now but could improve over the next two or three years or more. Dropping prices have made the top Beaujolais cru wines bargains again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Before there was Harry Potter midnight release parties, there was Georges Duboeuf, the mastermind behind the annual "third-Thursday-in-November" release of Beaujolais Nouveau. This year's release is accompanied by an energetic and fresh national campaign called Nouveau Expression -- the 2011 graffiti label is the work of the Brooklyn-based artist known as Mr. Kaves. Metropolitan will host its fifth annual "From the Barrel" Beaujolais Nouveau release party on Thursday at 7:00 p.m. The Federal Hill cafe and wine bar has again arranged to procure five small barrels of 2011 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau.
EXPLORE
September 22, 2011
September meals still hold summer's warmth. Lighter dishes in the form of fish and shellfish continue to find their way onto the table, yet nights are cool and beg for red wine.  Red wine with fish? It can be done, and successfully too. It just takes knowing your elements and how to combine them, alchemy fashion. Tannins in red wine often react with fish oil to produce a bitter, metallic, copper penny taste on the palate. The fish ends up tasting quite fishy and the wine turns into liquid aluminum foil.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Aireythewinekey@aol.com | September 15, 2011
Everyone has a few favorite food items that galvanize them when they peruse a menu. Citrus, mushrooms, spice, chocolate, tomato …whatever it is, it tantalizes the emotions and helps in the decision-making. Those personal food preferences also reveal a lot about personal wine preferences. Your breakfast beverage of choice is very telling. As a general rule, those who drink orange juice by preference love the fruit-forward character of New World wines. Those who prefer the high acidity of pink grapefruit juice revel in the structure and complexity of Old World wines.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Airey, thewinekey@aol.com | September 1, 2011
Beaujolais? Wow! There's no denying that Beaujolais Nouveau has become a commodity. It is bought and sold as a liquid cash crop. And that is exactly what it is. It is new wine, freshly vinified and rushed to market for a fast return on the growing season. Unfortunately, a good deal of it is not the happy wine it was cut out to be. The nouveau phenomenon took off in the 1950s and rocked the wine world until the year 2000. Even today, a third of Beaujolais' entire production is nouveau.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
This fresh, in-your-face red wine is all about up-front, dynamic fruit. There's nothing laid-back or subtle in this blend of Rhone Valley grapes plus Carignan and Tempranillo — just a ton of raspberry, blackberry and herb flavors cascading over the palate in a glorious rush. It's not a light wine like a Beaujolais, but it has a similar fruity, nontannic appeal. Why wait years to twist off the screw cap when it's so enjoyable right now? (It's only 17 percent of the blend, but this wine screams grenache.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | February 11, 2009
Oysters make you amorous, or so the story goes. So as Valentine's Day approached, I went on the prowl for wines that embrace the bivalve. Like the lovelorn, I sought advice from those who had played this mating game. Executive chef Benjamin Erjavec reported that when some 200 diners paired oysters with wines at a recent mating event held at Oceanaire restaurant on Aliceanna Street, the crowd favorite was a French sauvignon blanc, Lalande. Meanwhile, a Baltimore wine merchant suggested the classic match of Muscadet and oysters.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | October 25, 1995
Consistently one of the best wines from Beaujolais, the Jean Descombes Morgon is a great success in the fine 1994 vintage. The concentrated raspberry and black cherry flavors are a sensual delight, punctuated by a racy acidity that keeps matters from becoming too ponderous. There's a wonderful purity and focus here. The Chateau Haut-Brion of Beaujolais?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 26, 2008
This medium-bodied, nonvintage red wine is a multistate blend of syrah, pinot noir and zinfandel from the well-respected Sokol Blosser winery in Oregon. It provides a rush of intense fruit flavor, with hints of black cherry and herbs, and a great deal of charm. It finishes with a refreshing acidity, giving it more kinship to a top-notch Beaujolais than to heavier reds. This is a wine to enjoy now, not to stick in the cellar. Meditrina Red Table Wine From : United States Price: $19 Serve with: Roast poultry, pasta
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