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By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | April 23, 2013
The folks at "House of Cards" sure love the Baltimore area. Not only is the majority of the political thriller filmed in and around the city (and, full disclosure, in The Baltimore Sun newsroom), now the show's head honcho, Beau Willimon, is slated to come to Towson University on Wednesday (April 24) to discuss how he developed the addictive series. According to a Towson University press release, Willimon will speak at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday in Van Bokkelen Hall, Room 204. The event is free and open to the public.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Netflix today released a stylish trailer for "House of Cards," the Baltimore-made political thriller starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright. The opening suggests that screenwriter Beau Willimon has successfully re-imagined the tricky form of address featured in the BBC original with the lead character talking directly to the audience at key moments. Spacey nails the technique and it seems perfectly apt for American politics in this trailer. Check it out. I love the answer given when one character asks what will happen if he doesn't play ball: "Then we'll cleave you from the herd and watch you die in the wilderness.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
After a politically stormy off-season, the return of "House of Cards" to Maryland becomes a reality with casting call notices like this one going out. Here's part of the notice SAG-AFTRA members in this region received. Note the role of NSA director; the NSA would be a nice storyline in Season 3, wouldn't it? There are also roles for two reporters -- ages 35 to 55. Is the mainstream media going to be back for more of a pounding by showrunner and former Howard Dean staffer Beau Willimon?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
In the Netflix miniseries "House of Cards," Kate Mara plays a young reporter deeply involved in the world of Washington politics. But the 30-year-old performer says she has no particular interest in journalism or political life. She's just acting the part under the tutelage of screenwriter Beau Willimon and director David Fincher. "I'm not interested in politics or being a part of them," she said in a teleconference this week. "I definitely do my homework and make sure I know what's going on and am responsible enough to be able vote for people I respect and that kind of thing...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday announced something that had been widely known in Baltimore at least for the last two weeks: That the Netflix series "House of Cards" was back in town to film its second season. The White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington Saturday night opened with a spoof featuring Kevin Spacey that was filmed on the "House of Cards" set. And crew members have been working for the last two weeks inside the Baltimore Sun building on Calvert Street rebuilding the "House of Cards" newsroom set. But principal photography on the the second season officially started today, according to the Maryland Film Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
After a politically stormy off-season, the return of "House of Cards" to Maryland becomes a reality with casting call notices like this one going out. Here's part of the notice SAG-AFTRA members in this region received. Note the role of NSA director; the NSA would be a nice storyline in Season 3, wouldn't it? There are also roles for two reporters -- ages 35 to 55. Is the mainstream media going to be back for more of a pounding by showrunner and former Howard Dean staffer Beau Willimon?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
There's a scene near the end of one of the first episodes of the new season of “House of Cards” that features Frank (Kevin Spacey) and Claire (Robin Wright) Underwood late at night sharing a smoke at an open window of their Washington townhouse. The setting has become a favorite site for writer and showrunner Beau Willimon to explore the particular brand of intimacy enjoyed by these two attractive and complex political predators trying to impose their will on Washington: he as a South Carolina congressman who has risen to majority whip, and she as the politically ambitious head of a nonprofit dealing with the environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Netflix and its Baltimore-based "House of Cards" made history Thursday as the Primetime Emmy Award nominations were announced in Los Angeles. It was the first time a series not presented on over-the-air broadcast or cable TV was nominated in the major categories. "House of Cards" offered a new business model for the TV industry when it debuted in February with a full season's worth of episodes streaming online. And while the money part of the model is still being debated, the artistic excellence of the series was affirmed with nominations in some of the biggest categories: best drama, Kevin Spacey for best dramatic actor and Robin Wright for best dramatic actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
NEW YORK - The green shoes. That's what caught my eye as I sat down across from Kevin Spacey at the Regency Hotel last week and took a mental snapshot of his outfit before asking the first question. Neat, gray pinstriped suit, with a charcoal shirt open at the collar - and green shoes. And you know what? He made it work. Spacey looked great. Unlike many film and TV stars, though, Spacey's appeal is far more than skin-deep. As much style as he has, the artistic and intellectual substance of Kevin Spacey is what impresses most.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
There's a scene near the end of one of the first episodes of the new season of “House of Cards” that features Frank (Kevin Spacey) and Claire (Robin Wright) Underwood late at night sharing a smoke at an open window of their Washington townhouse. The setting has become a favorite site for writer and showrunner Beau Willimon to explore the particular brand of intimacy enjoyed by these two attractive and complex political predators trying to impose their will on Washington: he as a South Carolina congressman who has risen to majority whip, and she as the politically ambitious head of a nonprofit dealing with the environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
There's bad journalism, and then, there is bad online, show-biz journalism, which is in a class by itself when it comes to laziness, lack of fact-checking and flatout hack-ocity (I know that's not a word, but it speaks to my anger at the moment). Huffington Post put a report up Thursday with the headline, "'House of Cards' Season 2 Likely to Be its Last, Producer Says. " That could be of some interest not only to fans of the Netflix series, but also folks in Baltimore where the series in filmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
When the Maryland workers building the sets for "House of Cards" started sawing and hammering the offices and homes of characters like Francis and Claire Underwood 20 months ago in Harford County, most of them were thinking only of earning a steady paycheck, not being part of TV history. After all, one of them said to me, how were people going to even see it if it wasn't going to be on TV? And if it was so good, she added, why wasn't it going to be AMC or HBO? Happily, the audience had no trouble finding "House of Cards" when it debuted a year later with 13 episodes online all at once Feb. 1 on Netflix.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Netflix and its Baltimore-based "House of Cards" made history Thursday as the Primetime Emmy Award nominations were announced in Los Angeles. It was the first time a series not presented on over-the-air broadcast or cable TV was nominated in the major categories. "House of Cards" offered a new business model for the TV industry when it debuted in February with a full season's worth of episodes streaming online. And while the money part of the model is still being debated, the artistic excellence of the series was affirmed with nominations in some of the biggest categories: best drama, Kevin Spacey for best dramatic actor and Robin Wright for best dramatic actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley Monday announced something that had been widely known in Baltimore at least for the last two weeks: That the Netflix series "House of Cards" was back in town to film its second season. The White House Correspondents Dinner in Washington Saturday night opened with a spoof featuring Kevin Spacey that was filmed on the "House of Cards" set. And crew members have been working for the last two weeks inside the Baltimore Sun building on Calvert Street rebuilding the "House of Cards" newsroom set. But principal photography on the the second season officially started today, according to the Maryland Film Office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
There's bad journalism, and then, there is bad online, show-biz journalism, which is in a class by itself when it comes to laziness, lack of fact-checking and flatout hack-ocity (I know that's not a word, but it speaks to my anger at the moment). Huffington Post put a report up Thursday with the headline, "'House of Cards' Season 2 Likely to Be its Last, Producer Says. " That could be of some interest not only to fans of the Netflix series, but also folks in Baltimore where the series in filmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
When the Maryland workers building the sets for "House of Cards" started sawing and hammering the offices and homes of characters like Francis and Claire Underwood 20 months ago in Harford County, most of them were thinking only of earning a steady paycheck, not being part of TV history. After all, one of them said to me, how were people going to even see it if it wasn't going to be on TV? And if it was so good, she added, why wasn't it going to be AMC or HBO? Happily, the audience had no trouble finding "House of Cards" when it debuted a year later with 13 episodes online all at once Feb. 1 on Netflix.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | April 23, 2013
The folks at "House of Cards" sure love the Baltimore area. Not only is the majority of the political thriller filmed in and around the city (and, full disclosure, in The Baltimore Sun newsroom), now the show's head honcho, Beau Willimon, is slated to come to Towson University on Wednesday (April 24) to discuss how he developed the addictive series. According to a Towson University press release, Willimon will speak at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday in Van Bokkelen Hall, Room 204. The event is free and open to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
In the Netflix miniseries "House of Cards," Kate Mara plays a young reporter deeply involved in the world of Washington politics. But the 30-year-old performer says she has no particular interest in journalism or political life. She's just acting the part under the tutelage of screenwriter Beau Willimon and director David Fincher. "I'm not interested in politics or being a part of them," she said in a teleconference this week. "I definitely do my homework and make sure I know what's going on and am responsible enough to be able vote for people I respect and that kind of thing...
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