Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBeatrix Potter
IN THE NEWS

Beatrix Potter

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2007
Even though it might not be a box-office hit in the United States, Renee Zellweger's recent film, Miss Potter, is giving the Lake District of England, the region where the majority of the movie about the children's book author Beatrix Potter was filmed, a much-needed boost in tourism. "The movie is helping our overseas visitors finally get over those horrible images of foot-and-mouth disease in the English countryside," said Andrew Poole, deputy manager of the World of Beatrix Potter, an attraction based in Bowness-on-Windermere, which centers on the author and illustrator's life and storybook characters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | March 23, 2008
Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature By Linda Lear Bethesda writer Linda Lear spent eight years researching this biography of the English author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny and Jemima Puddle-Duck. Poring over Potter's code-written diary and correspondences, she created a richly detailed story of a woman who was a passionate naturalist and astute businesswoman. Growing up in Victorian England, Potter enjoyed summer holidays in the English Lake District, where she began studying fungi.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 6, 1994
The story of Peter Rabbit is well-known to many, but the life of English author Beatrix Potter may not be as familiar a tale.Potter, who died in 1943 at age 77, was a naturalist, businesswoman, farmer and conservationist as well as the creator of beloved children's books.Her varied life is the subject of the exhibit "Through the Garden Gate: The World of Beatrix Potter," through May 15 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County."I think, in the back of her mind, children's stories were the last thing she wanted to be known for," says Laura Lee Martin, traveling exhibits coordinator with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, which organized the exhibit.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 9, 2007
Miss Potter puts into seductive, hand-crafted form the struggle of a woman to plot out her fate fourscore years before "Miss" became "Ms." It's a lovingly wrought biopic about Beatrix Potter (Renee Zellweger), the most successful children's author until J.K. Rowling cooked up a Potter named Harry. Director Chris Noonan (Babe) and writer Richard Maltby Jr. pick up her story at the turn of the 20th century, when she's in her 30s and about to sell The Tale of Peter Rabbit. From the start, you feel you're in for a treat.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
ONE OF THE great passages in children's literature occurs on the second page of a little book conceived in England a century ago and published privately in time to be given as a Christmas present in 1901:"`Now my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, `you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden. Your father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.'" Millions of readers know, of course, that Peter Rabbit, brother of the better-behaved Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-tail, ignored his mother's warning and came perilously close to meeting the same fate as his father.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
It's tempting to imagine Peter Rabbit peering out from beneath a hedge in Linda Lear's bewitching English-style garden. Lear recently published a biography of Beatrix Potter, the British author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddleduck and Squirrel Nutkin in her illustrated children's books. It's true that a river glimpsed from Lear's home in Bethesda is the Potomac, and not a tributary meandering through the Scottish border country, which provided inspiration for many of Potter's classic stories.
FEATURES
September 30, 1998
Are you a city mouse or a country mouse? Your children will like these stories, no matter where you live.For city dwellers:"Eloise," by Kay Thompson"Eleanor," by Barbara Cooney"Apt. 3," by Ezra Jack Keats"The Cricket in Times Square,"by George Seldon"The Little House," by Virginia Lee Burton"Taxi: A Book of City Words,"by Betsy MaestroFor country folks:"The Little House," by LauraIngalls Wilder"Time of Wonder," by RobertMcCloskey"The Tale of Peter Rabbit,"by Beatrix Potter"All the Places to Love,"by Patricia MacLachlan- Courtesy Barnes & Noble,Annapolis Harbour CenterPub Date: 9/30/98
NEWS
By Beverly K. Fine | April 9, 1993
WHAT literary character hops into the minds of children, as well as the young in heart, at Easter? Quick as a bunny, out pops the answer: Peter Rabbit!Therefore, on the centennial of the rambunctious rabbit's entrance into the world of children's literature, we present him with the Golden Carrot Award for best performance in an animal literary series.And to his creator, Beatrix Potter, we express gratitude for igniting the imagination of millions of readers.Born in London in 1866, Beatrix Potter summered with her family in the bucolic Scottish countryside.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | January 3, 1992
CHICAGO -- Here's a different kind of catalog, designed for all those ninos whose parents want them to have books and toys that will help them know about their heritage and language."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | March 23, 2008
Beatrix Potter: A Life in Nature By Linda Lear Bethesda writer Linda Lear spent eight years researching this biography of the English author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny and Jemima Puddle-Duck. Poring over Potter's code-written diary and correspondences, she created a richly detailed story of a woman who was a passionate naturalist and astute businesswoman. Growing up in Victorian England, Potter enjoyed summer holidays in the English Lake District, where she began studying fungi.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
It's tempting to imagine Peter Rabbit peering out from beneath a hedge in Linda Lear's bewitching English-style garden. Lear recently published a biography of Beatrix Potter, the British author who created such beloved characters as Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddleduck and Squirrel Nutkin in her illustrated children's books. It's true that a river glimpsed from Lear's home in Bethesda is the Potomac, and not a tributary meandering through the Scottish border country, which provided inspiration for many of Potter's classic stories.
TRAVEL
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2007
Even though it might not be a box-office hit in the United States, Renee Zellweger's recent film, Miss Potter, is giving the Lake District of England, the region where the majority of the movie about the children's book author Beatrix Potter was filmed, a much-needed boost in tourism. "The movie is helping our overseas visitors finally get over those horrible images of foot-and-mouth disease in the English countryside," said Andrew Poole, deputy manager of the World of Beatrix Potter, an attraction based in Bowness-on-Windermere, which centers on the author and illustrator's life and storybook characters.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
ONE OF THE great passages in children's literature occurs on the second page of a little book conceived in England a century ago and published privately in time to be given as a Christmas present in 1901:"`Now my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, `you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden. Your father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.'" Millions of readers know, of course, that Peter Rabbit, brother of the better-behaved Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-tail, ignored his mother's warning and came perilously close to meeting the same fate as his father.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
Furnishings take it easy on environment Free-lance designer Inna Alesina has created a lot of things in her career -- wristwatches, furniture, an infant drinking cup -- but when she designs for herself, everything is green. That's green as in environmentally friendly; Alesina uses recycled materials such as egg cartons, drinking straws and shredded paper to create household objects that are functional and mysteriously beautiful. Her Good Egg ottoman ($150) is made from egg crates stacked, shaped, and strapped together.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 23, 1999
Beatrix Potter introduced me to foxgloves. Until I saw them in her children's story "The Tale of Jemima Puddleduck," I hadn't known such marvels existed. They looked like purply-pink cathedral spires spangled with bells, a whole thicket of them surrounding the cottage of the "whiskered, bushy-tailed gentleman" of the story -- the fox who was after Jemima's eggs."They're an old garden plant and conjure up the old cottage-garden atmosphere," says Englishman John Elsley, horticulturist at Wayside Gardens in South Carolina.
FEATURES
September 30, 1998
Are you a city mouse or a country mouse? Your children will like these stories, no matter where you live.For city dwellers:"Eloise," by Kay Thompson"Eleanor," by Barbara Cooney"Apt. 3," by Ezra Jack Keats"The Cricket in Times Square,"by George Seldon"The Little House," by Virginia Lee Burton"Taxi: A Book of City Words,"by Betsy MaestroFor country folks:"The Little House," by LauraIngalls Wilder"Time of Wonder," by RobertMcCloskey"The Tale of Peter Rabbit,"by Beatrix Potter"All the Places to Love,"by Patricia MacLachlan- Courtesy Barnes & Noble,Annapolis Harbour CenterPub Date: 9/30/98
NEWS
March 25, 1993
PETER Rabbit is about to reach age 100, according to a sle of retail advertisements. The younger-reader long-ears they honor is the British one, created by (Helen) Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), not the American Peter who came along about 10 years later, forming in the mind of Thornton Waldo Burgess (1874-1965).What storyteller was the first anywhere to christen a rabbit Peter? All we know now is how various are the names to which a jolly rabbit gentleman responds, from Br'er to Uncle Wiggily to Bugs to Roger and beyond.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
Furnishings take it easy on environment Free-lance designer Inna Alesina has created a lot of things in her career -- wristwatches, furniture, an infant drinking cup -- but when she designs for herself, everything is green. That's green as in environmentally friendly; Alesina uses recycled materials such as egg cartons, drinking straws and shredded paper to create household objects that are functional and mysteriously beautiful. Her Good Egg ottoman ($150) is made from egg crates stacked, shaped, and strapped together.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 6, 1994
The story of Peter Rabbit is well-known to many, but the life of English author Beatrix Potter may not be as familiar a tale.Potter, who died in 1943 at age 77, was a naturalist, businesswoman, farmer and conservationist as well as the creator of beloved children's books.Her varied life is the subject of the exhibit "Through the Garden Gate: The World of Beatrix Potter," through May 15 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County."I think, in the back of her mind, children's stories were the last thing she wanted to be known for," says Laura Lee Martin, traveling exhibits coordinator with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, which organized the exhibit.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | June 8, 1993
LONDON -- Contrary to what the Chinese calendar might say, this is the year of the rabbit.At least it is in England, in about a score of other countries around the world and in the hearts of rabbit lovers everywhere.Rabbit lovers, that is, not in the culinary or gustatory sense. Rather in the literary, metaphorical, allegorical, historical, even hopeful sense.Peter Rabbit is a hundred years old this year. That's an ancient age for a rabbit, even for an imaginary one in a book. But Peter is a different breed of bunny entirely.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.