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By Linda L.S. Schulte | December 4, 1995
I WILL RESIST all temptation to say it seems like onlyYesterdaybut the truth is that 30 years ago, I had already tired of the Beatles. Yes, it's true.In My LifeI've met only two people who weren't wild about the mop-haired songsters of my baby-boomlet era. It was one of the few things my Dad and I agreed on outside of family values (that's when a family not only talked about them but enforced them too.)Yeah, yeah yeahBoth my Dad and I agreed that they were talented songwriters and performers, and that at least two of them could genuinely carry a tune.
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NEWS
By Al Cunniff | September 15, 2014
I was already a huge Beatles fan when the group performed at the Baltimore Civic Center on Sept. 13, 1964. So that's why my Catonsville friends were surprised to learn where I spent that evening: at home. Those same friends were again surprised about 10 years later when I told them how I had met Paul McCartney by accident (well, sort of). Let me connect the dots between those two stories. I became an instant fan of The Beatles after hearing their music on Baltimore WCAO-AM radio in late 1963.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 5, 2001
GEORGE HARRISON'S death last week from cancer had what one writer called a "cultural resonance." Not because he put his individual mark on the world, but because he was a Beatle. He and his three partners attained various levels of individual acclaim, but their import inheres in the Beatles phenomenon. Mr. Harrison had a wry and wise take on it: The Beatles were like a shirt or a costume he wore, a separate thing, in effect, something with a life of its own that endures. In death, his distinction comes from having been called "the quiet Beatle," the shy man immersed in Eastern religion.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
It was important to look your best. After all, The Beatles were in town. Today, it's hard to believe such things were important. But for four 15-year-old girls from Highlandtown, preparing to head into downtown Baltimore for a rock concert, such matters were vital. Who knew what could happen? "In my mind, I thought for sure that Paul's gonna love me, he's gonna see me - in my little-girl fantasies, he'll know that eventually he'll marry me," explains Judy Comotto, now 65 and recently retired from running the continuing education program at Roland Park Country School , then 15 and, as Judy Troch , a star-struck teen totally in love with The Beatles.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | February 1, 2011
Centuries collide at The Obladi hotel on Main Street, but instead of an explosion, a harmonic convergence was created by owners T. Garland and Zan Wilson.   What they made was a little piece of heaven. “We were going with the 1968 Beatles in India vibe,” says Wilson, pointing out the mural of henna-painted hands in the lobby and a sofa covered in wasabi-colored leather. Yes, their hotel is named after Beatles song “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” and, yes, the faces of George, John, Paul and Ringo grace the walls over fireplaces in each of the four guest rooms.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 16, 1995
Years of speculation over whether the three surviving Beatles would ever get together again to make music ended yesterday when Paul McCartney released a statement announcing that he has recorded several new songs with George Harrison and Ringo Starr.It has been no secret that the surviving Beatles have been at work for some time on a 10-hour TV documentary, called "The Beatles Anthology." News of the project first emerged last February, with reports following that the three were working with an unfinished John Lennon demo to create a Beatles recording (Lennon died in 1980)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
It was important to look your best. After all, The Beatles were in town. Today, it's hard to believe such things were important. But for four 15-year-old girls from Highlandtown, preparing to head into downtown Baltimore for a rock concert, such matters were vital. Who knew what could happen? "In my mind, I thought for sure that Paul's gonna love me, he's gonna see me - in my little-girl fantasies, he'll know that eventually he'll marry me," explains Judy Comotto, now 65 and recently retired from running the continuing education program at Roland Park Country School , then 15 and, as Judy Troch , a star-struck teen totally in love with The Beatles.
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Contributing Writer | January 6, 1994
On a spring weekend less than a decade ago, three bandmates and I piled into a van, rattled up the New Jersey Turnpike and depiled into the Meadowlands.We were there for the annual "Beatlefest," a combination coming-together and excuse for mega-merchandising. Our goal was to perform three Beatles tunes during the band contest.It could have been any other kind of popular culture festival, except that wide-eyed teens and young adults inside the convention hall sported mop tops and Beatles ties and ogled every Beatles T-shirt and tongue depressor.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine | April 2, 1995
"A Day In The Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles," by Mark Hertsgaard. Illustrated. 434 pages. New York: Delacorte Press. $23.95More than a few writers have suggested that history is bunk, but nowhere is that more the case than in rock history. Page through almost any rock and roll reference, and eventually you'll come across some form of falsehood in the text.Although the distortion can be deliberate, as in score-settling bios like Albert Goldman's "Elvis" or Stephen Davis' "Hammer of the Gods," most misinformation is more innocent in origin.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1995
The operator of a 900-number for fans to vote for a Beatles reunion says it's for real. Well, sort of. He won't get that specific."They're being evasive now, but when they hit, they're going to hit hard," he mysteriously says of his company's unnamed employers, the promoters of the possible reunion. The ad from J.P.G.R. Inc. -- a sly evocation of John, Paul, George and Ringo -- appears in the Feb. 9 issue of Rolling Stone under this header: "BEATLES TOUR IN 1995.""Would you like to see the Beatles Get Back together for a 1995 world tour?
NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
In early summer 1969, Judy Garland died, the Stonewall Riots marked the beginning of the modern gay rights movement and we were a month away from setting foot on the moon. And these were the tracks everyone was listening to, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "Spinning Wheel," Blood, Sweat & Tears Horns + painted ponies (and other psychedelic imagery) = classic 1969 Blood, Sweat & Tears. 9. "Good Morning Starshine," Oliver The debut of Broadway musical "Hair" is responsible for Oliver's biggest hit, as well as people trying to figure out just what "starshine" was. 8. "Grazing in the Grass," The Friends of Distinction Depending on who you ask, this one is either about having a fun time outdoors or having a fun time outdoors with, you know, help from drugs.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
Your article on the 50 t h anniversary of the Beatles' American debut was great ( "Still the sound of the future Feb. 7). I go to some lengths to expose my daughter, who is 14, to The Beatles. At some point (hopefully) young people begin to understand the difference between popularity and musical talent. Thanks. Sean G. Bray, Timonium - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 6, 2014
It's an odd thing. Sometimes, when I speak before high school or college students, someone in the audience, knowing I began my professional life as a pop music critic, will ask what I think of music today. I always demur that I don't listen to a lot of it, but that most of what I do hear kind of, well ... bores me. While there are exceptions -- i.e., Adele -- much of it feels corporate, cold, plastic, image-driven, less reflective of talent than tech, more programmed than played.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 21, 2013
News of the closing of Simon "Cy" Avara's hair-styling academy - a Baltimore institution - arrives just as we enter the 50th anniversary of the start of the British Invasion of rock music. I make the connection because the British Invasion was as much about hair as it was about music, and one of the most notable things about Avara's career was his ability to adjust from crew cuts to mop tops. Not every barber was so flexible. First things first, regarding the British Invasion: A lot of people mark the start in early February 1964, when 73 million Americans tuned in to "The Ed Sullivan Show" to see the Beatles' debut on national television.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 28, 2012
The Library of Congress is full of wonderful treasures, and today it released a new chestful: a collection of interviews on topics such as sex, drugs and rock and roll. Included is Paul McCartney relating how pot and other drugs boosted the Beatles' creativity: “Sgt. Pepper owes a lot to drugs, to pot. That was us getting into that. It was rather innocent compared to what you talk about these days. It was very innocent. It was never seriously heavy stuff. Things got heavy later with one or two of us. Then, it was quite mild.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The melody is instantly familiar but the other sounds are not - horns boldly announce their arrival, the patient tempo crawls along and the voice is more Maryland than Liverpool. When the plea to stay kicks in - "Believe me when I beg you, don't ever leave me alone," he sings - the song's identity becomes clear. It's "Oh! Darling," the Lennon/McCartney classic, but this bouncing version comes courtesy of Yellow Dubmarine, a Rockville eight-piece that plays reggae versions of Beatles songs.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 22, 1994
Can it be? Are the Beatles really getting back together again?It's understandable if some longtime fans are a little skeptical. After 24 years of speculation, gossip, prayers and pipe-dreams, the news that a Beatles reunion is in the works is bound to seem too good to be true.But true it seems to be. A story in the New Yorker reported this week that the three surviving Beatles -- Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr -- will enter the studio next month to record new material for release in 1995.
FEATURES
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 24, 2003
Flat-out denials from representatives for Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono and a Los Angeles recording studio have not persuaded the curator of an auction Web site that a tape box doesn't prove the Beatles held a secret reunion in 1976. "Anything other than denials from the Beatles camp would be shocking," says Gary Zimet of the Moments in Time site (www.momentsintime.com). The Ampex tape box with the titles of five songs, a date (11-2-76) and performers listed as John, Paul, George and Rich, remains on the site.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | February 1, 2011
Centuries collide at The Obladi hotel on Main Street, but instead of an explosion, a harmonic convergence was created by owners T. Garland and Zan Wilson.   What they made was a little piece of heaven. “We were going with the 1968 Beatles in India vibe,” says Wilson, pointing out the mural of henna-painted hands in the lobby and a sofa covered in wasabi-colored leather. Yes, their hotel is named after Beatles song “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da,” and, yes, the faces of George, John, Paul and Ringo grace the walls over fireplaces in each of the four guest rooms.
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