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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 12, 1998
LET'S TALK ABOUT how you can get rich investing in Beanie Babies.For the benefit of those of you who live in primitive rain forest tribes, I should explain that Beanie Babies are little beanbag critters with cute names such as (these are real names) Smoochy the Frog, Spunky the Cocker Spaniel, Claude the Crab, Weenie the Dachshund, Floppity the Bunny, Tank the Armadillo and Chops the Lamb. Beanie Babies are manufactured in China the Brutal Dictatorship for a U.S. company called Ty Inc., which is named after the owner, Ty the Extremely Rich Person.
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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | December 2, 2006
This holiday season, the buzzword for hot toys is technology - from video consoles to digitized games to computerized stuffed toys. They're items that prompted gadget buffs to form long lines outside stores well before Thanksgiving. For some shoppers, that meant scant supply of items on Black Friday made for a bleak Friday. Such is the age of computerized entertainment, which has been steadily affecting the toy industry since the late 1990s. "What technology has done is change our idea of what is a toy," said Chris Byrne, analyst and co-editor of Toy Wishes magazine.
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By NEWSDAY | October 4, 1998
Sure, the Dow Jones industrial average is falling. World markets are in turmoil. But for the savvy investor, there's still one safe haven: Beanie Babies. Right?Well, maybe not. Just listen to this prospectus for the future of the sought-after stuffed animals from Harry L. Rinker, author of the "Official Guide to Collectibles":"A general feeling has developed that prices have reached the ridiculous level. ... A few years from now, their only value will be the ability to look nostalgically back on the craze and think 'If only I had sold then.
BUSINESS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Thomas S. Mulligan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2004
It was just an online classified ad, under Collectibles for Sale, but it sounded like a cry from the heart: "I'm tired of these things now. Please save me from them." Kelly Cabral of Tracy, Calif., placed the ad recently after coming across a box in her garage crammed with dozens and dozens of Beanie Babies, the floppy little stuffed animals that sparked an international trading frenzy in the late 1990s. Years earlier, there were days when Kelly and her husband, Dan, would join the early-morning crowds laying siege to gift shops that were expecting shipments of Beanies.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Carroll County nonprofits in need of money may be able to tap into the latest collector's craze to net big bucks. A group of local entrepreneurs is offering to help agencies raise money by holding Beanie Baby bingos.In recent months, the events have attracted hundreds of people and raised $1,500 for charity. The bingos are held at the Longwell Armory at 11 Longwell Ave."It's amazing how popular these bingos are," said Ronald J. Schroers, organizer of the bingos and city supervisor of Recreation and Activities for Westminster.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
A Sykesville man who failed to appear for trial in Carroll County on theft charges for allegedly bilking Beanie Baby customers on the Internet missed another court date yesterday because he has since been jailed in Baltimore County.Glen H. Brown, 27, of the 5900 block of Dale Court, did not appear yesterday because he wasn't brought from the Baltimore County Detention Center, said Assistant State's Attorney Clarence W. Beall III.The prosecutor asked Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. to rule that Brown had given up his right to a speedy trial by failing to appear in court March 15. Beall said any delay in the 180-day time limit for trial -- the so-called Hicks rule -- "has been caused by the defendant."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
A 28-year-old Sykesville man pleaded guilty Friday in Carroll County Circuit Court in a scheme to steal about $2,600 from people who ordered Beanie Babies from him on the Internet last year -- keeping their money without supplying the popular stuffed toys.Glen Howard Brown of the 5900 block of Dale Court acknowledged stealing amounts ranging from $125 to $400 from 13 families between Feb. 2 and May 1 by posting an advertisement with his computer. Fourteen charges were dropped in return for his guilty plea.
NEWS
September 24, 1998
NEVER underestimate the power of a Beanie Baby. Used to draw huge crowds to ball games and malls, the stuffed toys are something people, not just kids, can't seem to get enough of.In Westminster last weekend,the offer of a Beanie Baby in trade for any gun turned over to police resulted in 57 firearms surrendered at the Route 140 Village Shopping Center. That's a lot of firepower, even considering the soaring value of these dolls collectibles.Two merchants who organized the exchange called it a huge success.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 1999
EAST MIDDLE School's gymnasium looked like the site of a big slumber party last week, but the 174 "guests" went home soon after 9 p.m.Pupils hauled in inflatable furniture, beanbag chairs, pillows, blankets and lots of books and magazines for a Read-A-Thon that raised $6,000 in pledges for the school's visiting author and reading program.Parents helped distribute the essential snacks -- chips, sodas and cookies -- while pupils read from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m.Pupils and teachers are looking forward to a visit April 16 by Maryland author Mary Downing Hahn (known to many pupils for her book "Time For Andrew")
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | December 19, 1999
AS PARENTS scramble these days to locate the latest hot toy or trading cards, they face a dilemma:Do they allow their children to roughhouse with, say, a hard-to-find Beanie Baby, or do they store it away with tag intact in the hope that it's a ticket to early retirement or Johns Hopkins tuition for the kids?More and more adults -- and children -- are opting for the latter, collecting with an eye toward future value, collectible experts say.Rick Hubata, owner of the Dugoutzone collectible superstore in Ellicott City, says he discourages children from buying with profit in mind.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2004
Perhaps inevitably, the fun of collecting and trading Beanie Babies gave way to greed, sharp dealing and crime. Counterfeiting became a big enough business to attract the attention of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and result in several federal indictments. And there was at least one killing connected to the craze. In October 1999, Jeffrey White, then 29, shot security guard Harry Simmons, 63, at a lumberyard in Elkins, W.Va, a small town where people used to line up at 4 a.m. outside the Hallmark store when a Beanie Babies shipment was due. Police said that White, who later confessed to the crime, blamed Simmons for getting him fired from his job at the lumberyard.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | December 19, 1999
AS PARENTS scramble these days to locate the latest hot toy or trading cards, they face a dilemma:Do they allow their children to roughhouse with, say, a hard-to-find Beanie Baby, or do they store it away with tag intact in the hope that it's a ticket to early retirement or Johns Hopkins tuition for the kids?More and more adults -- and children -- are opting for the latter, collecting with an eye toward future value, collectible experts say.Rick Hubata, owner of the Dugoutzone collectible superstore in Ellicott City, says he discourages children from buying with profit in mind.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
A 28-year-old Sykesville man pleaded guilty Friday in Carroll County Circuit Court in a scheme to steal about $2,600 from people who ordered Beanie Babies from him on the Internet last year -- keeping their money without supplying the popular stuffed toys.Glen Howard Brown of the 5900 block of Dale Court acknowledged stealing amounts ranging from $125 to $400 from 13 families between Feb. 2 and May 1 by posting an advertisement with his computer. Fourteen charges were dropped in return for his guilty plea.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
A Sykesville man who failed to appear for trial in Carroll County on theft charges for allegedly bilking Beanie Baby customers on the Internet missed another court date yesterday because he has since been jailed in Baltimore County.Glen H. Brown, 27, of the 5900 block of Dale Court, did not appear yesterday because he wasn't brought from the Baltimore County Detention Center, said Assistant State's Attorney Clarence W. Beall III.The prosecutor asked Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. to rule that Brown had given up his right to a speedy trial by failing to appear in court March 15. Beall said any delay in the 180-day time limit for trial -- the so-called Hicks rule -- "has been caused by the defendant."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Carroll County nonprofits in need of money may be able to tap into the latest collector's craze to net big bucks. A group of local entrepreneurs is offering to help agencies raise money by holding Beanie Baby bingos.In recent months, the events have attracted hundreds of people and raised $1,500 for charity. The bingos are held at the Longwell Armory at 11 Longwell Ave."It's amazing how popular these bingos are," said Ronald J. Schroers, organizer of the bingos and city supervisor of Recreation and Activities for Westminster.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 1999
EAST MIDDLE School's gymnasium looked like the site of a big slumber party last week, but the 174 "guests" went home soon after 9 p.m.Pupils hauled in inflatable furniture, beanbag chairs, pillows, blankets and lots of books and magazines for a Read-A-Thon that raised $6,000 in pledges for the school's visiting author and reading program.Parents helped distribute the essential snacks -- chips, sodas and cookies -- while pupils read from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m.Pupils and teachers are looking forward to a visit April 16 by Maryland author Mary Downing Hahn (known to many pupils for her book "Time For Andrew")
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Westminster police collected 57 firearms yesterday in a Beanie Baby-for-guns exchange sponsored by two local merchants."The exchange was a huge success," said Sydney Shure, owner of "ideas, etc. toys etc. ltd.," an organizer of the event. "We thought we would get at least 100 guns. We didn't get 100, but we're still satisfied with what was turned in."Shure, 64, co-sponsored the exchange with Jeanette Gibby, who owns Gibby's Gifts and Miniatures, which operates out of Shure's store in the Route 140 Village Shopping Center.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2004
Perhaps inevitably, the fun of collecting and trading Beanie Babies gave way to greed, sharp dealing and crime. Counterfeiting became a big enough business to attract the attention of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and result in several federal indictments. And there was at least one killing connected to the craze. In October 1999, Jeffrey White, then 29, shot security guard Harry Simmons, 63, at a lumberyard in Elkins, W.Va, a small town where people used to line up at 4 a.m. outside the Hallmark store when a Beanie Babies shipment was due. Police said that White, who later confessed to the crime, blamed Simmons for getting him fired from his job at the lumberyard.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1999
Forget Beanies. A different Beany is heating up the Internet these days, as nostalgic baby boomers and new fans pursue out-of-print books about a freckled Denver teen-ager who ate pineapple nut sundaes at Downey's Drug Store and worried about her date for the Heart Hop.With the help of Internet auctions and Web sites that allow one to search hundreds of used-book stores with a single keystroke, avid reader-collectors are spending upward of $100 per title...
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 4, 1998
Sure, the Dow Jones industrial average is falling. World markets are in turmoil. But for the savvy investor, there's still one safe haven: Beanie Babies. Right?Well, maybe not. Just listen to this prospectus for the future of the sought-after stuffed animals from Harry L. Rinker, author of the "Official Guide to Collectibles":"A general feeling has developed that prices have reached the ridiculous level. ... A few years from now, their only value will be the ability to look nostalgically back on the craze and think 'If only I had sold then.
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