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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 1, 1999
The blacked-out Web site of Ty Inc., maker of Beanie Babies, gave way to a surprising announcement yesterday. The company apparently is retiring every single one of its Beanie Babies.The Ty site went black early yesterday. It returned hours later listing new toys to be released next month; at the end of the announcement it said without explanation: "VERY IMPORTANT NOTICE: On December 31, 1999 ... All Beanies will be retired ... including the above!"Ty was unavailable to confirm the Internet posting.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | October 27, 2011
The Arizona Cardinals, the Ravens' opponent on Sunday, listed four starters on their injury report as not having practiced Wednesday. They are running back Beanie Wells (knee), wide receiver Early Doucet (quad), outside linebacker Joey Porter (knee) and strong safety Adrian Wilson (foot). Of the four, Wells' absence could be the most significant. Wells leads the Cardinals in rushing in both carries (91) and yards (423), and he has scored a team-high six touchdowns. Wells told an Arizona radio station Wednesday morning that he planned to play against the Ravens, but coach Ken Whisenhunt wasn't quite as sure.
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NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | May 30, 1991
Levar Harris is 12 years old, and he covets a beanie cap with a propeller on top.Levar hovers near a table at East Madison Street and North Milton Avenue with two other 12-year-olds, Murrel Diggs and Tony Laws, who have beanie caps at home.On the table are tapes and yo-yos and boxes of M&Ms. But the fanciest, classiest, hippest and certainly most colorful item here are the beanie caps -- the current rage among teen-agers in Baltimore."Oh yeah," Levar says, "I want one of them. But I wouldn't kill somebody for one."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
I'll readily admit that I think the Furminator is one of the greatest pet gadgets ever invented. Have you ever tried one of them on a double-coated dog? Or a short-haired cat? It's crazy how much fur those things comb away. So you can imagine how excited I was when the FURminator people invented another product. The new gadget is called a FUR Dry. It's a wearable dog towel that the company promises will help people dry their dogs "effortlessly" with a "patented solution.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | June 27, 1991
Baltimore has become the beanie capital of the Western world, which would be bad enough if the fad were restricted to just kids. Kids'll wear anything. Kids even dress up as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.But here, adults wear beanies. Men in their 20s. Young men who -- or so you would think -- are out on the prowl, trying to impress young women.So, let me try to picture this.A guy gets up in the morning.He showers and shaves and slaps on the cologne.He slips into his designer sweat suit and slides on his designer athletic shoes.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | May 30, 1991
Once seen only on cartoon characters and nerdy inventors, the propeller-topped beanie has become the hippest -- make that the freshest -- headgear among black youths in Baltimore, who have launched a trend now spreading to other East Coast cities.In fact, the multicolored beanie has become so coveted that it, like Nike sneakers and leather jackets, already has figured in an alleged crime. A 10-year-old is charged with using a pistol to hold up a 9-year-old East Baltimore boy for his beanie.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Westminster police collected 57 firearms yesterday in a Beanie Baby-for-guns exchange sponsored by two local merchants."The exchange was a huge success," said Sydney Shure, owner of "ideas, etc. toys etc. ltd.," an organizer of the event. "We thought we would get at least 100 guns. We didn't get 100, but we're still satisfied with what was turned in."Shure, 64, co-sponsored the exchange with Jeanette Gibby, who owns Gibby's Gifts and Miniatures, which operates out of Shure's store in the Route 140 Village Shopping Center.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
A Sykesville man was freed yesterday on a $7,500 property bond after his arrest on charges of bilking Internet consumers from California to Massachusetts by falsely selling Beanie Babies.Glen H. Brown, 27, of the 5900 block of Dale Court was arrested Wednesday on a criminal information warrant, stipulating he be held without bond until yesterday's bail review in Carroll County Circuit Court.In court documents, prosecutors allege that between Feb. 2 and May 1, Brown advertised on the Internet that he was selling the small stuffed animals, considered valuable collectibles by many.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
A Sykesville man was freed yesterday on a $7,500 property bond after his arrest on charges of bilking Internet consumers from California to Massachusetts by falsely selling Beanie Babies.Glen H. Brown, 27, of the 5900 block of Dale Court was arrested Wednesday on a criminal information warrant, stipulating he be held without bond until yesterday's bail review in Carroll County Circuit Court.In court documents, prosecutors allege that between Feb. 2 and May 1, Brown advertised on the Internet that he was selling the small stuffed animals, considered valuable collectibles by many.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | May 18, 1991
East Baltimore's child crime problems continued yesterday afternoon as a 10-year-old boy was arrested for allegedly holding a gun to the head of a 9-year-old to rob him of a multicolored, propeller-topped beanie.The boy later said that he'd found the .22-caliber revolver the day before outside an abandoned house.Police said yesterday's incident occurred about 3 p.m. in the 1600 block of Spring Street as the 9-year-old boy was walking home from school with his 11-year-old sister. They were approached by a boy who attends their school, and he demanded the beanie, they told police.
SPORTS
By Kent Somers and Arizona Republic | October 26, 2011
What fans and media know about Beanie Wells' injured right knee fits in a medium-sized paragraph. Wells suffered the injury against the Steelers last Sunday and has swelling. The knee is "stable", according to coach Ken Whisenhunt, and Wells won't knee surgery. The unknown, however, takes several paragraphs to explore. We don't know what part of the knee is injured. We don't know what made the knee keep "locking up" on Sunday. Wells said it's not related to the knee surgery he underwent last season.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | December 2, 2006
This holiday season, the buzzword for hot toys is technology - from video consoles to digitized games to computerized stuffed toys. They're items that prompted gadget buffs to form long lines outside stores well before Thanksgiving. For some shoppers, that meant scant supply of items on Black Friday made for a bleak Friday. Such is the age of computerized entertainment, which has been steadily affecting the toy industry since the late 1990s. "What technology has done is change our idea of what is a toy," said Chris Byrne, analyst and co-editor of Toy Wishes magazine.
BUSINESS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Thomas S. Mulligan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2004
It was just an online classified ad, under Collectibles for Sale, but it sounded like a cry from the heart: "I'm tired of these things now. Please save me from them." Kelly Cabral of Tracy, Calif., placed the ad recently after coming across a box in her garage crammed with dozens and dozens of Beanie Babies, the floppy little stuffed animals that sparked an international trading frenzy in the late 1990s. Years earlier, there were days when Kelly and her husband, Dan, would join the early-morning crowds laying siege to gift shops that were expecting shipments of Beanies.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2004
Perhaps inevitably, the fun of collecting and trading Beanie Babies gave way to greed, sharp dealing and crime. Counterfeiting became a big enough business to attract the attention of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and result in several federal indictments. And there was at least one killing connected to the craze. In October 1999, Jeffrey White, then 29, shot security guard Harry Simmons, 63, at a lumberyard in Elkins, W.Va, a small town where people used to line up at 4 a.m. outside the Hallmark store when a Beanie Babies shipment was due. Police said that White, who later confessed to the crime, blamed Simmons for getting him fired from his job at the lumberyard.
NEWS
By Nadine Epstein | September 8, 2003
I RECENTLY was speaking with a childhood friend with whom I went to elementary school about 30 years ago. I was trying to persuade him to come to our class reunion, but he wasn't buying it. He complained about the bullying of those years. It's true, bullies ruled in our era, but things have changed since we played in schoolyards and backyards, resolving conflicts by the power of the fist. Children and how we bring them up are not the same. It may not be very noticeable to us, but I bet that 200 years from now social historians will look back at a revolution unfolding.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
Forget Y2K.Get ready for Ty2K.Ty Inc., manufacturers of the mushy plush animals known as Beanie Babies, wreaked their own millennial mayhem by announcing Tuesday that all current characters will be retired by year's end."The news is really a shot in the arm for the hobby," says Sharon Korbeck, editor of Toy Shop magazine. "This announcement is great for everyone."Internet sites are exploding with rumors -- and Beanie bids. Collectors clamor for dolls to fill out their collections. People are afraid.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
Forget Y2K.Get ready for Ty2K.Ty Inc., manufacturers of the mushy plush animals known as Beanie Babies, wreaked their own millennial mayhem by announcing Tuesday that all current characters will be retired by year's end."The news is really a shot in the arm for the hobby," says Sharon Korbeck, editor of Toy Shop magazine. "This announcement is great for everyone."Internet sites are exploding with rumors -- and Beanie bids. Collectors clamor for dolls to fill out their collections. People are afraid.
NEWS
June 10, 1998
H. L. MENCKEN would have understood the Beanie Baby craze."No one in this world . . . has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people," he wrote in 1926. That was seven decades before grown people went berserk over a line of cute but otherwise unexceptional beanbag animals that retail for $5 and, in terms of materials and workmanship, are worth maybe half that.McDonald's restaurants' current "Teeny Beanie" promotion is producing enough wasted Happy Meals to feed America's hungry.
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 1, 1999
The blacked-out Web site of Ty Inc., maker of Beanie Babies, gave way to a surprising announcement yesterday. The company apparently is retiring every single one of its Beanie Babies.The Ty site went black early yesterday. It returned hours later listing new toys to be released next month; at the end of the announcement it said without explanation: "VERY IMPORTANT NOTICE: On December 31, 1999 ... All Beanies will be retired ... including the above!"Ty was unavailable to confirm the Internet posting.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
A 28-year-old Sykesville man pleaded guilty Friday in Carroll County Circuit Court in a scheme to steal about $2,600 from people who ordered Beanie Babies from him on the Internet last year -- keeping their money without supplying the popular stuffed toys.Glen Howard Brown of the 5900 block of Dale Court acknowledged stealing amounts ranging from $125 to $400 from 13 families between Feb. 2 and May 1 by posting an advertisement with his computer. Fourteen charges were dropped in return for his guilty plea.
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