Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBean Salad
IN THE NEWS

Bean Salad

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
MC Savage from Baltimore said she is trying to find ways to get more nutrient-packed beans in her diet and was hoping for a recipe for a three-bean salad that was a little bit different from the classic versions that most commonly have a dressing made with vinegar, oil and sugar. Debbie Sullivan, also from Baltimore, shared a recipe for a Mexican-style bean salad that she thought Savage would enjoy. Her recipe includes chicken or turkey but she said it is equally good made without it. What's nice about this dish is that it comes together in minutes and is extremely adaptable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
MC Savage from Baltimore said she is trying to find ways to get more nutrient-packed beans in her diet and was hoping for a recipe for a three-bean salad that was a little bit different from the classic versions that most commonly have a dressing made with vinegar, oil and sugar. Debbie Sullivan, also from Baltimore, shared a recipe for a Mexican-style bean salad that she thought Savage would enjoy. Her recipe includes chicken or turkey but she said it is equally good made without it. What's nice about this dish is that it comes together in minutes and is extremely adaptable.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
Gloria Vermillion of North Canton, Ohio, requested a recipe for a bean salad. She wrote: "My husband and I enjoy the bean salad at Fisher Foods Inc. in North Canton. Could someone have the recipe?" Bonnie Hull of Williamsport, Md., responded with a recipe. "I believe this is the classic of bean salads," she wrote. Mixed-Bean Salad Makes 8 servings 1/2 cup vegetable oil 2/3 cup cider vinegar 3/4 cup sugar, or less, to taste 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper one 14- to 16-ounce can cut green beans, drained one 14- to 16-ounce can yellow waxed beans, drained one 14- to 16-ounce can red kidney beans, drained and rinsed to remove color 1 medium onion, chopped Mix oil and vinegar with sugar, salt and pepper.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Emilia Schwartz from Pasadena was looking for a recipe for a salad made with cannellini beans and other ingredients that she said she got some years back when she belonged to Weight Watchers. Bonnie Besche from Baltimore sent in a bean salad recipe she found in her "Weight Watchers Simply the Best" cookbook and thinks it may be the one that Schwartz is in search of. The recipe comes from Sheryl Knuth of Omaha, Neb., and in the note that precedes her recipe she says that she especially likes this one because it helps encourage good eating habits in her children.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 27, 2005
Pork has a lot going for it: It cooks up quickly, it's a good source of protein and it's relatively low in calories. Boneless pork chops, like the ones used in this recipe, are cut from the front of the center loin. If you choose to use bone-in pork chops for this dish, you will get the added luxury of a small chunk of the tenderloin next to the T-bone. Be sure to add three to five minutes' extra cooking time, however. A tangy salsa and three-bean salad add flair and color to the plate.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Mary Massimino of Springdale, Ark., is seeking a recipe for a squash casserole "like the one served at Pete and Repeat's place in Fort Smith, Ark." Derelle Wynn of Hot Springs, S.D., responded with her version. Squash Casserole Makes 8 servings 6 to 7 summer squash, diced 2 carrots, grated 1 stick butter 1 can cream of chicken soup 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream 1 1/2 to 2 cups grated American cheese 1 1/4 cups Pepperidge Farm stuffing mix In a large saucepan, cook first three ingredients until almost tender, about 4 minutes.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | August 11, 1993
The first thing that makes bean salads irresistible on hot summer days is that you can avoid the long, slow simmer bysimply using a can opener.Precooked canned beans may not seem a fashionable start to a recipe, but when tossed with crisp vegetables and lots of herbs the result is delicious. All canned beans require is a quick rinse in a sieve to wash away the salt that canning companies love to add.There are other good reasons for favoring these bean salads. Consider the economics of bean nutrition: Two cans of beans, yielding a salad that serves four, cost less than $2. That small sum buys complex carbohydrates, assorted vitamins, iron and other minerals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | October 16, 1992
For all you readers who love funky little restaurants, this one's for you. All others, stop here.Actually Java Blues can hardly be called a restaurant. It's a coffeehouse par excellence, with loads of atmosphere, espresso and cappuccino, sweets and great breads. (But then as faithful readers know, I'm extremely partial to the Stone Mill Bakery, Java Blues' source for breads and rolls.)Owners Ed and Vini Meyers do offer lunch, early supper and carryout food -- a wacky menu that changes from day to day. The first time I went for lunch it was a little after 1 p.m. and there was no more quiche and no more shrimp and vegetable salad left.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
Here comes summer!Memorial Day marks the beginning of the out-of-doors season, and that means cookouts and picnics.It also means short shorts and bathing suits. Talk about approach-avoidance.If you're among the folks who are feeling body-conscious, try this for your summer game plan: Love your body.* Buy comfortable shorts and T-shirts with relaxed coverage, then find a bathing suit consultant who'll help you choose the suit most flattering to your shape.* Commit to get fit with a flair.Get out and enjoy the long daylight hours.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Emilia Schwartz from Pasadena was looking for a recipe for a salad made with cannellini beans and other ingredients that she said she got some years back when she belonged to Weight Watchers. Bonnie Besche from Baltimore sent in a bean salad recipe she found in her "Weight Watchers Simply the Best" cookbook and thinks it may be the one that Schwartz is in search of. The recipe comes from Sheryl Knuth of Omaha, Neb., and in the note that precedes her recipe she says that she especially likes this one because it helps encourage good eating habits in her children.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 27, 2005
Pork has a lot going for it: It cooks up quickly, it's a good source of protein and it's relatively low in calories. Boneless pork chops, like the ones used in this recipe, are cut from the front of the center loin. If you choose to use bone-in pork chops for this dish, you will get the added luxury of a small chunk of the tenderloin next to the T-bone. Be sure to add three to five minutes' extra cooking time, however. A tangy salsa and three-bean salad add flair and color to the plate.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
Gloria Vermillion of North Canton, Ohio, requested a recipe for a bean salad. She wrote: "My husband and I enjoy the bean salad at Fisher Foods Inc. in North Canton. Could someone have the recipe?" Bonnie Hull of Williamsport, Md., responded with a recipe. "I believe this is the classic of bean salads," she wrote. Mixed-Bean Salad Makes 8 servings 1/2 cup vegetable oil 2/3 cup cider vinegar 3/4 cup sugar, or less, to taste 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper one 14- to 16-ounce can cut green beans, drained one 14- to 16-ounce can yellow waxed beans, drained one 14- to 16-ounce can red kidney beans, drained and rinsed to remove color 1 medium onion, chopped Mix oil and vinegar with sugar, salt and pepper.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Mary Massimino of Springdale, Ark., is seeking a recipe for a squash casserole "like the one served at Pete and Repeat's place in Fort Smith, Ark." Derelle Wynn of Hot Springs, S.D., responded with her version. Squash Casserole Makes 8 servings 6 to 7 summer squash, diced 2 carrots, grated 1 stick butter 1 can cream of chicken soup 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream 1 1/2 to 2 cups grated American cheese 1 1/4 cups Pepperidge Farm stuffing mix In a large saucepan, cook first three ingredients until almost tender, about 4 minutes.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | October 13, 2002
I love potlucks, so when an invitation to one organized by my women's investment group arrived, I immediately began thinking of what I might prepare. Unlike some, our hostess made no requests for specific dishes such as vegetables, salads or desserts. "Bring what you'd like," she enthusiastically wrote in her e-mail. Although I never mind being assigned a particular food, I was delighted to have carte blanche this time. I did keep a couple of things in mind. There would be close to a dozen attending our meeting, so a recipe that could feed a crowd was important, and since the host's home was several miles away the dish had to be one that could be transported easily.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 19, 1999
I love lobster, but typically I buy this expensive shellfish only for special occasions. However, at the end of the summer, my local supermarket sells these crustaceans at the lowest prices of the year.As a cook, I can never resist this temptation. This past week, for example, we had an overnight guest arriving for a short visit, so I decided to buy lobsters for our dinner. To save time, I had the lobsters cooked at the store, a service many fish departments in groceries now offer.At home, I used the lobsters in a main-course salad, which was reminiscent of one I had sampled earlier in the summer at the two-star Parisian restaurant, Michel Rostang.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | August 11, 1993
The first thing that makes bean salads irresistible on hot summer days is that you can avoid the long, slow simmer bysimply using a can opener.Precooked canned beans may not seem a fashionable start to a recipe, but when tossed with crisp vegetables and lots of herbs the result is delicious. All canned beans require is a quick rinse in a sieve to wash away the salt that canning companies love to add.There are other good reasons for favoring these bean salads. Consider the economics of bean nutrition: Two cans of beans, yielding a salad that serves four, cost less than $2. That small sum buys complex carbohydrates, assorted vitamins, iron and other minerals.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | October 13, 2002
I love potlucks, so when an invitation to one organized by my women's investment group arrived, I immediately began thinking of what I might prepare. Unlike some, our hostess made no requests for specific dishes such as vegetables, salads or desserts. "Bring what you'd like," she enthusiastically wrote in her e-mail. Although I never mind being assigned a particular food, I was delighted to have carte blanche this time. I did keep a couple of things in mind. There would be close to a dozen attending our meeting, so a recipe that could feed a crowd was important, and since the host's home was several miles away the dish had to be one that could be transported easily.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 19, 1999
I love lobster, but typically I buy this expensive shellfish only for special occasions. However, at the end of the summer, my local supermarket sells these crustaceans at the lowest prices of the year.As a cook, I can never resist this temptation. This past week, for example, we had an overnight guest arriving for a short visit, so I decided to buy lobsters for our dinner. To save time, I had the lobsters cooked at the store, a service many fish departments in groceries now offer.At home, I used the lobsters in a main-course salad, which was reminiscent of one I had sampled earlier in the summer at the two-star Parisian restaurant, Michel Rostang.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
Here comes summer!Memorial Day marks the beginning of the out-of-doors season, and that means cookouts and picnics.It also means short shorts and bathing suits. Talk about approach-avoidance.If you're among the folks who are feeling body-conscious, try this for your summer game plan: Love your body.* Buy comfortable shorts and T-shirts with relaxed coverage, then find a bathing suit consultant who'll help you choose the suit most flattering to your shape.* Commit to get fit with a flair.Get out and enjoy the long daylight hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | October 16, 1992
For all you readers who love funky little restaurants, this one's for you. All others, stop here.Actually Java Blues can hardly be called a restaurant. It's a coffeehouse par excellence, with loads of atmosphere, espresso and cappuccino, sweets and great breads. (But then as faithful readers know, I'm extremely partial to the Stone Mill Bakery, Java Blues' source for breads and rolls.)Owners Ed and Vini Meyers do offer lunch, early supper and carryout food -- a wacky menu that changes from day to day. The first time I went for lunch it was a little after 1 p.m. and there was no more quiche and no more shrimp and vegetable salad left.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.