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NEWS
May 1, 2009
On April 25, 2009, DELOIS A. BEAMON-WHITE. Funeral Service will be held at Howell Funeral Home Chapel, 10220 Guilford Rd, Jessup, MD on Saturday, May 2nd, 2009 at 10 A.M. Interment private. Inquiries (301) 604-0101.
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NEWS
May 1, 2009
On April 25, 2009, DELOIS A. BEAMON-WHITE. Funeral Service will be held at Howell Funeral Home Chapel, 10220 Guilford Rd, Jessup, MD on Saturday, May 2nd, 2009 at 10 A.M. Interment private. Inquiries (301) 604-0101.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 20, 2000
Tiger Woods' 15-stroke victory in the U.S. Open on Sunday ranks with the all-time individual performances in sport. So says Frank Deford, commentator for National Public Radio and a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. Deford, a Baltimore native, likens Woods'golf feat to near-mythic efforts of athletes like Bob Beamon, Don Larsen and Secretariat. "It's awfully hard to determine majesty, but what Woods did was so supreme, so mouth-watering, it took your breath away," Deford said. "If the [four-day]
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 3, 2008
You can have your superhero movies. I met a man who could fly without a cape. "It's been a long time since I've been in Baltimore. I jumped here once. Can't remember where exactly." Bob Beamon paused, snapped out of his internal time-traveling by a sudden realization. He slapped me lightly on the shoulder as he laughed. "You weren't even born when I was jumping, were you?" No, I sheepishly admitted. But I sure wish I had been. Bob Beamon defines Olympic greatness the way Bill Shakespeare defines Elizabethan literature.
SPORTS
By Randy Harvey and Randy Harvey,Los Angeles Times | August 31, 1991
TOKYO -- It was inevitable that one of the most durable records in sports, Bob Beamon's long jump of 29 feet, 2 1/2 inches in the 1968 Olympic Games at Mexico City, eventually would be broken. It was even predictable, considering the favorable conditions at the National Stadium, that it would happen here in track and field's World Championships.But the assumption by the sport's followers for almost a decade was that when the record finally fell, it would be at the fleet feet of the most consistently excellent performer in the event's history, two-time Olympic and world champion Carl Lewis.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun Reporter | March 29, 2007
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Twelve years old. That's how young Michael Phelps estimated he was the last time he cut as much as 1.62 seconds off his personal best with one swim. That's what 12-year-old swimmers are supposed to do. They're awkward, lanky and have high-pitched voices, inconsistent technique and little muscle definition. They're just learning, growing into their bodies, so it's possible to shave big chunks off their personal best in an event like the 200-meter butterfly, where anything approaching 2 minutes, 30 seconds would, at age 12, be considered exceptional.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 11, 2000
BOB BEAMON sprinted down the long-jump track in the rarefied air of Mexico City that autumn of 1968, hitting the board and leaping high into the air. He landed on both feet, then fell forward. He waited while the Olympic judges measured his effort. When the official word came down, it was determined that Beamon had jumped some 2 inches beyond 29 feet. He had broken the world record by more than 2 feet. Once he realized the magnitude of what he'd done, Beamon slumped to his knees. He put both hands to his face and wept.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Contributing Writer | September 10, 1994
Poly's standard I-formation offense might not be that exciting to watch, but the No. 3 Engineers proved again yesterday that it can be productive as they grinded their way to a 33-6 win over unranked Mervo in a season-opener for both teams."
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- I don't believe in the Roadrunner anymore. I loved watching his cartoons as a kid, but now I think he must have used performance-enhancing drugs.Same goes for Superman. Clark Kent was on the juice, no doubt about it.I have been at the Olympics for two weeks. It is a land of metal detectors and drug tests. Nobody is assumed to be clean. Everybody is suspect.Last night was a great night for American track. The field wasn't bad either.Americans won four gold, two silver and two bronze medals.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A month later, Carl Lewis still calls it the greatest meet of his life -- yes, even better than his four gold medal performance at the 1984 Olympics. But the average American track and field fan remembers the World Championships in Tokyo for one thing, and one thing only: Mike Powell's world record in the long jump.The record should belong to Lewis, and probably will belong to Lewis, maybe even before the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. Fraction by fraction he inched toward Bob Beamon's mark, but it was Powell who finally made the spectacular 23-year leap forward.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun Reporter | March 29, 2007
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Twelve years old. That's how young Michael Phelps estimated he was the last time he cut as much as 1.62 seconds off his personal best with one swim. That's what 12-year-old swimmers are supposed to do. They're awkward, lanky and have high-pitched voices, inconsistent technique and little muscle definition. They're just learning, growing into their bodies, so it's possible to shave big chunks off their personal best in an event like the 200-meter butterfly, where anything approaching 2 minutes, 30 seconds would, at age 12, be considered exceptional.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 20, 2000
Tiger Woods' 15-stroke victory in the U.S. Open on Sunday ranks with the all-time individual performances in sport. So says Frank Deford, commentator for National Public Radio and a senior writer for Sports Illustrated. Deford, a Baltimore native, likens Woods'golf feat to near-mythic efforts of athletes like Bob Beamon, Don Larsen and Secretariat. "It's awfully hard to determine majesty, but what Woods did was so supreme, so mouth-watering, it took your breath away," Deford said. "If the [four-day]
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 11, 2000
BOB BEAMON sprinted down the long-jump track in the rarefied air of Mexico City that autumn of 1968, hitting the board and leaping high into the air. He landed on both feet, then fell forward. He waited while the Olympic judges measured his effort. When the official word came down, it was determined that Beamon had jumped some 2 inches beyond 29 feet. He had broken the world record by more than 2 feet. Once he realized the magnitude of what he'd done, Beamon slumped to his knees. He put both hands to his face and wept.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Staff Writer | September 24, 1994
Dunbar junior linebacker Tommy Polley stood near midfield at Poly's stadium acting as if he owned the place. He spoke confidently as he looked up at the scoreboard, which read: Dunbar 26, Poly 6."I said we would win and my prediction came true," said Polley, a second-team All-Metro pick. "The name of the game today was big plays and defense."Sparked by sophomore Alli Culpepper's game-opening 93-yard kickoff return for a 6-0 lead, coupled with the explosive running of Loyola transfer Reggie Boyce (six carries, 112 yards, one touchdown)
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Contributing Writer | September 10, 1994
Poly's standard I-formation offense might not be that exciting to watch, but the No. 3 Engineers proved again yesterday that it can be productive as they grinded their way to a 33-6 win over unranked Mervo in a season-opener for both teams."
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- I don't believe in the Roadrunner anymore. I loved watching his cartoons as a kid, but now I think he must have used performance-enhancing drugs.Same goes for Superman. Clark Kent was on the juice, no doubt about it.I have been at the Olympics for two weeks. It is a land of metal detectors and drug tests. Nobody is assumed to be clean. Everybody is suspect.Last night was a great night for American track. The field wasn't bad either.Americans won four gold, two silver and two bronze medals.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Staff Writer | September 24, 1994
Dunbar junior linebacker Tommy Polley stood near midfield at Poly's stadium acting as if he owned the place. He spoke confidently as he looked up at the scoreboard, which read: Dunbar 26, Poly 6."I said we would win and my prediction came true," said Polley, a second-team All-Metro pick. "The name of the game today was big plays and defense."Sparked by sophomore Alli Culpepper's game-opening 93-yard kickoff return for a 6-0 lead, coupled with the explosive running of Loyola transfer Reggie Boyce (six carries, 112 yards, one touchdown)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
On a September night in 1991, in a Tokyo stadium, in a world-championship long jump competition against the greatest track and field athlete of the past half-century, Mike Powell floated beyond the bounds of his sport.He leaped 29 feet, 4 1/2 inches.He erased a 23-year-old world record of 29-2 1/2 established by Bob Beamon in the high altitude of Mexico City at the 1968 Summer Olympics.He beat Carl Lewis.Ten months later, Powell is a millionaire, a worldwide star who commands $50,000 for merely appearing at a meet, a celebrity who can no longer walk unnoticed down a city street or jump unbothered into a pit of sand.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
On a September night in 1991, in a Tokyo stadium, in a world-championship long jump competition against the greatest track and field athlete of the past half-century, Mike Powell floated beyond the bounds of his sport.He leaped 29 feet, 4 1/2 inches.He erased a 23-year-old world record of 29-2 1/2 established by Bob Beamon in the high altitude of Mexico City at the 1968 Summer Olympics.He beat Carl Lewis.Ten months later, Powell is a millionaire, a worldwide star who commands $50,000 for merely appearing at a meet, a celebrity who can no longer walk unnoticed down a city street or jump unbothered into a pit of sand.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A month later, Carl Lewis still calls it the greatest meet of his life -- yes, even better than his four gold medal performance at the 1984 Olympics. But the average American track and field fan remembers the World Championships in Tokyo for one thing, and one thing only: Mike Powell's world record in the long jump.The record should belong to Lewis, and probably will belong to Lewis, maybe even before the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona. Fraction by fraction he inched toward Bob Beamon's mark, but it was Powell who finally made the spectacular 23-year leap forward.
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