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NEWS
June 25, 2006
On June 20, 2006, MARY D.; devoted mother of six daughters, Helen Mitchell, Carllota Robinson, Janice Miller, Venessa Beads, Myra Hamilton and Valarie Walker; three sons, Jared Beads, Carl Beads and Don Beads. She is also survived by a host of grand and great-grandchildren and other relatives. Friends may call at the Gary P. March Funeral Home, 270 Fred Hilton Pass, on Sunday from 12 noon until 7 P.M. Family will receive friends at Mt. Winans UMC, 2501 Hollins Ferry Road, Monday 10:30 A.M. to 11 A.M. Funeral services to follow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | October 29, 2013
I'm on a mission to revel in as much of autumn's bounty as I can. Yes, I said "autumn's bounty. " Can you blame me? It took this season long enough to get here. So in celebration, I (my taste buds, really) am devouring apples and spice and any and everything associated with the crisp, tart fall goodness one can find at Baltimore area farmers' markets. That especially means cider. I could bathe in cider … but I'll spare you that tale. I also like to bake with it, marinade things in it, and I especially enjoy imbibing a few dozen cocktails mixed with the alcoholic variety.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | April 28, 2002
Robin Papadopoulos once traveled the world, first as a flight attendant for Pan American Airlines and then as a guide on tours of the Far East, Central America and the Baltic. The Northern Lights and the South Pacific, too. Name the destination and she probably has a luggage stamp from there. She met her husband on a cruise -- he was the captain -- and their courtship took place on board during a string of cruises. When they had their first child, she created a floating family life. (It didn't go well.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
Jazz Age clothing reflects the Art Deco emphasis on geometric lines, according to Cindi Ryland, owner of Retropolitan in Annapolis, who shared her tips for what to wear. Women should look for dresses with pronounced dropped waists with no darts in the bust line. When checking the condition of a 1920s dress, pay attention to the shoulders, which might show damage from years of storage on a hanger. This need not be a deal-breaker; sometimes repairs can be made. No zippers for men or women; buttons, please.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | June 23, 2006
Researchers say they have discovered the oldest beads ever used for decorative purposes - a finding that pushes back the date for the dawn of modern human culture by 25,000 years. Detailed analysis of beads made from mollusk shells that were dug up years ago in Israel and Algeria show that they were probably hand carved about 100,000 years ago, researchers say. They also are similar to beads believed to be about 75,000 years old that were discovered several years ago. They were at an archaeological site known as the Blombos Cave on the coast of the Indian Ocean in South Africa.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | March 30, 2007
In the social hall of St. John Neumann Church, Kathleen Loor takes the loose ends of a rosary knot and dips them into the flame of a votive candle. The ends scorch into black nubs, sealing the string of prayer beads together. The durable rosaries made of parachute cord and Army green, navy blue and black beads are headed to military training bases, hospitals and combat zones in Afghanistan and Iraq. They have a special meaning for the troops who receive them. In Parris Island, S.C., Marine recruits - even non-Catholics - snatch them up as quickly as they arrive, said Father Gabriel Mensah, the recruit training regimental chaplain.
NEWS
By ANNE TALLENT and ANNE TALLENT,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
WHEN OTHER WOMEN compliment Robin Clemmons on her jewelry, she doesn't give them the name of a designer boutique where she bought the imaginative works. Instead, she is proud to say she made them herself. "The Lord doesn't have to hit you over the head too many times" with such comments to realize you have a skill worth capitalizing on, said the 49-year-old Woodbridge, Va., resident, who now sells her works in two shops. She and other members of the Baltimore-based Damali Bead Collective find joy, self-expression and even something entrepreneurial in the colorful world of beads.
FEATURES
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1998
For those long car trips, rainy days at the cabin, or lazy August afternoons by the pool, there's nothing that cheers a bored child like a bit of creative crafting.This summer, parents can't go wrong if they pack lots of round pony beads and ribbon into their suitcases, beach bags and totes. This summer's hottest craft is the Beady Buddy or Beady Baby, a little creature made by threading beads onto ribbons.Boys and girls of all ages love to collect the beads ` which can shimmer, glitter or glow in the dark ` and store them in the compartments of plastic embroidery-floss cases.
NEWS
By FRED RASMUSSEN and FRED RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
For Jared R. Beads, the Westport marathon runner known as the "human running machine," taking a daily 26-mile run was as much a part of his normal routine as eating breakfast, going to work and spending time with his family.Mr. Beads, in "The Guinness Book of Records" for five years for having the longest nonstop run, died Saturday at Frederick Villas Nursing Center in Catonsville of complications from a stroke suffered several years ago. He was 68.The familiar runner, who seemed to be all over the city at once in his running prime, was known not only for his unconventional approach to the sport but for his persistence as well.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | October 6, 1991
For years jewelry-maker Penny Diamanti hoped that someone would open up the kind of store she longed to shop in: an extravaganza of beads from all over the world plus jewelry, textiles and crafts -- a tidy little version of a bazaar you could imagine somewhere along the East Indian trade routes.She finally got tired of waiting and two years ago opened Beadazzled on Connecticut Avenue in Washington.Now she and her partner, husband Erik de Widt, have brought Beadazzled to Baltimore. Just two weeks ago they opened the new shop in a bright and airy building -- a former bank -- at the corner of Charles and Franklin streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013
Stacy Keibler's appearance Sunday evening on the arm of George Clooney confirmed two things: 1. They're still an item; 2. She still adheres to a serious fitness routine. Keibler wore a beaded Naeem Khan gown and, according to Us Weekly, Giuseppe Zanotti shoes, Lorraine Schwartz jewels and a Tiffany & Co bag. The sophisticated, silver-and-black dress and her short, softly waved hair evoked a '20s flapper mood, far removed from the metallic gold, strapless gown she wore last year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Steve LaPlanche - "Sports Steve" to his friends - says he hasn't missed a professional football game played in Baltimore since 1956. His streak, he says proudly, is 358 games and counting. "I started going when I was 3, and I haven't missed a Baltimore home game since then," said LaPlanche, 59. "Ever since I was born, sports was like a magnet to me. I've lived and slept sports. " But LaPlanche, whose loyalty has lasted through Baltimore's NFL Colts, USFL Stars and CFL Stallions before settling on the Ravens, isn't simply a dedicated fan. He also makes a proud spectacle of himself at every home game with an intricate homemade getup.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2012
Some 700 miles away from home, Center Stage intern Meghan O'Rourke still got to celebrate her Irish heritage in Baltimore. She missed out on a family tradition Sunday — Chicago's South Side Irish Parade — but Baltimore's St. Patrick's Day Parade meant she didn't have to miss out on St. Paddy's festivities. She and others lined up Sunday along Charles Street to take in dance troupes, marching bands, flag corps, bagpipe brigades, antique fire trucks and classic cars. Miss Maryland and Miss Teen Maryland USA waved to onlookers, and a group of dogs sporting green top hats passed by. O'Rourke enjoyed seeing the dancers step their way down the parade route.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | June 6, 2011
Maryland-made one-of-a-kind art, jewelry and other unique items stock the shelves at love & glitter - a boutique on Main Street in Historic Ellicott City. “Everything in the store is handmade,” says owner Leslie Putman. She and her husband, co-owner Andrew, add to the inventory with their own jewelry designs, which she says entail “sparkle, shine, glitter and glitz.” “Our jewelry has resin with charms and beads for sparkle, glass and found images of one-of-a-kind for the shine, one-of-a-kind microglitter, and washers - hardware wrapped with beads and colored artist's wire - for the glitz,” she summarizes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Fourteen years after Mother Teresa's last visit to Baltimore, her blood, her hair and several of her personal effects returned to the city Wednesday. The items, which also include a rosary and sandals worn by the candidate for Catholic sainthood, were displayed for several hours at the hospice for AIDS patients she opened in East Baltimore in 1992. In the chapel at the Gift of Hope hospice on Ashland Avenue, operated by Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity, Shirley Sapp paused before the frayed shoes.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | February 21, 2010
Makayla Gilliam-Price woke on Jan. 13 to see television images of the earthquake that had devastated Haiti the evening before, and the 11-year-old was overwhelmed by the pictures of destruction and suffering. "I remember waking up and seeing all these terrible pictures and seeing people crying and screaming and thinking that if I were in the situation, I would want every single person in the world to help me, and I need them fast," said the Calvert School middle-schooler. So she came up with the idea of making and selling beaded bracelets to raise money to send to the suffering people of Haiti.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | November 4, 1994
Karin Birch first embraced fiber art six years ago with a whimsical painting she titled "Ode to Housework."She affixed tiny beads to the canvas in the shape of irons -- and rather fancied the results."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1997
Eleven women sat in a circle on a shaded carport in Glen Burnie yesterday morning, sipping unsugared iced tea and threading shiny beads onto string.Since 1963, these members of Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church's Rosary-Making Guild have strung thousands of rosaries for children in Anne Arundel churches and for priests and missionaries in such places as Oregon, Alaska, Taiwan and Haiti.Within weeks, the beads they strung yesterday will be halfway around the world in the Philippines."It's nice to know that you're making something that's going thousands of miles away, and someone's going to learn to pray on your rosary," said Marcy Curtiss, 60, of Pasadena.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2008
In August 2006, Phyllis Penn began making bracelets to raise money for cancer awareness. A few months later, Penn asked Sharon Meissner to join her fundraising efforts. Penn spends six months of the year in Florida and wanted someone to carry on with the bracelets, she said. Although she had never made a bracelet, Meissner agreed to do it. "My husband died of cancer 20 years ago, and my daughter has had cancer twice," said Meissner, of Bel Air. "And everyone in Phyllis' family, including Phyllis, has had cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
Mardi Gras beads were on the bars and pulsing beats were in the air Friday night at the new Bourbon Street super-club. It was Ladies Night, which meant women got in and drank for free. Bourbon Street was primed for partying; all that was missing were the people. At 11 p.m., Baltimore's newest mega-club was less than a third full. I scratched my head and hoped it was a fluke, because Bourbon Street has a lot going for it. True to its history, the building (which formerly housed Hammerjack's)
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