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NEWS
June 23, 2010
Last Thursday the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in Stop The Beach Renourishment, Inc. v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, which addresses whether a beach replenishment program constitutes an impermissible "taking" within the meaning of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. It sounds like an obscure question only of interest to those lucky enough to own beachfront property in the Sunshine State, but in fact, it could have a significant impact on how Maryland and other states respond to the threat of rising sea levels.
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NEWS
April 19, 2013
In the off-season, Ocean City often adds some new feature for tourists: a miniature golf course perhaps, a seafood restaurant or maybe a bar that caters to the beachgoing crowd. But here's a possible addition that might not be so welcome - parking meters north of 10 t h Street. On Friday, the Ocean City Council is expected to be briefed on a proposal to create a whopping 4,800 paid parking spaces. The most ambitious version of the plan would require visitors to pay for parking at any space along the streets on the Atlantic Ocean side of Coastal Highway from 10 t h Street to the Delaware line.
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
As Hurricane Felix stalls along the Atlantic coast and threatens to erode the shore with pounding surf and rain, critics question the value of mid-Atlantic beach replenishment projects that have cost federal taxpayers at least $500 million during the past decade.At issue is whether dumping millions of tons of sand on erosion-prone beaches is a wasteful boon to coastal landowners, or whether shorefront real estate and the tax revenue it generates are worth the effort.Congressional representatives and the Army Corps of Engineers say the projects are well worth the money in states such as Maryland, with its prized Ocean City resort.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
Last Thursday the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in Stop The Beach Renourishment, Inc. v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, which addresses whether a beach replenishment program constitutes an impermissible "taking" within the meaning of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. It sounds like an obscure question only of interest to those lucky enough to own beachfront property in the Sunshine State, but in fact, it could have a significant impact on how Maryland and other states respond to the threat of rising sea levels.
NEWS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Contributing Writer | May 10, 1992
At Pier Amusements on the beach, a few of the rides are already spinning as construction workers drive pilings and hammer beams to rebuild 100 feet of pier swept away by winter storms.Across town, employees at Jolly Roger are planting 200 palm trees to replace those that died in the winter storms.And on the beach itself, Ocean City is gearing up for another sand replenishment program, one much smaller than the massive, three-year, $40-million project that is being credited with saving this ocean resort from an estimated $50 million in real estate damage.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 15, 1994
Ocean City -- It's Mother Nature vs. Ocean City. Again.Mother Nature wants to take about two feet of this resort city's beach every year through erosion. The city wants to keep it."We're not going to just let it wash into the sea!" says Nancy Howard, spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.So, for the next two months, the city will put back what Mother Nature is using the Atlantic Ocean to take away: A hopper dredge called (appropriately) the Long Island will make two trips a day, bringing 11,000 cubic yards of sand from about three miles offshore, then dumping it onto the beach.
NEWS
April 4, 2010
OCEAN CITY - Beach replenishment planned for the spring in Ocean City is being put off until after the summer because of delays by the Army Corps of Engineers. City Engineer Terry McGean said the bidding process was long and a contract was not awarded in time. He said the Army Corps worked hard, but its contract bids would not have been awarded until mid-May. Workers would have been pumping sand through August on that schedule. The city decided it had been able to patch its eroded sand dunes enough to get through the summer.
NEWS
January 8, 1992
Six out of 10 callers to SUNDIAL say money should not continue to be spent on beach replenishment at Ocean City. Of 560 callers, 337 (60 percent) are against the program, while 223 callers (39 percent) would continue the replenishment effort."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as a scientific public opinion poll would be.
NEWS
February 5, 1992
Any day now, the federal government will decide whether it will pick up the full $12.2 million cost of repairing storm damage to Ocean City's beach replenishment project or whether the state will have to contribute up to 35 percent. Even if Washington pays the full tab this time around, it seems inevitable that the federal government will be less and less reliable as a ready source of funding for such expensive projects.Regardless of the federal government's decision, funds for this round of repairs are assured.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | February 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The federal government will pay $8.8 million of the estimated $12.2 million needed to reconstruct the storm-ravaged Ocean City beach, leaving state and local governments responsible for the rest, officials said yesterday.The $3.4 million local share of the project to rebuild dunes and beach will come from an existing $8 million state and local beach repair fund, and will not require cash-strapped local governments to scramble for the money.Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Baltimore said they expect to hire a contractor by the end of March to pump sand from offshore to restore 8.5 miles of beach and dune damaged by a Jan. 4 storm.
NEWS
April 4, 2010
OCEAN CITY - Beach replenishment planned for the spring in Ocean City is being put off until after the summer because of delays by the Army Corps of Engineers. City Engineer Terry McGean said the bidding process was long and a contract was not awarded in time. He said the Army Corps worked hard, but its contract bids would not have been awarded until mid-May. Workers would have been pumping sand through August on that schedule. The city decided it had been able to patch its eroded sand dunes enough to get through the summer.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
OCEAN CITY - Carl Zimmerman remembers walking along the northern tip of Assateague National Seashore wondering how long it might be before the next big storm literally split the barrier island, a wind- swept 37-mile-long sliver of sand and marsh. But the brutal nor'easters that pounded the island in the winter of 1998 - stubborn squalls that pushed ocean waves into Sinepuxent Bay and brought reporters and politicians scurrying down for a look - sounded an alarm for the government to begin tackling a problem that engineers have warned about for almost 40 years.
NEWS
By Amy S. Rosenberg and Amy S. Rosenberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 14, 2001
CAPE MAY, N.J. - Well, it's about that time again at the scenic Cove Restaurant, when winter is receding and Ed Johnston begins the process of opening up his little beachfront restaurant for the season at the western tip of this seaside town. It's time for Ed to start shoveling sand. Mountains of it have blown onto his property, making his place look like the day after a blizzard. The sand covers his parking lot, drifts up along his boarded-up deck, blows against the door, jams the lock, creeps through the door threshold all the way into the restaurant, where little cone-shaped piles of sand sit on the tables.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- After an anxious week of weather watching, merchants and city officials at Maryland's beach resort think they have dodged another Atlantic storm.Now they are beginning to turn their attention to the bottom line -- how much the gray skies, high winds and pounding surf churned up by wayward Hurricane Dennis will affect the turnout for Labor Day weekend.Yesterday, as Dennis was downgraded to a tropical storm and meandered south, again threatening the North Carolina coast, Ocean City officials relaxed their vigil.
NEWS
March 9, 1998
Aiding dyslexics could become lifetime habitAfter reading Sara Engram's column "Rescuing dyslexics by breaking the code" (March 1), I couldn't resist putting in my two cents' worth.MADAY -- Maryland Associates for Dyslexic Adults and Youths Inc. -- is a valuable community resource and advocate for children and adults with learning differences. "A lifetime sentence" is an understatement for a learning-disabled child.As academic director of Norbel School in Baltimore, I, too, witness the struggles of bright children trying to make sense of this thing we call reading.
NEWS
By Orrin H. Pilkey | February 25, 1998
HASN'T the time come to take a critical look at the erosion problem on Assateague Island and in Ocean City? In the recent storms (and there are more to come this year), Assateague was flattened, and much sand was removed from Ocean City's artificial beaches. Millions of dollars will be spent to pump more sand onto the beach, and more declarations of ultimate victory over the sea will be made by politicians and the Army Corps of Engineers. But the victory is not going to happen.With the global sea level rising, the diminishing supply of sand and frequent storm activity, Maryland's oceanfront beach problems are just beginning.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- What Mother Nature has taken away, Uncle Sam will probably be putting back.The federal government will be asked to bear the estimated $10 million to $30 million cost of replacing dunes and sands that kept Saturday's northeaster from thrashing Ocean City's high-rise waterfront, said an official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.It is "very likely" that top Army officials will approve the plan and repair work could begin as early as April, said Robert W. Lindner, chief of the project development branch with the corps' Baltimore office.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
OCEAN CITY -- Jane Bowen says she has a good guess when the sand pumping on the beaches here will stop."Oh, I'm not saying," said the Catonsville resident who plans to enter a statewide contest to guess the exact time when the pumping will cease. "But [with the previous delays], I don't think it's going to be Friday."Sand pumping from sea to shore in the $12.5 million beach replenishment project is slated to be wrapped up Friday.The project -- designed to restore beaches ravaged by a January northeaster -- was initially expected to be completed by mid-July, but bad weather and other problems caused delays, state officials have said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
ABOARD THE O.C. PRINCESS -- The first question was the easiest to answer at a meeting convened yesterday by Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest to address the clogging of Ocean City's bays and channels."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
As Hurricane Felix stalls along the Atlantic coast and threatens to erode the shore with pounding surf and rain, critics question the value of mid-Atlantic beach replenishment projects that have cost federal taxpayers at least $500 million during the past decade.At issue is whether dumping millions of tons of sand on erosion-prone beaches is a wasteful boon to coastal landowners, or whether shorefront real estate and the tax revenue it generates are worth the effort.Congressional representatives and the Army Corps of Engineers say the projects are well worth the money in states such as Maryland, with its prized Ocean City resort.
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