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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore Sun contributor Sloane Brown was picking up lunch at Whole Foods last week when she found herself singing along to the Beach Boys song playing in the store. "So hoist up the John B's sail, see how the mainsail sets," Brown sang as she bent over the salad bar at the Harbor East store. Then she realized she wasn't the only one singing along to the Beach Boys' 1966 hit "Sloop John B. " A person on the other side of the salad bar was singing too, and he looked very familiar.
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By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
This week 48 years ago, NBC boasted the first entire TV lineup in color, actor Ronald Regan was elected governor of California, John Lennon met Yoko Ono at an art gallery in London and the following songs were the most popular in the United States, according to Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. 10. "I'm Your Puppet," James and Bobby Purify The million-selling "I'm Your Puppet" was the soul duo's biggest hit. By the way, their real names: James Purify and Robert Dickey.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Early on "That's Why God Made the Radio," the new Beach Boys album released earlier this month, comes "Isn't It Time," a breezy pop song bursting at its seams with the group's instantly recognizable vocal harmonies. "The world is changed and yet the game is still the same," sings bandleader Brian Wilson. He could be singing about dancing with his favorite girl, but it's also an apt line for California's most famous surf-rockers' current state. Time has passed, but the Beach Boys' most famous trademarks - layered, larger-than-life singing, and sunny lyrics that longingly nod to fleeting summer love - remain intact.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Baltimore Sun contributor Sloane Brown was picking up lunch at Whole Foods last week when she found herself singing along to a Beach Boys song that was playing in the store. "So hoist up the John B's sail, see how the mainsail sets," sang Brown as she bent over the salad bar. "Let me go home, let me go home. I wanna go home. " Then she realized she wasn't the only one singing along to the Beach Boys' 1966 hit. A person on the other side of the salad bar was singing, too, and he looked very familiar.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
Two weeks from today, the Beach Boys will perform at the National Guard Armory in Havre de Grace to help raise funds for the Susquehanna Hose Co.For 30 years, the Beach Boys have been riding a wave of popularity in the United States, entertaining crowds from coast to coast with their surfing music."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christiana Sciaudone and Christiana Sciaudone,Los Angeles Times | March 28, 2004
Harry Jarnagan loves the Beach Boys, although he's never been to a show, never been in a fan club and never owned all of their albums. The proof of his passion lies in an 80-page application that he hand-delivered in February to the California Office of Historical Preservation to have the site of the Wilson brothers' childhood home declared a historic landmark. The home at 3701 W. 119th St. in Hawthorne, Calif., was leveled in the 1980s to make way for the Century Freeway. The street is quiet except for the hum of the freeway several feet above.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1994
Ocean City--This is the way summer officially ends in Ocean City: Not with a whimper, but a bang (apologies to T. S. Eliot). The Beach Boys, Dion and Starship will put on an end-of-summer concert on the beach Saturday, Sept. 3."I think we're at least going to match last year's number," says Ocean City's tourism director, Bob Rothermel. "Last year it drew 10,000 people. We may even draw more than that."Labor Day weekend is a difficult one to predict, he says, because of the changing date each year (the first Monday in September moves around the calendar)
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 26, 1995
It's no secret that life as a Beach Boy wasn't exactly fun-fun-fun for Brian Wilson.After suffering through a harsh childhood at the hands of an abusive father, he achieved fame and fortune as the musical genius behind the most popular and American band of its time -- only to lose both his artistic drive and emotional balance to drugs and emotional difficulties. Wilson's unhappy story has been so widely reported that even staunch fans have difficulty thinking of him as anything more than a tragic and pathetic figure.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 27, 1993
One of early rock's most vivid and enduring myths is that of Brian Wilson, the California dreamer. It's an image easily summoned by anyone familiar with the Beach Boys' saga: pale, pudgy Brian, sitting alone in his room with a piano and a notebook, wistfully writing odes to the waves he never rode, the hot rods he never drove, and the surfer girls he never knew.It's a powerful image despite the irony implicit in his stay-at-home existence, and a marvelous testament to an artist's ability to conjure a whole world though words and music.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
So how does an accordion-playing boy from Baltimore end up a career keyboardist with legendary sun-and-fun band the Beach Boys?Practice, practice. And a deep appreciation for all kinds of music, from Beethoven to Chick Corea to the Beatles.Baltimore native Mike Meros, 46, was introduced to the Beach Boys when he was a teen-ager. "I remember turning on the radio, and the DJ said, 'The next group is better than the Beatles.' And then I heard 'Good Vibrations' for the first time. And I thought, 'He could be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have held on to their respective jobs longer than anyone in Maryland history, but they haven't done it alone. Both are known for top-notch staffs led by politically savvy, resilient women with a gift for smoothing relations between their strong-willed bosses. The importance of Kristin F. Jones and Victoria L. Gruber to the workings of the General Assembly has long been well-known to Annapolis insiders. Gruber has held her job with Miller for seven years; Jones has been on Busch's team for 11-plus years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
There are at least two remarkable things to note in Colin Blunstone's voice. First, of course, is its sound, that light, airy quality - is it breathy, or breathless? - that gave the great Zombies tracks of the mid-1960s an immediate, intimate, confessional feel. Rod Argent's jazz-inflected keyboard playing is distinctive and pleasing. Blunstone's voice is arresting. Second is the fact that it appears to have aged not at all. Live at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis Monday evening, where Blunstone and Argent led the 2013 version of the Zombies through a crowd-pleasing set of hits, covers and a few new songs, Blunstone sounded precisely as he did on records he made nearly half a century ago. In contrast to his contemporaries - say, Paul McCartney or Mick Jagger , both of whom will be passing through the region in the next month - he still sounds about 22. It was that voice, along with the rock drive of a crack band and a catalog that always stood outside of its time, that made the Zombies' sound, however improbably at this late date, fresh in 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Early on "That's Why God Made the Radio," the new Beach Boys album released earlier this month, comes "Isn't It Time," a breezy pop song bursting at its seams with the group's instantly recognizable vocal harmonies. "The world is changed and yet the game is still the same," sings bandleader Brian Wilson. He could be singing about dancing with his favorite girl, but it's also an apt line for California's most famous surf-rockers' current state. Time has passed, but the Beach Boys' most famous trademarks - layered, larger-than-life singing, and sunny lyrics that longingly nod to fleeting summer love - remain intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The first time he was asked to consider working on a musical about the 1960s pop/rock sensation Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Marshall Brickman declined. "I still wake up screaming sometimes, thinking how my life would have been different had I stuck with saying no," he said by phone from his New York home. That initial reluctance could have derailed the project that turned into "Jersey Boys," the multiple Tony Award-winning, international monster hit that landed this week at the Hippodrome . The Bronx-born Brickman, former head writer of "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson" and co-screenwriter of such Woody Allen classics as "Annie Hall," had a good excuse when actor/writer/creative consultant Rick Elice suggested a Four Seasons show.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Every day for three years, when Darlene Love stepped onto a Broadway stage to sing, she was transported to Baltimore — to the city of big hair and 1960s dance music — playing a teenager who gives dance lessons to a girl longing to be on the Corny Collins Show. Tomorrow, her role in "Hairspray" long behind her, she comes to the city of Hon to host a live Maryland Public Television premiere of her new DVD, "Darlene Love: The Concert of Love. " For those who may not have grown up singing along on the radio to "He's sure the boy I am going to marry" or "Da Doo Ron Ron," Love was a voice behind many 1960s hits.
FEATURES
By Charles Passy and Charles Passy,COX NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2003
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Before you get far into a conversation with Mike Love, the much-maligned founding member of the Beach Boys, he wants to make one thing perfectly clear. He's not Brian Wilson. Wilson, not Love, is the singer, songwriter and production genius who's credited with being the "soul" of the surf-loving Southern California group, which transformed itself into an art-rock ensemble on the heralded Pet Sounds album. But Love, the Wilson cousin who sang that unmistakable nasally lead and contributed lyrics to such timeless songs as "Surfin' Safari," "Fun, Fun, Fun," "California Girls" and "Good Vibrations," wasn't exactly hiding in the background.
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