Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBco
IN THE NEWS

Bco

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Percussionists can trace their musical ancestors back several hundred thousand years (less, I guess, for evolution-resistant types). The practice of getting sounds and establishing rhythms by striking various objects suggests a deep, natural impulse; the practice of putting those sounds and rhythms into an artistic context requires a degree of imagination that doesn't necessarily come so easily. For its latest concert, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra focused on clever, colorful examples of employing percussion, from very subtle to hit-on-the-head obviousness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Baltimore has experienced a bounty of Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, among others, in recent days. My favorite experience came Sunday evening when Shriver Hall Concert Series presented the Scharoun Ensemble Berlin, a chamber group comprising (mostly) of members of the famed Berlin Philharmonic. It's always uplifting to be in the presence of musicians who are at the top of their game. Brahms' Clarinet Quintet, a piece infused with twilight, received a performance of commendable sensitivity, where the spaces between phrases emerged as meaningfully as any of the notes.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2008
A couple of seasons ago, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra faced financial pressures and an uncertain future. As the organization approaches tomorrow's 25th anniversary season finale, things are looking a lot better for the 26th. "We pulled out of an ugly situation," says music director Markand Thakar. "Our financial health is OK, and the attitude at the BCO is positive." Next season, the orchestra, which has an operating budget of $365,000, will make its New York debut, performing as part of the popular Bargemusic series presented on a "floating concert hall" moored beneath the Brooklyn Bridge.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | December 22, 2009
Most of Baltimore's classical music ensembles will take a break during the holidays, but one of them is going full-throttle - half a world away. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, about 40 members strong, heads to China on Saturday for a five-concert gig in Suzhou, a city of 5.9 million in the Yangtze River Delta. The trip is all the more remarkable, given the BCO's recent troubles. "Eleven months ago, things were dicey," says music director Markand Thakar. Back then, adds executive director Lockwood Hoehl, "We were waiting to see if the board was going to close up shop."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
In an effort to avoid debt and to shore up its finances, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra has canceled its last two concerts of the season and asked its musicians to donate their services for a Jan. 25 concert. The canceled concerts, of the orchestra's 26th season, were scheduled in February and May. "We need to be build up our coffers again," Jeffrey Penza, BCO board president, said yesterday. "Our hope is that we will be able to come back next season in a much stronger position." Like other arts organizations, notably the Baltimore Opera Company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last month, the BCO experienced a decline in ticket sales and contributions when the national economy began its decline.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 15, 2002
Anne Harrigan, founding music director of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, will step down from the podium in 2004. She will conduct the ensemble's 20th anniversary season (2002-2003) as scheduled, and continue as music director the following season, when candidates for the job will guest-conduct most of the concerts. "I've been thinking about doing this for a couple of years," Harrigan said from her home in Grand Rapids, Mich. "My daughter is going into kindergarten in the fall, and I decided it's time to devote more time and energy to my family.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 12, 2004
Markand Thakar, one of four finalists and more than 175 applicants, has been named music director and conductor of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra. Thakar, co-director of the graduate conducting program at the Peabody Institute, succeeds the BCO's founding music director Anne Harrigan, whose 21-year tenure ends this month. "It's a blast," Thakar says of the appointment. "I think the BCO is a fabulous organization that has tremendous potential." Jeffrey Penza, chairman of the BCO's search and selection committee, said it was "a very difficult decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 24, 2002
There's nothing like Hungarian music to get the blood flowing. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, joined for part of the program by some of Maryland's top young musicians, will be reveling in gypsy airs and dances this week. Music by two of Hungary's finest composers, Zoltan Kodaly (the spirited Dances of Galanta) and Ernest von Dohnanyi (Serenade), will be featured. And, of course, there will be selections from Johannes Brahms' Hungarian Dances. It is here that the BCO will have company onstage.
NEWS
July 24, 2002
The student: Jay Brimley, 17 School: River Hill High Special achievement: Played violin with professional musicians at the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's (BCO) Side-by-Side concert. Top high school players from the Maryland All-State Orchestra were selected to rehearse and perform with the BCO in February. What he learned from the BCO musicians: "Musical maturity. Instead of playing the music just to get the notes right, it's playing the music because you like it and because you want to get better."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | December 22, 2009
Most of Baltimore's classical music ensembles will take a break during the holidays, but one of them is going full-throttle - half a world away. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, about 40 members strong, heads to China on Saturday for a five-concert gig in Suzhou, a city of 5.9 million in the Yangtze River Delta. The trip is all the more remarkable, given the BCO's recent troubles. "Eleven months ago, things were dicey," says music director Markand Thakar. Back then, adds executive director Lockwood Hoehl, "We were waiting to see if the board was going to close up shop."
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
In an effort to avoid debt and to shore up its finances, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra has canceled its last two concerts of the season and asked its musicians to donate their services for a Jan. 25 concert. The canceled concerts, of the orchestra's 26th season, were scheduled in February and May. "We need to be build up our coffers again," Jeffrey Penza, BCO board president, said yesterday. "Our hope is that we will be able to come back next season in a much stronger position." Like other arts organizations, notably the Baltimore Opera Company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last month, the BCO experienced a decline in ticket sales and contributions when the national economy began its decline.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2008
A couple of seasons ago, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra faced financial pressures and an uncertain future. As the organization approaches tomorrow's 25th anniversary season finale, things are looking a lot better for the 26th. "We pulled out of an ugly situation," says music director Markand Thakar. "Our financial health is OK, and the attitude at the BCO is positive." Next season, the orchestra, which has an operating budget of $365,000, will make its New York debut, performing as part of the popular Bargemusic series presented on a "floating concert hall" moored beneath the Brooklyn Bridge.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 15, 2008
To commemorate in music the human toll of war, any war, is a daunting prospect, involving weighty questions of text and tone, scope and scale. Benjamin Britten's attempt is the best known. He took the massive approach in 1961 with his War Requiem for soloists, multiple choruses and orchestra. It's steeped in references to the 20th century's two world conflicts, but timeless and place-less in its relevance, unmistakable in its anti-war mood. Jonathan Leshnoff followed a much more compact path in creating his Requiem for the Fallen, premiered Wednesday night by the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra and Handel Choir of Baltimore in a welcome collaboration at Goucher College's Kraushaar College (just one performance, unfortunately)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 18, 2007
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra opened its 25th anniversary season Tuesday night with the kind of imaginative programming that music director Markand Thakar has made a specialty. In between familiar Beethoven pieces were two rarities by African-born composers and a movie theme by John Williams - a neat balancing act. Thakar's choices for this concert and the rest of the season were inspired by the ensemble's milestone. He looked back at 1984, when conductor Anne Harrigan and her intrepid colleagues launched the BCO, and took note of what was going on in the world.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2005
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra closed its season with a night of dealer's choice. The program on Wednesday at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium offered standard Mozart, Mendelssohn and Stravinsky works that were all selected by a committee of orchestra members. The players also chose the soloist - from within their own ranks. The ensemble did not put its best foot forward at the start. Stravinsky's intricate neoclassical gem, Dumbarton Oaks, sounded underrehearsed, underpowered and underappreciated.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 11, 2005
Percussionists can trace their musical ancestors back several hundred thousand years (less, I guess, for evolution-resistant types). The practice of getting sounds and establishing rhythms by striking various objects suggests a deep, natural impulse; the practice of putting those sounds and rhythms into an artistic context requires a degree of imagination that doesn't necessarily come so easily. For its latest concert, the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra focused on clever, colorful examples of employing percussion, from very subtle to hit-on-the-head obviousness.
FEATURES
By Kenneth Meltzer and Kenneth Meltzer,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1994
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra presented its third concert of the 1993-1994 season last night at Kraushaar Auditorium under the direction of guest conductor David Itkin.Mr. Itkin, music director of the Arkansas and Kingsport Symphony Orchestras, is a musician of not inconsiderable virtues. He possesses an outstanding ear for orchestral texture, and his sense of pace is unerring. His podium manner is admirable for its restraint and clarity of gesture.Consequently the evening's opening work, Mendelssohn's "Hebrides" or "Fingal's Cave" Overture, was impeccably delivered by the BCO, a first-class ensemble.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 9, 1995
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's concert last night in Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium was a near-perfect model of inventive programming. Music director Anne Harrigan blended a most attractive mix: a 20th-century classic; a work that is threatening to become a staple of the contemporary repertoire; an almost unknown concerto; and one of the most beloved of Mozart's symphonies.The little-known work was Launy Grondahl's Concerto for Trombone. The name of the composer rings a bell among old record collectors.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 1, 2004
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra got something more than a talented conductor when it selected a successor to founding music director Anne Harrigan in June. Markand Thakar, mild-mannered professor for a great metropolitan conservatory and soft-spoken music director of a modest-sized orchestra in northeastern Minnesota, may turn out to be a classical music hero. All right, hero is too strong a word, but, these days, anyone who can point to the sort of trend-bucking success that Thakar has generated seems more powerful than a speeding finale by Beethoven.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 2004
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, a significant player in the local music scene for more than 20 years, started a new chapter Wednesday night with Markand Thakar's first appearance as music director. He's only the second person to occupy the podium of this ensemble, founded and conducted by Anne Harrigan, and comes with solid credentials. He's co-director of the graduate conducting program at the Peabody Conservatory and music director of the Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra. There's nothing like an all-Beethoven program to test any conductor's mettle.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.