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By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,Los Angeles Times | July 10, 2007
NEW YORK -- When it comes to reach, few news organizations rival that of the BBC, the venerable British broadcasting service recognized for its no-nonsense newscasts delivered in crisp, clipped tones. BBC World, the BBC's commercially funded 24-hour television news channel, attracts 76 million viewers a week from more than 200 countries, making it one of the biggest international news networks. But 16 years after its launch, the channel is largely absent from one major market: the United States.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
How much do you know about the week's new events? Or the geography of the Middle East? Or Batman movies? Coleman Anderson and his partner, Andrew Schuster, are betting a few hundred thousand of their investors' dollars that whatever you know, you'll want to test yourself, and that you're willing to spend time in the pursuit on their new website: Newsup. "The goal really is to make news a more meaningful experience for folks," especially young people, said Anderson, the chief marketing officer, who is 29. The site — http://www.newsup.me — presents news about national and world events, entertainment and sports in the form of an array of brief quizzes on a particular topic.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 10, 2007
JERUSALEM -- An obscure Palestinian group claimed in a tape released yesterday that it was holding BBC correspondent Alan Johnston and demanded as a condition of his release that the British government free a jailed Muslim cleric. The statement, if confirmed, would be the first public demand made by kidnappers since Johnston was seized at gunpoint in Gaza City two months ago. The BBC said the tape shows a picture of his identification card, a possible sign that the claim is true, but not one of Johnston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The heart of Al Jazeera America's prime-time lineup is an attractive one if you are looking for news, context and a fresh visual perspective on U.S. and world events. At least that's the way it looked premiere night Tuesday as the Qatar-based channel unveiled a solidly-reported and skillfully packaged hour of news at 8 p.m. followed by “America Tonight,” its flagship broadcast of in-depth, magazine-style pieces. And yet, even as this promising addition to the American TV news landscape arrived, AT&T announced Tuesday that it would not carry the channel on its U-verse pay-TV service with an estimated 5 million viewers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 18, 2003
With the White House and Pentagon facing mounting criticism over their handling of the war in Iraq, what's one more television report attacking their credibility? Perhaps not all that much when measured against the sheer mass of media questions as to whether there really were stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq or efforts by Saddam Hussein's regime to obtain uranium. But War Spin: Jessica Lynch, a British report airing tonight on BBC America, does take allegations that the U.S. government purposefully misled the public to a new level that warrants consideration.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 2, 2007
JERUSALEM -- A videotape of journalist Alan Johnston surfaced yesterday, the first signs of the BBC reporter who was abducted in the Gaza Strip 2 1/2 months ago. In the tape, posted on a militant Islamic Web site, Johnston says he is being treated well, laments the "huge" and "unacceptable" suffering of the Palestinian people and condemns the U.S. and British invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan. Although Johnston appears to be speaking extemporaneously, it was not possible to know under what conditions the videotape was made.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | October 28, 1993
LONDON -- The British have been explaining America ever since Capt. John Smith first sailed into the Chesapeake Bay and stepped ashore to examine the vast, unknown and recalcitrant continent before him.Almost four centuries later, the United States remains a preoccupation of the guys who once owned the store but now find themselves running a branch office after the big takeover.This fall, the British Broadcasting Corp.'s World Service is trying its hand at figuring out America with more than 100 programs on "The State of the States."
FEATURES
By Meg James and Meg James,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2003
HOLLYWOOD -- Could it be another British invasion? The British Broadcasting Corp. has long been an idea factory for American TV producers, dating back to that United Kingdom export Til Death Do Us Part, recast for U.S. audiences as All In the Family. But the BBC has been particularly busy in recent months, scripting itself as a bigger player in Hollywood, hoping to wring more money from its concepts and programs. BBC Worldwide Limited, the commercial arm of the venerable network, sold CBS an idea for an unscripted show called Sack Race, in which a contestant spends a day at work trying to get fired.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Discovery Communications Inc. will invest $500 million or more in a long-term partnership with the British Broadcasting Corp. to develop programming and new cable TV channels in the U.S. and abroad, the Bethesda company said yesterday.The deal is expected to lead to a BBC cable channel in the United States that would be owned by the British government-controlled broadcaster, yet distributed through Discovery's relationships with local cable systems.It also will give Discovery the right of first refusal to show nearly all of the BBC's nonfiction programming in the U.S., and the right to work with the BBC to develop programs for Discovery's present and future cable channels, including the Discovery Channel, the Learning Channel, and the Animal Planet Channel.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
British Broadcasting Corp. looks as though it could best Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labor government in the nasty, public fight that has dominated headlines in London this summer. But the U.K.'s most eminent media organization - one of the world's most recognized names in journalism - still has much to lose. The background: In late May, BBC correspondent Andrew Gilligan reported that a senior government analyst alleged Blair's dossier arguing in favor of war against Iraq had been "sexed up" by the prime minister's public relations chief.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
It's not often that a sequel is better than the original, especially when the original is as dazzling as BBC America's miniseries "The Hour" was last year. But that's the case with the intoxicating mix of lust, longing, superb acting and a little bit of 1950s Brit journalism that debuts Wednesday night at 9 on BBC America. And at the very heart of all the sizzle in this six-part series set at a BBC newsmagazine called "The Hour" is Dominic West, best known in these parts as Detective Jimmy McNulty of HBO's "The Wire.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
The first season of "Chef Race: U.S. vs. U.K.," a chef competition show on BBC America, is drawing to a close. There are only two episodes left. During Tuesday night's episode, which begins at 10 p.m., the contestants will be making a stop in Baltimore. Here's the episode description from the "Chef Race" website : "It's the penultimate leg of the race with only four chefs (2 Brits and 2 Americans) remaining. Starting in Bedford, Penn., with nothing but a sack of potatoes each, the teams are charged with 'trading up' to acquire other ingredients for a cook-off at a trendy Baltimore restaurant.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
For Jimmy Cornell, it was all about freedom. Early in his adult life, it came from fleeing communist Romania and finding his way to England, where he worked as a radio correspondent for the BBC. After he got married and began to help his wife, Gwenda, raise their two small children, it came in finding his way to the sea. It took until his early 30s to get there. "I was, to be honest, a hippy and I did not want a career in the BBC. I did not want to become a rich man when I was 50, I didn't care about this," Cornell recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Barry Levinson and Tom Fontana, the executive producers of "Homicide: Life on the Street," return to prime time tonight on BBC America with "Copper," starring Tom Weston-Jones. (That's Weston-Jones sitting with them in the picture above, taken in California where they were promoting the series.) Set in 1864 in New York, the series is cop drama meets frontier saga, and I like it. I loved "Homicide," "Oz" and Levinson's last TV effort, "You Don't Know Jack," a docu-drama look at Dr. Jack Kevorkian, starring Al Pacino, for HBO. But I hated "The Jury," a series the duo did for Fox. They've had some failed projects since "Homicide" and "Oz," but I think "Copper" could be a winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
If you want to see the finest new drama of the TV year, tune in BBC America at 10 p.m. Wednesday for the opener of "The Hour," a six-week series starring Dominic West, of "The Wire,"and Romola Garai, of "Emma. " He plays a hard-to-read establishment anchorman at a BBC newsmagazine; she plays his producer boss. He's married; she isn't. That doesn't stop stuff from happening between them -- powerful stuff. I guarantee you nothing the networks will offer in coming months of their fall seasons comes close to "The Hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
With Felicia "Snoop" Pearson's guilty plea last week to conspiracy to sell heroin, one question being asked by fans of "The Wire" is how other cast members of the Baltimore-based series are doing. The answer: Several are doing just fine professionally. And a few are doing extraordinary work on and off camera. Some of it can be seen this week on TV. Two of the finest actors from the HBO series, Dominic West and Idris Elba, are about to help launch a prestigious drama showcase and series on BBC America at 10 Wednesday night.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 6, 1994
Everybody knows about the Beatles playing "The Ed Sullivan Show." Indeed, seeing the Fab Four on the Sullivan show was a seminal experience for countless American fans, most of whom had no other hope of catching the band in concert.Back home in Britain, however, it was much easier to have a sense of what the Beatles sounded like live. It wasn't just that the group did more touring there than here; it also taped no less than 52 programs for BBC radio between March 1962 and June 1965. Unfortunately, although the BBC taped each of the performances, the only fans with access to the recordings were those who invested heavily in bootlegs.
NEWS
By Janet Stobart and Janet Stobart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2003
LONDON - British Prime Minister Tony Blair will be called to testify on the death of Dr. David Kelly, the United Nations weapons inspector, the chief investigator said yesterday. Kelly, a microbiologist, had been named in media and government circles as the source for British Broadcasting Corp. reports, accusing the government of "sexing up" or exaggerating the dossier on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction. The files were part of the material presented by the Blair government to build support for going to war against Iraq.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | May 20, 2009
When visitors come, you want to show off the good stuff. Crabs on the Fells Point waterfront. Sailing the Inner Harbor. Walks around Fort McHenry. The dolphin show at the aquarium. An afternoon Orioles game. Recently, I had guests who wanted to see the other Baltimore, the one with the bodies and the bloodshed, the one with the boarded rowhouses and empty neighborhoods, the one TV news and TV entertainment have blurred into one macabre pageant of urban ills, dysfunction and misfortune.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
Three of fall's most anticipated new series premiere tonight, and taken together, they offer a near-perfect snapshot of the state of network TV today - for better or worse. There are talented stars and bits of strong writing in each of the two dramas and one sitcom, but there is little originality or inspiration. Two are knockoffs of BBC and Australian TV series, and the other is a Jerry Bruckheimer assembly-line procedural (Think: Without a Trace). They are, however, about as good as network TV is going to get in this era of decline, and each has its moments, small as they may be. ABC's "Life On Mars" Who could not find something to like in a cop drama that features Harvey Keitel and Michael Imperioli?
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