Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBazooka
IN THE NEWS

Bazooka

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Edward G. Uhl, former president of Fairchild Industries who was co-inventor of the M-1 bazooka during World War II, died Sunday of heart failure at William Hill Gardens, an Easton assisted-living facility. The Oxford resident was 92. Born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J., the son of a mechanic and a homemaker, Mr. Uhl was a 1936 graduate of Jefferson High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering physics in 1940 from Lehigh University, where he had been a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 13, 2013
Now that Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman has declared the possession of stun guns to be "clearly protected by the Second Amendment" (in an interview with WBAL Radio), we must consider other weapons that should be protected constitutionally. Grenades, improvised explosive devices, hand-held missiles, and, of course, tactical nuclear devices are surely protected as "arms" by the Second Amendment because we need the ability to protect ourselves from an oppressive government which already has all of these resources.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | September 4, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- If you're a sentimentalist, chew on this: Baseball cards aren't going to be bubble-gum cards anymore.A spokesman for Topps, which has been selling cards packaged with gum since 1952, confirmed yesterday that the company has decided to remove the gum from its sports card products."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Edward G. Uhl, former president of Fairchild Industries who was co-inventor of the M-1 bazooka during World War II, died Sunday of heart failure at William Hill Gardens, an Easton assisted-living facility. The Oxford resident was 92. Born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J., the son of a mechanic and a homemaker, Mr. Uhl was a 1936 graduate of Jefferson High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering physics in 1940 from Lehigh University, where he had been a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | November 29, 1992
As Aberdeen Proving Ground observes its diamond anniversary this year, the brilliant facets of its military history have been well polished for public display.And none is prouder of the base's accomplishments than Leonard C. Weston, who retired last year after 24 years as historian for APG -- the proving ground side, not the adjoining Edgewood chemical research land that was administratively absorbed in 1971, he emphasizes.Carved from some of Harford's richest agricultural land and prime hunting marshes, APG proved to be a reliable, growing source of income for the county.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
Now that Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman has declared the possession of stun guns to be "clearly protected by the Second Amendment" (in an interview with WBAL Radio), we must consider other weapons that should be protected constitutionally. Grenades, improvised explosive devices, hand-held missiles, and, of course, tactical nuclear devices are surely protected as "arms" by the Second Amendment because we need the ability to protect ourselves from an oppressive government which already has all of these resources.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | September 29, 1994
A loaded military weapon designed to destroy armored tanks was found in the Pleasant Valley area early yesterday, removed by authorities and destroyed.State police investigators said an employee of the 7-Eleven store at Route 140 and Center Street in Westminster got a telephone call about 2:30 a.m. from a man who said "a weapon" was next to a utility pole on Indian Valley Road, then hung up. The store employee called state police.Troopers from the Westminster barracks found the shoulder-fired weapon next to a utility pole near Indian Valley and Pleasant Valley roads.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 28, 1990
Saddam Hussein does not seem to understand American media. I watched his 76-minute videotape address the other night and it was so boring, I thought I was watching The Learning Channel.There were no cute girls, no singing policemen, no hidden cameras catching people doing stupid things. He just sat there between a flag and a potted plant, looking like the guy who killed Laura Palmer.What Saddam Hussein needs is to have his image reshaped. He needs to hire some of the media wizards who work in American presidential campaigns.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | December 4, 1990
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- A California woman is savoring the sweet smell of success after getting the first trademark for a scent -- a landmark ruling that may have makers of everything from Bazooka bubble gum to Old Spice after-shave scrambling to lock up their lucrative aromas."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Calling "campus violence a reality" to prepare for, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore announced plans Thursday to spend $60,000 on the Clark Kent of teacher supplies: an innocuous-looking white board that can stop bullets. The high-tech tablet - which hangs on a hook, measures 18 by 20 inches and comes in pink, blue and green - can be used as a personal shield for professors under attack, according to the company that makes it, and a portable writing pad in quieter times. "It needs to be a great whiteboard and a useful tool so that it doesn't get hidden in the closet," said maker George Tunis.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | September 29, 1994
A loaded military weapon designed to destroy armored tanks was found in the Pleasant Valley area early yesterday, removed by authorities and destroyed.State police investigators said an employee of the 7-Eleven store at Route 140 and Center Street in Westminster got a telephone call about 2:30 a.m. from a man who said "a weapon" was next to a utility pole on Indian Valley Road, then hung up. The store employee called state police.Troopers from the Westminster barracks found the shoulder-fired weapon next to a utility pole near Indian Valley and Pleasant Valley roads.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | November 29, 1992
As Aberdeen Proving Ground observes its diamond anniversary this year, the brilliant facets of its military history have been well polished for public display.And none is prouder of the base's accomplishments than Leonard C. Weston, who retired last year after 24 years as historian for APG -- the proving ground side, not the adjoining Edgewood chemical research land that was administratively absorbed in 1971, he emphasizes.Carved from some of Harford's richest agricultural land and prime hunting marshes, APG proved to be a reliable, growing source of income for the county.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | September 4, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- If you're a sentimentalist, chew on this: Baseball cards aren't going to be bubble-gum cards anymore.A spokesman for Topps, which has been selling cards packaged with gum since 1952, confirmed yesterday that the company has decided to remove the gum from its sports card products."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 28, 1990
Saddam Hussein does not seem to understand American media. I watched his 76-minute videotape address the other night and it was so boring, I thought I was watching The Learning Channel.There were no cute girls, no singing policemen, no hidden cameras catching people doing stupid things. He just sat there between a flag and a potted plant, looking like the guy who killed Laura Palmer.What Saddam Hussein needs is to have his image reshaped. He needs to hire some of the media wizards who work in American presidential campaigns.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Next month, Topps goes retro with gum in card packs that sell for 50 cents.Topps put gum with its cards until 1992, but there were two problems. The gum stained the cards, and it wasn't Bazooka. It was a flat sheet of something comparatively tasteless that shattered if dropped.Those won't be problems next month, when Topps Bazooka Major League Baseball Bubble Gum Cards (will all these words fit on a pack?) reach store shelves."Those who used to complain that the gum left a residue won't have to worry," says Topps' Marty Appel.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.