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By David Birchman | March 18, 1998
Deep dark down - I mean,deep deep dark down in the bayou -where the bones of the band in a jumble lie,there rests the blues in a pool of oozewith the ghosts of the bygone-bye.Long ago when it was wondrous warmand steamy swamps spread all across this land,you could feel the heat off Basin Streetfrom Billy Bronto's Band.Man, the place was a kitchen!And that kitchen was hot cause the band was cookin'!There was Rex the King Tyrone on the slide tromboneand Brother Billy on the bass.There was a mean allosaurus saxophonistnicknamed Lizard Lips Grace.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 4, 2012
Not sweltering enough in Maryland? Gov. Martin O'Malley flew south this weekend to Louisiana where he is giving the keynote address at the state party's annual fundraising dinner. It's the latest in a string of Democratic money events for O'Malley, who has tended to his national profile this summer while also reaching out to lawmakers to push a gambling expansion legislation for next week's special session. O'Malley, who chairs the Democratic Governors Association, has made trips to Virginia, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maine and Wisconsin this year.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
Lou Ward used his CIA training to launch a successful career. No, not the CIA based in Langley, Va., but the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. That was 32 years ago, and today he owns one of the oldest restaurants in Havre de Grace -- the Bayou (pronounced BAY-u). The 54-year-old Havre de Grace native purchased the Bayou in 1982 from Al and Jewell DiDomenico. "Al and Jewell established the Bayou as a sandwich shop in 1949," Ward said. "During their ownership, the restaurant continued to change.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 4, 2008
NEW YORK - Samuel Israel III, the hedge fund manager who fled after faking a suicide last month, went to prison yesterday, 25 days late. The federal judge who originally sentenced Israel ordered him to immediately begin serving his 20-year sentence. At a hearing in Federal District Court in Manhattan, Judge Colleen McMahon denied Israel bail and was unsympathetic to his claim that he tried to commit suicide two days ago. Israel, who surrendered to the police Wednesday, faces additional charges of bail-jumping and up to 10 years in prison, on top of the 20-year sentence he received in April for swindling $450 million from investors in the Bayou Group, the hedge fund that he co-founded.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
Copeland's, a New Orleans-based chain restaurant that opened recently in Annapolis, boasts that it serves "the ultimate New Orleans experience." That isn't too far from the truth.My mother and father are from Baton Rouge, La., so I'm familiar with the state's cuisine, and Copeland's does New Orleans and the Bayou State justice.From the outside, the two-story building looks more like the Taj Mahal than a restaurant. Inside, it's equally ornate with vaulted ceilings, fan-shaped relief motifs on the walls, and cherry-wood paneling around the dining area.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | February 8, 1992
THE BAYOU 927 Pulaski Highway, Havre de Grace. Open daily 11:30 a.m. to 8 Call (410) 939-3565.Everything you need to feed last-minute guests or a hungry, busy family is waiting for you at the Bayou. Patrons can choose from the regular menu or order the economical "family of four special."The special costs $15.95 and provides a meal for four people, including entree, vegetables, potatoes and dessert. Customers can select one item from each of six categories. Entrees, for example, include roast beef, baked ham, fried chicken, roast turkey and spaghetti.
SPORTS
By Nick Cafardo and Nick Cafardo,Boston Globe | January 21, 1991
BOSTON -- Roger Clemens had what his agent described as a "quiet day" yesterday in his Katy, Texas, home after a troublesome string of events Saturday led to his arrest on charges of aggravated assault on a police officer."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 23, 1993
MOBILE, Ala. -- Federal officials suspect that a barge knocked into a bridge here and caused an Amtrak train to tumble into a murky bayou yesterday, killing more than 40 passengers in one of the worst U.S. rail calamities of the century.As the train, carrying 206 people, crossed the bridge, the center section gave way, sending slumbering passengers hurtling into the swamp."It looked like a version of Dante's 'Inferno,' with the heads bobbing around in the dark and the flames," said Julie Dicks of Lake City, Fla., whose son pulled her from the train.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine Blues B.B. King | November 12, 1998
The Rugrats MovieMusic From the Motion Picture (Interscope 90181)There's a reason "Rugrats" is one of the most popular shows on cable. Not only is its writing and animation sharp enough to hold the attention of adult viewers, but its characters are drawn without the condescension that often colors kidvid.In short, it's an equal-opportunity entertainer, one that doesn't discriminate on the basis of age or sophistication. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that "The Rugrats Movie: Music from the Motion Picture" is equally eclectic in its approach.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Sun reporter | May 16, 1993
Prairie Bayou escaped a near brush with disaster yesterday and won the first Preakness Stakes in modern times in which a horse suffered a fatal injury. The death of Union City, who had to be humanely destroyed after fracturing sesamoid bones in his right front ankle, shrouded the achievement of Loblolly Stable, which seems jinxed in the Kentucky Derby , but won the Preakness for the second time in two years. The race also marked the defeat of Kentucky Derby winner Sea Hero, who finished fifth and squelched any chance of a 1993 Triple Crown winner.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
THE REMARKABLE thing about ivory-billed woodpeckers is that for 60 years we couldn't find them, but they could always find them. Deep in the forest primeval, in a secluded Arkansas Shangri-La, birds that were supposed to be extinct went about their birds-and-bees business and kept the species going. Bird-watchers yearned to spot them, ornithologists convinced themselves they were there, careers were ruined by tantalizing ghost-sightings or maybe-sightings or wishful-sightings or within-reasonable-doubt sightings; humans would be struck by an unnatural fever for ivory bills, while the birds themselves sought each other out and kept on with their sasquatchian lives.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2004
Lou Ward used his CIA training to launch a successful career. No, not the CIA based in Langley, Va., but the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. That was 32 years ago, and today he owns one of the oldest restaurants in Havre de Grace -- the Bayou (pronounced BAY-u). The 54-year-old Havre de Grace native purchased the Bayou in 1982 from Al and Jewell DiDomenico. "Al and Jewell established the Bayou as a sandwich shop in 1949," Ward said. "During their ownership, the restaurant continued to change.
NEWS
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2003
Most people who recognize the name Bradley Bayou probably know him for his daytime TV persona: He's a regular guest on the estrogen-fueled kaffeeklatsch known as The View on ABC. On Lifetime, he rescues the aesthetically challenged in a show called Operation Style. But he is also a fashion designer, and recently he was named creative director for the American fashion house Halston, which might be just the thing the long-suffering brand needs. Then again, it might be yet another futile attempt to rescue Halston from licensing obscurity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
Oyster, by John Biguenet. Ecco-Harper Collins. 291 pages. $23.95. Despite the opinions of some New York book critics, we have surely not had too many novels set in Louisiana's bayou country. The region remains obscure, transcendental and tragic. In his first novel, Oyster, set south of New Orleans in the 1950s, John Biguenet (who published a rapturously received collection of short stories a few years back) fixes the swamplands in the literary marketplace with the kind of self-assured economy that only comes from invisible hard work.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
The Cordish Co. was recognized by the Urban Land Institute yesterday for its conversion of a former convention center in Houston into a downtown retail and entertainment center.The ULI presentation to the Baltimore-based development firm for its Bayou Place project marks the first time in the 20-year history of the awards that a real estate company has won four of the prestigious awards."The unqualified success of Bayou Place is a model for the rehabilitation of a `white elephant,' " wrote ULI, a 63-year-old nonprofit education and research institute that studies land use and real estate development policy.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1999
Copeland's, a New Orleans-based chain restaurant that opened recently in Annapolis, boasts that it serves "the ultimate New Orleans experience." That isn't too far from the truth.My mother and father are from Baton Rouge, La., so I'm familiar with the state's cuisine, and Copeland's does New Orleans and the Bayou State justice.From the outside, the two-story building looks more like the Taj Mahal than a restaurant. Inside, it's equally ornate with vaulted ceilings, fan-shaped relief motifs on the walls, and cherry-wood paneling around the dining area.
FEATURES
By Julie Hinds and Julie Hinds,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1997
Like the surprise hit "Soul Food," "Eve's Bayou" dishes up the inner workings of a middle-class African-American family, the sort of rich fare that usually is not on Hollywood's menu.First-time director Kasi Lemmons has cooked up a gumbo of simmering lust, sexual confusion and sibling rivalry, with a pinch of voodoo thrown in."The summer I killed my father, I was 10 years old," says the film's narrator, Eve Batiste, who takes us back to her childhood in the early '60s, when her prosperous family lived in moss-draped splendor in a sleepy backwater.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
THE REMARKABLE thing about ivory-billed woodpeckers is that for 60 years we couldn't find them, but they could always find them. Deep in the forest primeval, in a secluded Arkansas Shangri-La, birds that were supposed to be extinct went about their birds-and-bees business and kept the species going. Bird-watchers yearned to spot them, ornithologists convinced themselves they were there, careers were ruined by tantalizing ghost-sightings or maybe-sightings or wishful-sightings or within-reasonable-doubt sightings; humans would be struck by an unnatural fever for ivory bills, while the birds themselves sought each other out and kept on with their sasquatchian lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine Blues B.B. King | November 12, 1998
The Rugrats MovieMusic From the Motion Picture (Interscope 90181)There's a reason "Rugrats" is one of the most popular shows on cable. Not only is its writing and animation sharp enough to hold the attention of adult viewers, but its characters are drawn without the condescension that often colors kidvid.In short, it's an equal-opportunity entertainer, one that doesn't discriminate on the basis of age or sophistication. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that "The Rugrats Movie: Music from the Motion Picture" is equally eclectic in its approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 1998
Bayou Blues is the real deal, and that's not just my opinion. I asked two friends who had just returned from an eating tour of New Orleans to help me assess the authenticity of the Cajun dishes at this new White Marsh restaurant. The result: Three thumbs up.But food is not the only draw at Bayou Blues. There's live jazz and blues every night of the week until 2 a.m. Since the headliners start at 9 p.m., our advice is to skip the forgettable desserts, and finish your meal with a drink in the lounge where the musicians perform.
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