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Bayard Rustin

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By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1997
"Bayard Rustin," by Jervis Anderson. HarperCollins. 400 pages. $28.This gracefully crafted biography chronicles the life of one the more remarkable figures of the century. Many were more visible, but none exerted a greater nor more beneficial impact on racial progress in our time than Bayard Rustin.Most people who can even remember Rustin probably would identify him as the modest, self-effacing ascetic who organized the March on Washington that provided the platform for Martin Luther King's incomparable "I have a dream" speech.
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NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 27, 2013
In the spring of 1963, when I was a student at the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General Corps School in Charlottesville, Va., the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to town to speak to the student body of the University of Virginia. At the time, my brother, Henry Floyd Johnson, was studying at UVA while also serving as the pastor of a church in Charlottesville. He had known King for some time, and took me to meet him on the evening that he was scheduled to speak. King greeted me warmly, and we chatted for about 15 minutes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Wicker and Tom Wicker,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 2003
Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin, by John D'Emilio (Free Press, 568 pages, $35), is one of the saddest stories you will ever read. Rustin was a charismatic leader, a lifelong pacifist, an imprisoned conscientious objector during World War II, a leading American teacher of Gandhian nonviolence, perhaps the prime mentor to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and the major planner and organizer of black America's triumphal March on Washington in...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 8, 2006
In all the furor the past week about "racism at Johns Hopkins University" -- as the headline in the Nov. 4-Nov. 10 Afro American puts it -- aren't people forgetting something? One of those somethings is the Hopkins Baltimore Scholars program. Students in Baltimore public schools -- which have an overwhelmingly black population -- who are accepted at Hopkins pay no tuition. It's a sure way to increase the number of black students on the Hopkins campus. The program is extraordinary. It would be akin to the University of Pennsylvania offering free tuition to all qualifying public school students in Philadelphia, or George Washington and Georgetown universities offering the same deal to similar public school students in Washington.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 27, 2013
In the spring of 1963, when I was a student at the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General Corps School in Charlottesville, Va., the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to town to speak to the student body of the University of Virginia. At the time, my brother, Henry Floyd Johnson, was studying at UVA while also serving as the pastor of a church in Charlottesville. He had known King for some time, and took me to meet him on the evening that he was scheduled to speak. King greeted me warmly, and we chatted for about 15 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Afghan Stories Director Taran Davies and producer Walied Osman, an Afghan-American, set out to examine how decades of war have affected the Afghan people. Alma Mater Set in the days leading up to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the film centers on Harvard professor Arthur Knight, whose claim to fame is that he was Kennedy's freshman roommate. American Eunuchs (Who Needs Balls?) Each year in the United States hundreds of men choose to be castrated and re-invent their sexual identity for reasons other than sexual reassignment.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 8, 2006
In all the furor the past week about "racism at Johns Hopkins University" -- as the headline in the Nov. 4-Nov. 10 Afro American puts it -- aren't people forgetting something? One of those somethings is the Hopkins Baltimore Scholars program. Students in Baltimore public schools -- which have an overwhelmingly black population -- who are accepted at Hopkins pay no tuition. It's a sure way to increase the number of black students on the Hopkins campus. The program is extraordinary. It would be akin to the University of Pennsylvania offering free tuition to all qualifying public school students in Philadelphia, or George Washington and Georgetown universities offering the same deal to similar public school students in Washington.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
McDaniel College will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a film and lecture tomorrow. The film, Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin, will be shown at 3 p.m. in Lewis Recitation Hall's Decker Auditorium. One of the first "freedom riders," Rustin was an adviser to King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, but was denied his place in the limelight because he was openly gay. Human relations expert Jaiya John, founder and executive director of Soul Water Rising, an educational mission devoted to improving human relations, combating prejudice and fostering spiritual growth, will speak at 7 p.m. in Alumni Hall.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | April 22, 1992
Washington -- Because ideas have ancestors, and because ideas have consequences, let me tell you about my friend Tom Kahn. He died recently, too soon, at age 53. But he lived an important life.I met Tom in 1971 when he came to Washington to be a speechwriter on the presidential campaign of Sen. Henry ''Scoop'' Jackson. At the scribbler's trade, he was the best. He had the two qualities great speechwriters need: He could write in American, and he had thought-out ideas.I used to kid Tom that he and his activist friends were a cabal, ingeniously trying to bury the Soviet Union in a blizzard of letterheads.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Boyd Cothran | January 20, 2005
Counter-Inaugural Ball All dressed up with nowhere to go for tonight's presidential inauguration? Redefeat bush.com hosts a Counter-Inaugural Ball at Washington's upscale nightclub Dream. The event kicks off with a catered buffet and open bar. For entertainment, the Swing States Road Show will perform its partisan blend of blues, folk, swing, reggae and spoken word. If Dream is not your scene, then the Provisions Library offers its own counter-inaugural event tonight: a film screening and panel discussion of Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Wicker and Tom Wicker,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 2003
Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin, by John D'Emilio (Free Press, 568 pages, $35), is one of the saddest stories you will ever read. Rustin was a charismatic leader, a lifelong pacifist, an imprisoned conscientious objector during World War II, a leading American teacher of Gandhian nonviolence, perhaps the prime mentor to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and the major planner and organizer of black America's triumphal March on Washington in...
ENTERTAINMENT
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
Afghan Stories Director Taran Davies and producer Walied Osman, an Afghan-American, set out to examine how decades of war have affected the Afghan people. Alma Mater Set in the days leading up to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the film centers on Harvard professor Arthur Knight, whose claim to fame is that he was Kennedy's freshman roommate. American Eunuchs (Who Needs Balls?) Each year in the United States hundreds of men choose to be castrated and re-invent their sexual identity for reasons other than sexual reassignment.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 1997
"Bayard Rustin," by Jervis Anderson. HarperCollins. 400 pages. $28.This gracefully crafted biography chronicles the life of one the more remarkable figures of the century. Many were more visible, but none exerted a greater nor more beneficial impact on racial progress in our time than Bayard Rustin.Most people who can even remember Rustin probably would identify him as the modest, self-effacing ascetic who organized the March on Washington that provided the platform for Martin Luther King's incomparable "I have a dream" speech.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | November 26, 1991
Washington -- One of the subplots that run through the oral histories of the Civil Rights Documentation Project at Howard University is the passion of Jews in the great ''Negro'' movement of the 1960s.A Negro Freedom Rider taking the dangerous bus trip through Georgia -- this is 1961 -- asks the rider next to him, a white man, why he is taking this chance. ''I am a Jew,'' the white man `D answered. ''Perhaps if someone had taken freedom rides in Germany, my people might not have been massacred by Hitler.
FEATURES
By Emily Eakin and Emily Eakin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2003
His most famous words - "I have a dream" - were extemporized. And he routinely delivered whole sermons from memory. But as an extraordinary exhibition of his papers, books and other documents at Sotheby's auction house in New York makes clear, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was an inveterate scribbler who jotted down thoughts and outlined speeches on the backs of envelopes and church programs. He also scrawled entire essays in the flyleaves of paperbacks. Occupying 20,000 square feet - nearly one floor - of the auction house, the sprawling exhibition opened to the public yesterday and runs through Sept.
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