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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
The O'Malley administration began its push yesterday for an ambitious overhaul of restrictions on building near the Chesapeake Bay, enlisting the father of the state's bay cleanup effort to warn lawmakers that action is needed to save the troubled estuary. But it was clear at a Senate hearing yesterday that the governor's broad Critical Area reform proposal faces a stiff challenge from local officials and real estate interests who said they worry it would grant the state too much authority and infringe on waterfront landowners' property rights.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 26, 2013
I was not prepared for the dramatic and clear view of the Bay Bridge that I had on my recent visit to Edgemere. I went in search of the old Bay Shore amusement park, where Baltimore families once traveled by streetcar to spend the day, and I found a delightful summertime oasis, minus the old carousel, roller coaster and bowling alley. And while many of the 1906 park pavilions and rather grand architectural pieces vanished after World War II, enough survives to satisfy anyone with an amateur's interest in archaeology.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 26, 2013
I was not prepared for the dramatic and clear view of the Bay Bridge that I had on my recent visit to Edgemere. I went in search of the old Bay Shore amusement park, where Baltimore families once traveled by streetcar to spend the day, and I found a delightful summertime oasis, minus the old carousel, roller coaster and bowling alley. And while many of the 1906 park pavilions and rather grand architectural pieces vanished after World War II, enough survives to satisfy anyone with an amateur's interest in archaeology.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 13, 2008
Walter D. Hyle Jr., a former Civil Defense director for Baltimore County who had been manager of the old Bay Shore Park, died of a heart attack May 6 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised on Luzerne Avenue, he attended St. Andrew's Parochial School and was a 1936 Calvert Hall College High School graduate. He was later active in its Quarterback Club. He served in the Army from 1940 to 1944 and was later in the Maryland National Guard. He managed Bay Shore Park in the 1940s and held the same position at New Bay Shore Park on the Chesapeake Bay. He worked for the Internal Revenue Service until being named Civil Defense director for Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 5, 1991
On a Saturday in August 85 years ago, city streetcars bolted toward the cooling waters of Chesapeake Bay.Their destination was the new Bay Shore Park, where Professor Giuseppe Aiala's Royal Artillery Band was brassily playing "You're a Grand Old Flag" and other hit songs of the day. Beach-goers spent the day avoiding sea nettles, getting a sunburn and eating 50-cent fish dinners. The park was a smashing success.When dark came, thousands of carbon-filament lights outlined the towers and gazebos of the park's pavilions, restaurant and bowling alley.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1998
For 41 years, until its closing in 1947, Bay Shore Park was the place Baltimoreans traveled to by open-air streetcar to beat the searing summer heat and humidity.The 12-mile trip from downtown by No. 26 streetcar took nearly an hour as it swayed and clanged through East Baltimore and then by way of Eastern Avenue to Dundalk and Turner's Station.Zipping across Bear Creek Bridge to Ninth and D streets at Sparrows Point, revelers then transferred to a three-car "jerkwater" which delivered them, after a 10-minute ride, to Bay Shore Park at the edge of Chesapeake Bay.Commissioned by United Railways and designed by Otto Simonson and Theodore Wells Pietsch, the park's three distinctive casino-like structures -- confections with broad porches and verandas -- resembled those found in Cape May. Here day-trippers caught the balmy breezes and cooled off in the waters of the bay or sat on a white, sandy beach.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | June 13, 1995
A NEW BOOK by Baltimore writer Victoria Crenson, "Bay Shore Park: Death and Life of An Amusement Park," is drawing attention to the once famous seaside resort that long was a part of Baltimore life.Ms. Crenson's focus is on nature's persistent and magnificent reclaiming of the land, surely a powerful reason for remembering the old place. But there are other reasons as well.On humid summer Sundays in the 1930s and '40s, Baltimoreans resembled lemmings moving inexorably toward the sea, via any streetcar that would get them to Fayette and Pearl streets in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By James M. Merritt | June 1, 1993
EIGHTY years ago, when my family chose Riverview Park for a day's outing, we boarded a No. 10 streetcar at North and Maryland avenues. This trolley was a 12-bench open model popularly known as a "summer car." Its seats held seven or eight adults or about a dozen squirming kids. Fares (a nickel for grown-ups, 3 cents for kids) were passed to the conductor side-stepping along the running board.For a 6-year-old who seldom left his neighborhood, it was a thrilling trip! The car wound down to the teeming Pratt Street waterfront and then east past the slips crowded with bay steamers, coastal liners and Eastern Shore sailing vessels loaded with produce.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 13, 2008
Walter D. Hyle Jr., a former Civil Defense director for Baltimore County who had been manager of the old Bay Shore Park, died of a heart attack May 6 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised on Luzerne Avenue, he attended St. Andrew's Parochial School and was a 1936 Calvert Hall College High School graduate. He was later active in its Quarterback Club. He served in the Army from 1940 to 1944 and was later in the Maryland National Guard. He managed Bay Shore Park in the 1940s and held the same position at New Bay Shore Park on the Chesapeake Bay. He worked for the Internal Revenue Service until being named Civil Defense director for Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
When Victoria Crenson first visited the old Bay Shore amusement park on a cold winter day in 1991, she saw its ruins among the trees.A year later, in spring, she found the park blanketed by foliage, bushes, vines, flowers and weeds. She could see nothing else. ** "It was amazing how in 45 years something so evident had become so invisible," the Mount Washington writer said.In that contrast lay the seed of Ms. Crenson's latest book, "Bay Shore Park, The Death and Life of an Amusement Park."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
The O'Malley administration began its push yesterday for an ambitious overhaul of restrictions on building near the Chesapeake Bay, enlisting the father of the state's bay cleanup effort to warn lawmakers that action is needed to save the troubled estuary. But it was clear at a Senate hearing yesterday that the governor's broad Critical Area reform proposal faces a stiff challenge from local officials and real estate interests who said they worry it would grant the state too much authority and infringe on waterfront landowners' property rights.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1999
Nearly a week after erratic Dennis began threatening the mid-Atlantic region, officials in Ocean City and on the Delaware shore were dealing with a new problem yesterday -- a thick coating of salt on electrical lines that has caused intermittent power outages throughout Delmarva.As the meandering tropical storm and its 60-mph winds lingered about 190 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C. -- as it has for days -- authorities in Maryland and Delaware said they were going ahead with plans for a relatively normal, albeit cloudy, Labor Day weekend.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
OCEAN CITY -- The Maryland Coastal Bays Program unveiled a 120-page proposal yesterday that supporters say is a blueprint for conservation in the next century but that contains a proposal for a no-build shoreline buffer similar to restrictions on Chesapeake Bay waterfront property.Supporters and detractors agree that the plan could affect watermen, developers, recreational boaters, sport fishermen, farmers and the tourist industry.The management plan covers Assawoman, Isle of Wight, Sinepuxent and Chincoteague bays and smaller tributaries that make up a marshy, 175-square-mile watershed that is the incubator for a wide range of marine life -- and a significant part of Worcester County's $2-billion-a-year tourist industry.
FEATURES
By Reed Hellman and Reed Hellman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 1998
The front lawn of St. Michaels' Two Swan Inn offers one of the finest harbor views on the East Coast. Guests spend entire vacations perched in fan chairs, ogling a panoply of yachtdom cruising by on the Miles River, literally at arm's distance. But, after the obvious enticements wear thin, St. Michaels is a great place to leave.Getting out of town reveals the less varnished Chesapeake, rich in history, natural spectacle and singular experiences. Using St. Michaels as a hub for exploring the Eastern Shore puts you just down the road from an abundance of singular destinations.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1998
For 41 years, until its closing in 1947, Bay Shore Park was the place Baltimoreans traveled to by open-air streetcar to beat the searing summer heat and humidity.The 12-mile trip from downtown by No. 26 streetcar took nearly an hour as it swayed and clanged through East Baltimore and then by way of Eastern Avenue to Dundalk and Turner's Station.Zipping across Bear Creek Bridge to Ninth and D streets at Sparrows Point, revelers then transferred to a three-car "jerkwater" which delivered them, after a 10-minute ride, to Bay Shore Park at the edge of Chesapeake Bay.Commissioned by United Railways and designed by Otto Simonson and Theodore Wells Pietsch, the park's three distinctive casino-like structures -- confections with broad porches and verandas -- resembled those found in Cape May. Here day-trippers caught the balmy breezes and cooled off in the waters of the bay or sat on a white, sandy beach.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | June 13, 1995
A NEW BOOK by Baltimore writer Victoria Crenson, "Bay Shore Park: Death and Life of An Amusement Park," is drawing attention to the once famous seaside resort that long was a part of Baltimore life.Ms. Crenson's focus is on nature's persistent and magnificent reclaiming of the land, surely a powerful reason for remembering the old place. But there are other reasons as well.On humid summer Sundays in the 1930s and '40s, Baltimoreans resembled lemmings moving inexorably toward the sea, via any streetcar that would get them to Fayette and Pearl streets in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | August 18, 1992
BALTIMORE is hardly observing dog days the way it has in summers past! In fact, many a dog would rather be outside, where it's nice and cool. This Glimpses is real nostalgia, then; it takes us back, via home movies, to those thrilling days when the city sweltered in mid-August.Reel 1: It's dusk of a hot summer night. A crowd jams what appears to be a dairy store. It's selling chocolate milk, ice cream, milkshakes. This is Emerson's Farms. Located near Greenspring Valley and Falls Road, Emerson's Farms sold dairy products from the milk of its own cows.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | October 20, 1991
For more than a week, Civil Air Patrol volunteers flew repeated sorties over fields and forests on the Eastern Shore, where a student pilot disappeared. They searched the beaches and sent divers into the Chesapeake Bay but still came up blank.And as they suspended their air search last Monday, the mystery deepened. How could an airplane 23 feet long with a wingspan of 25 feet just disappear? Without a trace? On the Eastern Shore?It is not as surprising as it might appear, say CAP officers who are veterans of dozens of searches for downed private planes.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
When Victoria Crenson first visited the old Bay Shore amusement park on a cold winter day in 1991, she saw its ruins among the trees.A year later, in spring, she found the park blanketed by foliage, bushes, vines, flowers and weeds. She could see nothing else. ** "It was amazing how in 45 years something so evident had become so invisible," the Mount Washington writer said.In that contrast lay the seed of Ms. Crenson's latest book, "Bay Shore Park, The Death and Life of an Amusement Park."
NEWS
By James M. Merritt | June 1, 1993
EIGHTY years ago, when my family chose Riverview Park for a day's outing, we boarded a No. 10 streetcar at North and Maryland avenues. This trolley was a 12-bench open model popularly known as a "summer car." Its seats held seven or eight adults or about a dozen squirming kids. Fares (a nickel for grown-ups, 3 cents for kids) were passed to the conductor side-stepping along the running board.For a 6-year-old who seldom left his neighborhood, it was a thrilling trip! The car wound down to the teeming Pratt Street waterfront and then east past the slips crowded with bay steamers, coastal liners and Eastern Shore sailing vessels loaded with produce.
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