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NEWS
March 25, 1993
The major villains in the sordid story of the Bay Ridg Gardens apartments in Annapolis are owners Angelo Munafo and John Pica Sr. But the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the city of Annapolis also bear a share of blame because they ignored the owners' neglect for too long.The decline of Bay Ridge has been no secret. The low-income apartments, built in the 1970s, have been going downhill for years.While the owners were more than diligent about collecting rents and taking advantage of tax breaks, they put nary a dime into the routine maintenance needed to keep any property fit for habitation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
A contemporary three-bedroom Colonial on the Annapolis waterfront sold recently for $1.35 million after being on the market for about eight months, according to the home's listing agent. The 3,100-square-foot home at 56 E. Lake Drive in the Bay Ridge neighborhood backs against the sheltered waters of Lake Ogleton, on the edge of the Chesapeake Bay. It was originally listed for $1,795,000. Pat Ogle, who sold the house for the owners, said the home's top selling points were its water views and the second-story deck off the master bedroom that overlooks the half-acre property, including a private pier on the waterfront.
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NEWS
January 6, 1994
A man armed with a handgun robbed Little Caesar's Pizza in the 900 block of Bay Ridge Road about 9:20 p.m. Tuesday.Manager Robert Heverling told police the man, who was dressed in a green coat and blue jeans, walked into the store, announced he had a gun and demanded that the cash register be opened.When Mr. Heverling opened the cash drawer, the man removed money and ran out of the store.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
The two-story, wood-framed house on the Annapolis waterfront has seen better days. The walls are cracked, the blue carpet is worn, and floorboards creak under foot. But in the attic, torn pieces of a poster hang on the wall promoting a "gypsy band" concert more than a century ago - just one of the intriguing signs of the rich history connected with this dwelling built by one of Annapolis' most prominent 19th-century watermen. Advocates for building a National Sailing Hall of Fame in this Chesapeake Bay sailing mecca say the City Dock lot on which the old home sits would be an ideal location for their new $20 million museum.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 20, 1997
A two-alarm fire yesterday at Bay Ridge Beach destroyed one beach pavilion, damaged a second and scorched five vehicles, Anne Arundel fire officials said.No one was injured in the fire, which was reported shortly before 3 p.m. on the Chesapeake Bay beach at Herndon Avenue.The fire destroyed a screened-in, wood-frame pavilion and spread to the second one, said Capt. Allan Graves, a county EMS/Fire/Rescue spokesman.The cause of the blaze was not known."It's under investigation," Graves said.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
When plastic surveyors' ribbons first appeared tied to tulip poplar and oak trees in Bay Ridge, an enclave of old summer cottages and modern mini-mansions southeast of Annapolis, residents got nervous. Then they got organized. About a year later, a few of those ribbons remain. But the surveyors, and all they represent in communities such as this one once targeted for a new housing development, are gone. Bay Ridge residents didn't engage attorneys or wait out revision of an outdated land development law. Instead, leaders representing the 400 homeowners negotiated a contract last month to purchase the 115 acres of woodland, beaches and bluffs to preserve them.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
Sharla Johnson said it was "sad" that conditions at the Bay Ridge Gardens apartment complex had to deteriorate so badly before residents and Annapolis officials were moved to action.But Ms. Johnson, a three-year resident of the complex, said she was hopeful that renewed interest of residents in the tenants council will mean a change for the better for Bay Ridge Gardens."Maybe if [the tenants] owned it, we would have more say in getting things fixed," she said.Ms. Johnson's sentiments were echoed by many of some 100 residents who turned out for last night's tenants council meeting at Mount Moriah African Methodist Episcopal Church.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
Annapolis backs off plans for junction Annapolis officials have backed away from a consultant's plan to turn a busy junction on Bay Ridge Road into more of an urban center, noting a heated response from county residents who attended two public meetings. But Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said yesterday there would be more meetings regarding the Annapolis Neck area and more development. "The staff felt like they had been uncivilly bashed and the meetings were counterproductive and we need to have productive meetings," she said.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
Annapolis city officials moved yesterday to condemn a dilapidated, low-income apartment complex that has been neglected for years.Although the city began condemnation proceedings, officials delayed posting a notice to give investors that own Bay Ridge Gardens a final opportunity to start fixing faulty electrical wiring and other safety hazards."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A dilapidated, low-income apartment complex in Annapolis that was condemned by the city last month would receive a $4.3 million face lift under a proposal by a Rhode Island company.Landex Corp., a Warwick-based investment company, wants to buy and completely overhaul the brick complex off Bay Ridge Avenue.In a detailed proposal to the Annapolis city government, the company outlined plans to install new roofs, furnaces and siding, as well as replace kitchen and bathroom fixtures in the 197-unit Bay Ridge Gardens.
NEWS
July 30, 2006
Seventy Julys ago, two international diplomats lent a bit of exotic flavor to the community of Bay Ridge. In 1936, The Sun reported, an Egyptian and a Soviet diplomat stayed just a few beach blocks away from each other, frequently entertaining other ambassadors from Washington who joined them for a swim or tennis set. Yet their styles were a striking contrast. As The Sun noted, "Bay Ridge residents observed, at one extreme, the gregarious Egyptian Mohamed Amine Youssef, moving around the beach in his blue-striped `summer pajamas,' chatting with everyone, knowing all the children by their first names.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
ISSUE: Annapolis officials have backed away from a consultant's plan to turn a busy junction on Bay Ridge Road into more of an urban center, noting a heated response from county residents who attended two public meetings. The consulting firm had recommended upgrading the area around Bay Ridge Road, Hillsmere Drive and Georgetown Road by redeveloping an aging plaza, acquiring homes for reuse and extending Georgetown Road. The plan called for turning Bay Ridge Road into a Main Street-style thoroughfare lined with shops, bike lanes, sidewalks and on-street parking.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
Annapolis backs off plans for junction Annapolis officials have backed away from a consultant's plan to turn a busy junction on Bay Ridge Road into more of an urban center, noting a heated response from county residents who attended two public meetings. But Mayor Ellen O. Moyer said yesterday there would be more meetings regarding the Annapolis Neck area and more development. "The staff felt like they had been uncivilly bashed and the meetings were counterproductive and we need to have productive meetings," she said.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
A preliminary city plan to make neighborhoods off Bay Ridge Road more of an urban center is drawing criticism and anger from residents, who fear homes and businesses will be lost to development and traffic will get worse. The study presented to about 250 residents on Wednesday night at Georgetown East Elementary School is based on Annapolis' 1998 comprehensive plan, proposing a "mixed use center" featuring residential, retail and commercial space. Completed by a Philadelphia firm, it calls for a Main Street-like Bay Ridge Road with trees, bike lanes, on-street parking and an additional traffic light that would slow traffic to 25 mph. But residents of the Annapolis Neck, where commuters swap stories about going 3 miles in 40 minutes in rush-hour traffic, say enough is enough, and that they don't need another video store, pharmacy or supermarket.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2005
As in many places where the water meets the land, life around Annapolis can be a pretty pricey affair. A political hub, a maritime magnet, an academic center for the nation's military and a tourist playground for much of the year, Annapolis draws the well-heeled and the disposable income that comes with them as flames draw moths. But while money talks as loudly in these parts as it does anywhere else, it is equally true that in the capital city many of the best things in life are free.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
THIS WEEK, members of the Bay Ridge community south of Annapolis gathered to toast a remarkable tree preservation effort that has spanned 15 years. To preserve the area's magnificent mature forests - 150 acres that were faced with imminent development - residents raised $4 million. More than a decade ago, when that still seemed an almost insurmountable task, L. Eugene Cronin, a leading bay scientist, asked if I could write something on the value of forests to help his community's effort.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
Disregarding recent opposition from Anne Arundel County officials, the Annapolis City Council approved last night a proposal to annex 11.3 wooded acres in the Annapolis Neck Peninsula.The 7-2 vote will likely pave the way for developer Bayhouse Partners to build 50 single-family homes and some commercial establishments in the area, provided the necessary zoning changes are approved. Last night's vote came after several council members promised to carefully study future proposals to annex county land in an already traffic-choked Forest Drive corridor.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 18, 2002
From the day it opened, the waterfront headquarters of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation was expected to consume 51.2 percent less energy than a conventional office building the same size. Now that the building has been in operation for nearly two years, it actually has exceeded those expectations - consuming 52.5 percent less energy than a conventional building, according to monitoring by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, part of the U.S. Department of Energy. It's also showing ways to improve the next generation of "green buildings" - structures designed to be environmentally sound and ecologically sensitive.
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