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NEWS
April 16, 2012
Look who's smiling now? Even as the Maryland General Assembly was heading toward a budgetary train wreck last week, there was one unlikely group that had trouble believing its good fortune coming out of the 90-day session - the state's environmental community. Not only did Maryland's Chesapeake Bay lobby push through a doubling of the flush tax, but it managed to persuade lawmakers to require the state's largest jurisdictions to impose new fees that will be invested in storm water runoff controls.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 9, 2008
A group of Chesapeake Bay scientists and advocates is calling for new, more aggressive efforts to restore the bay, saying that the current approach has not worked and that the troubled estuary is getting worse. The group - more than a dozen scientists, policy specialists and activists - presented its recommendations to the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's bay program office in Annapolis on the eve of today's 25th anniversary of the formal launch of the bay restoration effort.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Government officials involved in the multistate Chesapeake Bay cleanup pledged Monday to broaden and accelerate the long-running effort, including a vow to address the impacts of climate change on the ailing estuary. Governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Delaware signed a new bay restoration agreement in Annapolis, which for the first time formally encompasses "upstream" states with smaller slices of the 64,000-square-mile watershed, including New York and West Virginia.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
As a major holder of Chesapeake shoreline, the Pentagon renewed its support for the bay cleanup yesterday, and other federal agencies pledged to help in the restoration.The "ecosystem management" agreement signed in Washington points up the fact that the federal government not only helps regulate the bay environment but also is a significant user and potential polluter of the Chesapeake.The accord seeks to reduce emissions of toxic chemicals and nutrients from federal lands -- as the government has pressed industry and others to do on private lands.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
Maryland will have to spend about $7 billion for the state to keep its promise to fully restore the Chesapeake Bay by 2010, according to a new analysis by top state officials. That's about $1 billion a year, the same amount the state spends to build roads and expand the Washington-area subway system. But the anticipated funding for bay restoration falls well short of the amount needed, said Chuck Fox, secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. If current levels of federal, state, local and private environmental spending continue through the rest of the decade, $4.4 billion will be available for bay restoration, leaving a $2.6 billion shortfall, Fox said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The Ehrlich administration moved yesterday to allay opposition to its plan for a voluntary Chesapeake Bay restoration fund by proposing to require that donations to the program be disclosed. The Department of Natural Resources moved to amend its bill, part of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s legislative agenda, in response to concerns that powerful interests could seek favor with the administration by making secret gifts to the fund. "It's not meant to curry favor with the governor. It's meant, quite frankly, to help clean up our bay," Ehrlich policy adviser Bernie Marczyk told the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. - Marking the 20th anniversary of the landmark agreement to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, the governors of Maryland and Virginia kicked off yesterday a campaign to make bay restoration a top national priority in hopes of securing billions in federal aid. "We are going to launch an effort to raise the Chesapeake Bay issue to one of national importance," Virginia Gov. Mark R. Warner said at a meeting on the George Mason University campus....
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2003
Twenty years after state and federal officials pledged to revive the troubled Chesapeake Bay, federal support for the nationally acclaimed restoration effort is eroding, environmentalists and bay managers say. The bay restoration has also lost momentum in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, the principal states of the Chesapeake watershed. Pollution, scientists say, must be reduced twice as much by 2010 as it was during the past two decades to meet restoration goals. The states' voluntary involvement makes strong oversight by the Environmental Protection Agency a necessity, advocates say. "But in the past two years, I feel EPA has become more a facilitator, playing defense when we need great leadership," says J. Charles Fox, who recently resigned as Maryland's natural resources secretary to work for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Carol M. Browner is poised to take on a symbolic job today: leadership of the Chesapeake Bay restoration effort.The EPA chief is expected to be elected to a one-year term as chairwoman of the bay program's executive council when it meets today in Reston, Va., to review progress in the 12-year-old cleanup campaign.Ms. Browner would succeed Virginia Gov. George F. Allen, whose year at the helm of the multistate effort has been marked by clashes with the EPA over auto emission controls and pollution enforcement and complaints from opponents that the state has relaxed environmental protections to benefit industry.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Federally funded efforts to curtail farm pollution of the Chesapeake Bay are falling short, and recent spending cuts by Congress cast doubt on the efforts' ultimate success, an environmental group said Monday. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation said farmers planted only a fraction of the stream-side trees last year than they should have to meet goals set for creating forested buffers to reduce polluted runoff from fields, feedlots and pastures. Maryland and the other five states in the bay watershed have pledged collectively to establish 185,000 acres of new forested buffers on farmland by 2025, the Annapolis-based group said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2013
Millions in federal funds are to be spent in Maryland to help protect Smith Island, Crisfield and other coastal communities from devastating flooding like that caused by last year's Superstorm Sandy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced Thursday her department would dole out $162 million for 45 restoration and research projects to help Atlantic coast communities fend off storm surges and rising sea level.  The restoration projects focus on shielding marsh and wetlands at wildlife refuges, but studies are to be funded that would improve flooding and storm resilience of coastal communiites as well.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | January 2, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's health appears to be slowly rebounding, but still has a long way to go to be considered fully recovered, according to the region's largest environmental group. The Annapolis-based Chesapeake Bay Foundation rated the estuary's overall condition last year slightly better than it was two years ago, when the group took its last comprehensive look.  CBF gave the bay a score of 32 out of 70 for 2012, a one-point gain from two years ago and up four points since 2008.
NEWS
By J. Richard Gray | December 17, 2012
The Susquehanna River and its big dams have been in the news lately. A handful of Maryland county officials would like you to believe the dams are the primary ill of the Chesapeake Bay. They claim that because sediment reservoirs behind the Conowingo Dam are at capacity, instead of trapping pollutants during storms, the dam now allows two pollutants - phosphorus and sediment - to flow downstream at alarming rates. They argue that years of restoration progress have been erased and that current bay restoration efforts do not address these issues.
NEWS
By Roy A. Hoagland | October 11, 2012
When the Chesapeake Bay restoration program began in earnest in 1983, with the signing of the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, it was hailed as the beginning of a new era of interjurisdictional partnering to save a national treasure. And so it was. With the recognition that a "cooperative approach" was needed "to fully address the extent, complexity, and sources of pollutants entering the Bay," Pennsylvania Gov. Richard Thornburgh, Maryland Gov. Harry Hughes, Virginia Gov. Chuck Robb, D.C. Mayor Marion Barry and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William Ruckelshaus created the Chesapeake Executive Council with a commitment to "assess and oversee implementation of coordinated plans to improve and protect the water quality and living resources of the Chesapeake Bay. " This unique partnership of federal, state and city governments, of Republican and Democratic leadership, grew to be recognized internationally as one of the most successful multijurisdictional restoration efforts in the world.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 28, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup got a shot in the arm today (Tuesday, 8/28), as federal and nonprofit officials announced grants totaling $9.2 million for planting trees, restoring wetlands, installing rain gardens and other projects across the watershed. The announcement was made at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where one of the grants will help replace an existing parking lot with rain-absorbing "pervious concrete," intended to reduce polluted storm-water runoff.  The press conference was planned to highlight such urban water-quality efforts, with more than $800,000 in grants being handed out for projects in the Baltimore area alone.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
There's a popular saying in the halls of the State House in Annapolis: "Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die. " It's used most often to describe government's classic conundrum - as laudable as a goal might be, people would rather not sacrifice to attain it. That could well describe the flotilla of local government leaders who continue to protest bitterly over the projected cost of a Chesapeake Bay cleanup and Gov. Martin O'Malley's...
NEWS
January 12, 2010
The Sun's January 11 op-ed accurately describes the Department of the Environment's focus on enforcing environmental laws that, despite resource constraints, resulted in a 34 percent increase in enforcement actions in 2008 ("Tougher policing of water quality needed"). Our annual report will soon detail an additional 7 percent increase in 2009. But while there are certainly differences of opinion, the claim that "nobody is doing anything" to clean up the Chesapeake Bay is simply incorrect.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
Look who's smiling now? Even as the Maryland General Assembly was heading toward a budgetary train wreck last week, there was one unlikely group that had trouble believing its good fortune coming out of the 90-day session - the state's environmental community. Not only did Maryland's Chesapeake Bay lobby push through a doubling of the flush tax, but it managed to persuade lawmakers to require the state's largest jurisdictions to impose new fees that will be invested in storm water runoff controls.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
There's a popular saying in the halls of the State House in Annapolis: "Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die. " It's used most often to describe government's classic conundrum - as laudable as a goal might be, people would rather not sacrifice to attain it. That could well describe the flotilla of local government leaders who continue to protest bitterly over the projected cost of a Chesapeake Bay cleanup and Gov. Martin O'Malley's...
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