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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 2, 2007
Guess who was the highfalutin cook of my family when I was growing up? Me. I stayed busy whipping up French dishes a la Julia Child or concocting chili-laden Chinese stir-fries. My mother was more than happy to stay out of the kitchen, but she was a very good basic cook. Her fried fish, shrimp scampi and this homey slumgullion were among her classics. Slumgullion is said to be old Gold Rush slang for stews made from leftovers, according to The New Food Lover's Companion. My mother always started hers fresh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Eastern Shore Oyster Stew from Thames Street Oyster House Thames Street Oyster House is known for its impressive selection of oysters available on the half-shell and for Chef Eric Houseknecht's sophisticated food. His oyster stew is "creamy, brothy and addicting," says Thames Street's owner, Candace Beattie. It's also simple enough for anyone to make at home. Yield: About 4 1/2 cups 2 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup celery, diced 1/4 cup yellow onion, diced 1/2 cup dry vermouth 1 pint shucked oysters in their liquor 1 pint cream 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Westminster Bakers Co. oyster crackers for serving In a 2 1/2-quart pot over medium heat, slowly melt the butter.
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NEWS
November 29, 2006
Asparagus Steamed in a Paper Bag Serves 4 1 pound medium asparagus, tough ends trimmed extra-virgin olive oil sea salt and cracked pepper 1/2 lemon, sliced paper-thin 1 bay leaf Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and arrange an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Get yourself a paper bag large enough to hold the asparagus comfortably. Throw the asparagus in there and drizzle the outside of the bag with olive oil to keep the bag from burning. Sprinkle the asparagus with sea salt and cracked pepper and toss in the lemon slices and bay leaf.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 16, 2012
Lady Maryland: a cocktail with a cause, a buzz with a benefit. How could you possibly say no to drinking for charity? That alone sold me. But for those of the more skeptical palate, the refreshing Lady Maryland at Waterfront Kitchen stands alone as an easy warmer-weather sip. Waterfront Kitchen, on the water's edge of Thames Street in Fells Point, is a big believer in sustainability - from using fresh, local ingredients to helping out...
FEATURES
By Health fare | November 20, 1990
Ground beef comes to the rescue in this quick and easy entree. This dish, served with a fresh salad, would make a great cold-weather meal. Most cooks will need to buy only six ingredients to make this 30-minutes or less dinner.WHAT YOU NEED1 cup uncooked macaroni1 pound lean ground beef1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced1 cup chopped onion1 clove garlic, minced1 6-ounce can no-salt-added tomato paste3/4 cup water1 cup low-sodium ketchup1 small bay leaf1 teaspoon sugar1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper1/4 teaspoon oregano1/4 teaspoon basilCook macaroni according to package directions, omitting salt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Eastern Shore Oyster Stew from Thames Street Oyster House Thames Street Oyster House is known for its impressive selection of oysters available on the half-shell and for Chef Eric Houseknecht's sophisticated food. His oyster stew is "creamy, brothy and addicting," says Thames Street's owner, Candace Beattie. It's also simple enough for anyone to make at home. Yield: About 4 1/2 cups 2 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup celery, diced 1/4 cup yellow onion, diced 1/2 cup dry vermouth 1 pint shucked oysters in their liquor 1 pint cream 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Westminster Bakers Co. oyster crackers for serving In a 2 1/2-quart pot over medium heat, slowly melt the butter.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | January 30, 1991
Take a look at this low-fat magic! One pound of meat stretches to satisfy eight hungry diners when you mix it with hearty lentils and lots of vegetables. Because lentils contain almost no fat, they keep the fat content of the stew at a low seven grams per serving while providing lots of protein, B vitamins and iron. This recipe makes plenty, so you may want to freeze half for another time.Beef Stew with Lentils1 pound boneless beef chuck steak, trimmed of fatNon-stick spray coating7 cups beef broth1 cup chopped onion1 cup sliced celery1 cup sliced carrot1 1/2 cups lentils, rinsed and drained1 14 1/2 -ounce can stewed tomatoes1 bay leaf1 9-ounce package frozen Italian-style green beansCut meat into one-half-inch pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
I woke up this morning hungry for some good homemade Corned Beef and Cabbage. I found this one in the old Meal Planner archives. Looks easy enough. Who makes a good corned beef and cabbage around town? If you have a good homemade corned beef recipe, or can vouch for a good restaurant version, let us know about it. Corned Beef and Cabbage      Preparation time: about 30 minutes     Cooking time: 3 hours and 15 minutes        1 3 1/2-pound flat-cut and well-trimmed corned beef brisket     1 onion, studded with 10 whole cloves     3 large cloves garlic     3 each large sprigs fresh thyme and flat-leaf parsley, tied together     1 large bay leaf     1 teaspoon mustard seed     1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns     12 small white onions (about 2 ounces)
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 7, 2004
Lentils are a great cupboard staple that don't get enough attention. As easily prepared as pasta, but more healthful, they can expand your midweek culinary repertoire. (They're usually sold in bags, and are located in the market near the beans.) We like to use chicken-apple sausages that are sold already cooked, such as the Sausages by Amy brand, because they speed preparation. The slightly sweet taste of the sausage is complemented by the orange zest in the lentils. As long as you've got the grill going, slice up some bell peppers and throw them on, too. Finish them with a little olive oil, salt and pepper.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2005
Helen Dahlquist from Salem, Ore., was looking for an easy recipe for oven stew. Both Karen Bain of Silverton, Ore., and B.J. Martin of Keiser, Ore., sent in a recipe for "Stay-a-bed Stew" from the I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. As the author says in her notes, this recipe is for "those days when you're en negligee, en bed, with a murder story and a box of bonbons, or possibly a good case of flu." This is a truly simple, yet delicious, recipe for beef stew. And unlike many beef-stew recipes, it is not necessary to brown the beef first.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Our friends from the Classic Catering People sent over a couple of St. Patrick's Dayrecipes. If you can't make it out on Saturday, you can turn your home into an Irish pub . Corned Beef Barley and Cabbage Soup Chef Donald Martin The Classic Catering People Ingredients 1 1/4 pounds corned beef brisket, cut into bite size cubes 4 quarts chicken stock 1/2 cup barley 2 onions, diced small 2 celery Stalks, ½...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
I woke up this morning hungry for some good homemade Corned Beef and Cabbage. I found this one in the old Meal Planner archives. Looks easy enough. Who makes a good corned beef and cabbage around town? If you have a good homemade corned beef recipe, or can vouch for a good restaurant version, let us know about it. Corned Beef and Cabbage      Preparation time: about 30 minutes     Cooking time: 3 hours and 15 minutes        1 3 1/2-pound flat-cut and well-trimmed corned beef brisket     1 onion, studded with 10 whole cloves     3 large cloves garlic     3 each large sprigs fresh thyme and flat-leaf parsley, tied together     1 large bay leaf     1 teaspoon mustard seed     1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns     12 small white onions (about 2 ounces)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 29, 2012
To Baltimoreans by residence or in spirit, to Baltimoreans in need of comfort - that is, anyone with a corpuscle of love for the Ravens - I offer what works for me during any winter of discontent: coq au vin. The Super Bowl is a week away, and most of us will watch it, wondering what might have been had Billy Cundiff … or Lee Evans ... but never mind that. There are no comforting words for what happened last Sunday and what will happen next Sunday: our New England nemesis versus the New York franchise the Ravens trounced in the big game 11 long years ago. So let's try the coq au vin. Let me be clear: This is neither tailgate food nor a dish that requires a varsity letter in culinary arts.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Judith Fieldhouse from Hampstead was looking for a recipe for making cinnamon rice. She said it was served in a local restaurant as an accompaniment to duck — "the duck was very good, but the rice was fantastic" — and she has never been able to figure out how to make it. Karen Brannick of Bel Air sent in a recipe she had from a cooking club class at the Maryland Golf & Country Clubs that she thought might be close. This tasty side dish would be a simple addition to any meal.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 2, 2007
Guess who was the highfalutin cook of my family when I was growing up? Me. I stayed busy whipping up French dishes a la Julia Child or concocting chili-laden Chinese stir-fries. My mother was more than happy to stay out of the kitchen, but she was a very good basic cook. Her fried fish, shrimp scampi and this homey slumgullion were among her classics. Slumgullion is said to be old Gold Rush slang for stews made from leftovers, according to The New Food Lover's Companion. My mother always started hers fresh.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | January 17, 2007
Charlie Palmer's Practical Guide to the New American Kitchen By Charlie Palmer A Man & His Meatballs The Hilarious but True Story of a Self-Taught Chef and Restaurateur By John LaFemina with Pam Manela Regan Books / 2006 / $27.95 "Hilarious" might be a stretch, but this memoir/cookbook will be surprisingly absorbing for anyone who's idly dreamed of starting a restaurant. John LaFemina tells an entertaining tale of New York entrepreneurship. A jeweler, he got into the restaurant business as an investor, then an owner and only then decided to master the art and science of cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 16, 2012
Lady Maryland: a cocktail with a cause, a buzz with a benefit. How could you possibly say no to drinking for charity? That alone sold me. But for those of the more skeptical palate, the refreshing Lady Maryland at Waterfront Kitchen stands alone as an easy warmer-weather sip. Waterfront Kitchen, on the water's edge of Thames Street in Fells Point, is a big believer in sustainability - from using fresh, local ingredients to helping out...
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
Judith Fieldhouse from Hampstead was looking for a recipe for making cinnamon rice. She said it was served in a local restaurant as an accompaniment to duck — "the duck was very good, but the rice was fantastic" — and she has never been able to figure out how to make it. Karen Brannick of Bel Air sent in a recipe she had from a cooking club class at the Maryland Golf & Country Clubs that she thought might be close. This tasty side dish would be a simple addition to any meal.
NEWS
November 29, 2006
Asparagus Steamed in a Paper Bag Serves 4 1 pound medium asparagus, tough ends trimmed extra-virgin olive oil sea salt and cracked pepper 1/2 lemon, sliced paper-thin 1 bay leaf Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and arrange an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Get yourself a paper bag large enough to hold the asparagus comfortably. Throw the asparagus in there and drizzle the outside of the bag with olive oil to keep the bag from burning. Sprinkle the asparagus with sea salt and cracked pepper and toss in the lemon slices and bay leaf.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2006
Mildred Hackathorn of Canton, Ohio, wanted a recipe for rice and beans like the dish is made in Puerto Rico and Cuba. Donald Champion of Salisbury, N.C., sent in a recipe he had from his friend Teresa Gonzalez, who along with her husband emigrated from Cuba in the early '60s. He says, "It is an authentic Cuban recipe, and is very tasty." I tested this using canned beans instead of the dried, which require overnight soaking and boiling. That made the dish quick and easy to prepare, yet it was still packed with flavor and just the right degree of spice.
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