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NEWS
August 26, 2010
Your article, "Military urged to boost bay cleanup" (Aug. 26), is just another photo op for Gov. Martin O'Malley to continue to blow smoke. I tried to participate in the nitrogen reducing septic system program last year. I submitted all the forms and heard nothing. When I called back they said the process for filing had changed. I resubmitted and heard nothing. I called back and they were out of money. The funding stopped, because Mr. O'Malley took the money from the fund to use in the general fund.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 9, 2014
Legislators from Maryland and Pennsylvania sparred at a hearing in Annapolis Monday over whether their states are doing too much or too little to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution. In a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing called to review the new bay restoration agreement, Maryland state Sen. Steve Hershey complained about the "astronomical cost" of cleaning up the ailing estuary, calling it an "unfunded mandate" from the federal government. Maryland's share has been estimated at nearly $15 billion through 2025, he noted.
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NEWS
July 16, 2010
I have an article request for your writing team: the threat of water contamination, including to the Chesapeake Bay, resulting from the process of hydraulic fracturing used by natural gas companies, and their arrival to Maryland. Hydraulic fracturing is a process where natural gas companies drill 5,000-plus feet beneath the surface of the earth into shale deposits, or rocks that contain natural gas. In order to extract the gas, they use a mixture of sand, hundreds of thousands of gallons of fresh water, and toxic chemicals to break the gas away from the shale and bring it to the surface.
NEWS
September 9, 2014
I'm left speechless after reading your recent editorial on the Conowingo Dam ( "Damning the dam," Sept. 1). It would seem to me that some Chesapeake Bay cleanup lobbyist wrote this article. Of course we have to continue our efforts to restore the bay. Of course overflowing sewers and stormwater run-off continue to damage the environment, and of course they must be stopped. But your writer is either ignorant of history or too young to remember tropical storm Agnes and how it virtually wiped out the grasses in the bay, causing damage we are still feeling more than 40 years later.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
It should come as no surprise to anyone that the churches are trying to avoid their civic duty to help clean up the toxic chemicals that wash off their property into the Chesapeake Bay ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). We have grown all too accustomed to the churches pontificating about the morals of others while their own moral compass is lacking. William Smith, Baltimore
NEWS
January 14, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay at its deepest is about 174 feet. The rhetoric about cleaning up the bay runs to much more impressive depths. Every politician, of every partisan stripe, has spun the same campaign tale about saving the Chesapeake. For decades, Maryland politicians have been saying all of the right things about cleaning up the bay, yet still here we are, with nothing but speeches. In an executive order from the spring of 2009, President Obama fell in at the back of an august line of chattering Chesapeake politicos.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Now I know how those White House party crashers felt. I received an e-mail Wednesday addressed to "Dear Chesapeake Bay colleague," inviting me to listen in on a "special briefing for the watermen and recreational fishing communities on a new federal strategy for protecting and restoring the Chesapeake Bay watershed." Earlier in the day, the Obama administration announced a "we really mean it this time" plan to restore the bay that involves tons of federal tough love and forces the six states in the watershed to break a sweat on enacting and enforcing stricter pollution and development laws.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday approved a massive $263 million contract for constructing a new facility aimed at curbing pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. The spending panel voted to award the contract to Archer Western Contractors LLC, which will build the first phase of a nutrient removal facility at the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant. More than 90 percent of the contract will be covered by funds from the state's "flush" tax, which charges residents who use municipal wastewater systems, city officials said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 30, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort got a $9.2 million injection of funds Wednesday, as the Environmental Protection Agency and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced grants to 40 projects to reduce storm-water and farm pollution, rebuild oyster reefs and restore trout streams and other habitats across the six-state watershed. More than $2 million is going to projects in Maryland, including nearly $250,000 to the local environmental group Blue Water Baltimore to "engage" churches and other religious groups in the city on how they can reduce their storm-water fees.  Churches and other nonprofits in the city and across Maryland have protested the fees - which for those with large parking lots and buildings could be substantial - prompting politicians to seek to reduce the fees or even repeal the state law requiring they be levied.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 30, 2009
The Obama administration warned Tuesday that Maryland and other states that drain into the Chesapeake Bay face federal sanctions, including roadblocks to growth, if they fail to meet new cleanup goals - though federal officials said they're counting on not having to wield the rod. Environmental activists, in turn, questioned the administration's resolve to do what is needed to restore the bay in the wake of the states having repeatedly failed to...
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 19, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan doubled down on his efforts to seize the issue of the environment from Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown Tuesday, releasing a video in which he criticizes the O'Malley-Brown administration's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay. In the video, Hogan tells viewers that he would help the bay by "standing up for Maryland" and demanding that New York and Pennsylvania do more to clean up the Susquehanna River,...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 12, 2014
Discussing the weather might once have been an alternative to arguing about politics, but not in Maryland in 2014. Before the front that brought torrential rains to Maryland Tuesday had even passed, it became the basis for an attack by Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan on Democratic rival Anthony G. Brown. Precipitation had already been at the center of this year's campaign as a result of Republican opposition to the storm water cleanup fees they have dubbed "the rain tax. " On Tuesday evening, after a day that brought flash flooding around the state and broke rainfall records at BWI, the Hogan campaign released a statement charging that the downpour underscored the O'Malley-Brown administration's failure to protect the Chesapeake Bay from " catastrophic releases of polluted sediment from the long-neglected control reservoirs, or ponds, above the Conowingo Dam. " Hogan was referring to a long-running controversy over how much hard the buildup of decades of sediment behind the dam on the Susquehanna River poses to the bay. Hogan considers it the No. 1 threat to the bay -- a view not shared by the Army Corps of Engineers and many environmentalists.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2014
While Maryland and most other Chesapeake Bay states are making decent progress in reducing pollution fouling the estuary, Pennsylvania is "substantially off track" and will receive additional federal help and backup action if necessary, the Environmental Protection Agency reported Thursday. In a review of how all six bay states and the District of Columbia are doing in meeting their federally mandated cleanup targets, the EPA downgraded its rating of Pennsylvania's performance after finding the state fell short of meeting most of its pollution reduction targets for 2013 and appears unlikely to achieve its next "milestone" goals unless efforts are intensified.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Despite early progress reducing Chesapeake Bay pollution, levels of a key pollutant, phosphorus, have not come down in many rivers in the past decade - and are actually rising in several, officials say. Phosphorus is one of two pollutants blamed for causing algae blooms and "dead zones" in the bay, where fish and shellfish can't get enough oxygen in the water. Plants and animals need phosphorus and nitrogen to live, but the bay is choking on an overdose. The lack of progress in reducing phosphorus is a particular problem on the Delmarva Peninsula, officials say, where there's evidence it is washing off the many farm fields fertilized with chicken manure.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler highlights Maryland's role in  Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts in a new ad that will begin airing tomorrow in his campaign for governor. In a second ad, Gansler pledges “to lift up all of our kids” if elected governor by placing new emphasis on teachers' skill over seniority. The “Protect our Bay” spot will be broadcast in the Washington market, and the “Every Classroom” commercial will air in Baltimore. Neither spot mentions Gansler's Democratic primary opponents, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Del. Heather R. Mizeur.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Chesapeake Bay watershed states that have submitted hefty plans to reduce pollution are looking to the federal government to cover much, if not most, of the added expense of completing the troubled estuary's restoration. The federally mandated cleanup "roadmaps" drawn up by the six states that drain into the bay and by the District of Columbia take nearly 900 pages combined - not counting appendices - to outline how they intend to reduce the pollution that is fouling the Chesapeake and its tributaries.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 22, 2014
Baltimore has joined with other major U.S. cities in defending the federal government's authority to impose a "pollution diet" on the Chesapeake Bay. New York City, with sign-ons from Baltimore, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and San Francisco, filed a "friend-of-the-court" brief Monday in federal appeals court in a case challenging the Environmental Protection Agency 's imposition of bay cleanup goals on Maryland and the other five states...
NEWS
February 21, 2014
I write to applaud the resilience of State Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. in sponsoring the Poultry Fair Share Act ( "Chicken tax sponsor refuses to quit," Feb. 12). As a resident and business owner in Baltimore City, I and my neighbors are already contributing to help sustain the health of the Chesapeake Bay (through measures like the Flush Tax ). The Poultry Fair Share Act is meant to share the cost with the one entity that benefits most from the Eastern Shore, and that's the large chicken companies.
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