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By Pat Hanna Kuehl and Pat Hanna Kuehl,Special to The Sun | October 9, 1994
It's cold, damp and gets dark early -- but those who've been there know the best time to visit Bavaria is during the four weeks before Christmas, when practically every city and hamlet has its own version of a yuletide market.The smell of sizzling sausage and simmering spiced wine permeates the air, flickering candles reflect in every window, and strains of traditional German carols echo through medieval passages. Pedestrians in heavy coats, collars turned up to fend off icy blasts, hurry along narrow, cobblestone streets toward the town square, where long rows of wood stalls with striped-awning rooftops offer a wild variety of merchandise.
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By Janell Sutherland | March 19, 2012
This week, "The Amazing" Race brings us whimsy. Are you ready for whimsy? Then you are ready for Bavaria. Plus, later on, Phil gets meta. I think. Let's go! All teams get the heck out of Italy and travel to Austria via trains. Bopper and Mark started nine hours behind Art and JJ, the Border Patrol Agents. Luckily, with the train schedule and the opening time for their first Route Marker, the teams are almost bunched together. Mental Preparation Let's check in with everybody's heads first and see where they're at. Art and JJ, after two first-place finishes, are glad to be friends and coworkers, not bogged down by romantic entanglements.
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By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 26, 1993
My wife and I weren't wearing lederhosen and boots when we drove into the mountain town of Helen, Ga., but maybe we should have been.After all, Helen looks more like it belongs in Germany's alpine region than in northeast Georgia.Just about every building here resembles an alpine chalet, with steep red terra cotta roofs, walls decorated with painted alpine scenes and flowered window boxes. The shops have names like House of Tyrol and sell such things as cuckoo clocks and beer steins. Restaurants offer sauerbraten, schinken (ham)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 11, 2010
Marie Isabelle Ewing, who witnessed the coming of World War II in Germany and later settled in Baltimore, died of a blood clot Jan. 3 at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Homeland resident was 92. Born Marie Isabelle vom Rath in Berne, Switzerland, she was the daughter of an American mother and a German father, who was a lieutenant in the German army during World War I. As an infant, she lived through the war with her mother and grandparents in Frankfurt, Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | March 19, 2012
This week, "The Amazing" Race brings us whimsy. Are you ready for whimsy? Then you are ready for Bavaria. Plus, later on, Phil gets meta. I think. Let's go! All teams get the heck out of Italy and travel to Austria via trains. Bopper and Mark started nine hours behind Art and JJ, the Border Patrol Agents. Luckily, with the train schedule and the opening time for their first Route Marker, the teams are almost bunched together. Mental Preparation Let's check in with everybody's heads first and see where they're at. Art and JJ, after two first-place finishes, are glad to be friends and coworkers, not bogged down by romantic entanglements.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 8, 1992
Agassi for Veep! Some husband Mitterrand is, wallowing in the pleasures of Munich while Mme. M. is dodging bombs in Kurdistan. If those mad Serbs don't watch out, Europe will be forced to attack, which is the best chance Greater Serbia has to annex a bit of Bavaria.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
A sickout by Baltimore County teachers to protest mandatory furlough days left school administrators scrambling today to cover classes and ensure that instruction at the system's 148 schools continued normally.Teachers were upset at the fact that the furloughs were scheduled during days that the teachers would normally be working at school without the students, and they will now have to work those days without pay.The majority of absences appeared to be in high schools, said spokesman Richard E. Bavaria.
NEWS
By kate shatzkin and kate shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Today's question comes from a friend whose second-grader has been saying "I hate school." Over and over. What, if anything, should his parents do? I sent the question to Richard E. Bavaria, senior vice president for education outreach for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning. Before joining Sylvan, he was executive director of the department of curriculum and instruction for Baltimore County Public Schools. He has a blog, DrRickblog.com, with tips for parents and educators. Bavaria said not to panic - many kids go through a stage like this, especially right after the fun of summer.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Kayris asked how to go about researching kindergartens for her child. I consulted Richard E. Bavaria, senior vice president for education outreach for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning and author of DrRickblog.com, a blog for educators and parents. He offers an equation: "A squared + C squared = Good Choice. The As are 'Atmosphere' and 'Adults.' The Cs are 'Curriculum' and 'Children.' " * Atmosphere. Visit the school, Bavaria writes. "Are you greeted warmly? Do the children appear to be enjoying themselves and learning?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 11, 2010
Marie Isabelle Ewing, who witnessed the coming of World War II in Germany and later settled in Baltimore, died of a blood clot Jan. 3 at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. The former Homeland resident was 92. Born Marie Isabelle vom Rath in Berne, Switzerland, she was the daughter of an American mother and a German father, who was a lieutenant in the German army during World War I. As an infant, she lived through the war with her mother and grandparents in Frankfurt, Germany.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | February 16, 2009
Kayris asked how to go about researching kindergartens for her child. I consulted Richard E. Bavaria, senior vice president for education outreach for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning and author of DrRickblog.com, a blog for educators and parents. He offers an equation: "A squared + C squared = Good Choice. The As are 'Atmosphere' and 'Adults.' The Cs are 'Curriculum' and 'Children.' " * Atmosphere. Visit the school, Bavaria writes. "Are you greeted warmly? Do the children appear to be enjoying themselves and learning?
NEWS
By kate shatzkin and kate shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Today's question comes from a friend whose second-grader has been saying "I hate school." Over and over. What, if anything, should his parents do? I sent the question to Richard E. Bavaria, senior vice president for education outreach for Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning. Before joining Sylvan, he was executive director of the department of curriculum and instruction for Baltimore County Public Schools. He has a blog, DrRickblog.com, with tips for parents and educators. Bavaria said not to panic - many kids go through a stage like this, especially right after the fun of summer.
FEATURES
By Pat Hanna Kuehl and Pat Hanna Kuehl,Special to The Sun | October 9, 1994
It's cold, damp and gets dark early -- but those who've been there know the best time to visit Bavaria is during the four weeks before Christmas, when practically every city and hamlet has its own version of a yuletide market.The smell of sizzling sausage and simmering spiced wine permeates the air, flickering candles reflect in every window, and strains of traditional German carols echo through medieval passages. Pedestrians in heavy coats, collars turned up to fend off icy blasts, hurry along narrow, cobblestone streets toward the town square, where long rows of wood stalls with striped-awning rooftops offer a wild variety of merchandise.
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 26, 1993
My wife and I weren't wearing lederhosen and boots when we drove into the mountain town of Helen, Ga., but maybe we should have been.After all, Helen looks more like it belongs in Germany's alpine region than in northeast Georgia.Just about every building here resembles an alpine chalet, with steep red terra cotta roofs, walls decorated with painted alpine scenes and flowered window boxes. The shops have names like House of Tyrol and sell such things as cuckoo clocks and beer steins. Restaurants offer sauerbraten, schinken (ham)
NEWS
By Michael Kernan | January 22, 1993
A FRIEND of mine who runs a major art gallery in New York said the other day he'd heard there was this amazing restaurant in Baltimore that had paintings all over the walls.Well, that was easy. It was Haussner's, of course. More than a restaurant, the pride of Eastern Avenue has been a local landmark ever since the late William Henry Haussner -- a newcomer from Bavaria -- founded it 67 years ago. He married another immigrant from Germany, Frances Wilke, in 1935, and Mrs. Haussner, now 83, still drops in at the place every week.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 8, 1992
Agassi for Veep! Some husband Mitterrand is, wallowing in the pleasures of Munich while Mme. M. is dodging bombs in Kurdistan. If those mad Serbs don't watch out, Europe will be forced to attack, which is the best chance Greater Serbia has to annex a bit of Bavaria.
NEWS
By Michael Kernan | January 22, 1993
A FRIEND of mine who runs a major art gallery in New York said the other day he'd heard there was this amazing restaurant in Baltimore that had paintings all over the walls.Well, that was easy. It was Haussner's, of course. More than a restaurant, the pride of Eastern Avenue has been a local landmark ever since the late William Henry Haussner -- a newcomer from Bavaria -- founded it 67 years ago. He married another immigrant from Germany, Frances Wilke, in 1935, and Mrs. Haussner, now 83, still drops in at the place every week.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | March 17, 1992
A sickout by Baltimore County teachers to protest mandatory furlough days left school administrators scrambling today to cover classes and ensure that instruction at the system's 148 schools continued normally.Teachers were upset at the fact that the furloughs were scheduled during days that the teachers would normally be working at school without the students, and they will now have to work those days without pay.The majority of absences appeared to be in high schools, said spokesman Richard E. Bavaria.
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