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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 606ll | May 22, 1991
Q. Recently, my broker recommended Bausch & Lomb as a good stock. What's the near- and long-term outlook.?A. All the necessary positives are in focus.Buy shares of Bausch & Lomb (around $88 a share, New York Stock Exchange), the vision care and instruments firm, because they are still trading at a discount despite the company's strong 15 percent annual growth rate, said Ruth Alon, analyst with Kidder Peabody & Co.Among its products are Soflens contact lenses, ReNu lens solutions, Ray-Ban sunglassess, telescopes and binoculars.
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SPORTS
April 9, 2007
AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. -- Tatiana Golovin beat Nadia Petrova, 6-2, 6-1, yesterday for her first WTA Tour singles title at the Bausch & Lomb Championships at the Amelia Island Plantation. Golovin was appearing in her fourth championship match but had been runner-up in each of the three previous finals. This time, there was no denying the French teenager. Golovin answered nearly all of top-seeded Petrova's booming but erratic serves and most of her blistering ground strokes. But her best tactic was to wait until the defending champion made one of her 27 unforced errors.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 606ll | May 22, 1991
Q. Recently, my broker recommendedd Bausch & Lomb as a good stock. What's the near- and long-term outlook?A. All the necessary positives are in focus.Buy shares of Bausch & Lomb (around $88 a share, New York Stock Exchange), the vision care and instruments firm, because they are still trading at a discount despite the company's strong 15 percent annual growth rate, said Ruth Alon, analyst with Kidder Peabody & Co.Among its products are Soflens contact lenses, ReNu lens solutions, Ray-Ban sunglasses, telescopes and binoculars.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Wearing a dark suit and standing before a nondescript backdrop, Bausch & Lomb chief executive Ronald Zarrella looks into the camera and soberly lays it on the line. "The health and safety of your eyes has always been our first priority. That's why we've stopped selling one of our ReNu contact lens solutions: MoistureLoc," Zarrella says, speaking slowly and deliberately during the commercial, which recently began airing nationwide. "Despite exhaustive testing, we're unable to eliminate the possibility of a link to a rare eye infection."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sunglass Assn. of AmericaSUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
Bausch & Lomb Inc.'s Garrett County factory is the kind that Maryland likes to brag about.The sunglass-lens plant pays production workers $9 an hour and more. It wins national quality awards. Modern, clean, technologically complex, it supports the idea that this state's smart, more-expensive work force is still valued by manufacturers.Two weeks ago Bausch & Lomb announced that it will close the Oakland plant, Garrett's biggest employer. The town, its mayor said, is "in disbelief." Six hundred jobs will evaporate to Texas and overseas.
NEWS
January 13, 1996
IT WAS A STUNNING BLOW to folks in Garrett County, Maryland's western-most subdivision. Bausch & Lomb, the area's largest employer, announced it was shutting its 25-year-old plant in Oakland by the end of the year. That means a loss of 600 good-paying jobs in a town of only 1,700 residents. The company's contribution to the local economy nearly equals the entire county budget.Oakland's mayor said he was in "disbelief." There was no advance warning, no time for a counter-offer. Bausch and Lomb is struggling.
BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang and Eleanor Yang,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Bausch & Lomb has agreed to pay $1.7 million, or $100,000 each to 17 states' attorneys general, including Maryland, to settle investigations of its labeling practices on contact lenses.The Rochester, N.Y.-based eyewear giant said in a statement that it is "innocent of any wrongdoing" and said it settled with the states' consumer protection offices "to avoid spending valuable time and resources establishing the merits of product labeling that was eliminated years ago."The attorneys general had been investigating Bausch & Lomb's marketing of one set of lenses under three different names between September 1994 and late 1995.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Bausch & Lomb Inc. paid the price yesterday for closing its Garrett County plant, setting aside millions to pay severance to laid-off workers and booking a $3.37 million loss in the fourth quarter, partly as a result of the planned shutdown.Bausch & Lomb will spend $17.4 million, after taxes, to finance layoffs and offset the loss it will take on selling one of its corporate planes, said spokeswoman Holly Echols.The company is closing a sunglass lens plant in Oakland and eliminating about 600 jobs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Bausch & Lomb Inc., the third-biggest maker of contact lenses, paid Chief Executive Officer Ronald L. Zarrella $10.1 million last year. Zarrella also received stock options valued as much as $30 million and more than $5 million in restricted stock that will vest by 2006, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday. Zarrella's base salary was $1.1 million, according to the filing. The company withheld Zarrella's $1.1 million bonus last year after he admitted that his resume listed false information about his education.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Bausch & Lomb Inc., which in January rocked Garrett County by announcing plans to shut its sunglass lens factory there and lay off 600, intends to find a buyer for the facility by the end of the year.The Rochester, N.Y.-based company is hoping its $2.85 million asking price -- a fraction of its investment in the 25-year-old plant -- will attract numerous companies interested in rehiring Bausch & Lomb employees."It is certainly our hope that at least some of our work force will be hired by the buyer," said Barbara M. Kelley, a Bausch & Lomb spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 2003
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Bausch & Lomb Inc., the third-biggest maker of contact lenses, paid Chief Executive Officer Ronald L. Zarrella $10.1 million last year. Zarrella also received stock options valued as much as $30 million and more than $5 million in restricted stock that will vest by 2006, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday. Zarrella's base salary was $1.1 million, according to the filing. The company withheld Zarrella's $1.1 million bonus last year after he admitted that his resume listed false information about his education.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 20, 2001
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Bausch & Lomb Inc. said yesterday that its second-quarter profit dropped more than 80 percent because of slowing demand for lens-care products and lenses. Net income fell to $6.8 million, or 13 cents a share, from profit from operations of $40 million, or 74 cents, a year earlier. Sales fell 9.1 percent to $414 million from $455.2 million. In the second quarter a year ago, the company took charges of about $5.4 million, or 10 cents per share, to cover costs of its attempted buyout of Wesley Jessen VisionCare Inc. and the settlement of a lawsuit.
BUSINESS
By BRIDGE NEWS | March 24, 2000
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Bausch & Lomb Inc., the No. 1 contact lens maker, said yesterday that it made an unsolicited offer of $600 million in cash to acquire Wesley Jessen VisionCare Inc., a specialty lens manufacturer. The offer comes three days after Wesley proposed buying Ocular Sciences Inc., one of Bausch's biggest rivals, for $413 million. That deal would create the second-largest soft contact lens maker in the world. The offer by Rochester, N.Y.-based Bausch of $34 a share represents a premium of 37 percent over Wesley Jessen's closing price Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | July 5, 1998
They go by many names: hair springs, accordion headbands, zigzag bands.But whatever you call them, these teethy gizmos are hot. Their appeal is part practical: They don't slide out like ordinary headbands, and they keep hair off your face. Yet they pack plenty of style: They're sleek, chic and come with pearls, crystal beads or velvet, among other things.They first appeared 15 years ago and resurfaced on European runways last fall. This summer, they've been particularly popular with teens and young adults.
BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang and Eleanor Yang,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Bausch & Lomb has agreed to pay $1.7 million, or $100,000 each to 17 states' attorneys general, including Maryland, to settle investigations of its labeling practices on contact lenses.The Rochester, N.Y.-based eyewear giant said in a statement that it is "innocent of any wrongdoing" and said it settled with the states' consumer protection offices "to avoid spending valuable time and resources establishing the merits of product labeling that was eliminated years ago."The attorneys general had been investigating Bausch & Lomb's marketing of one set of lenses under three different names between September 1994 and late 1995.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1997
MOUNTAIN LAKE PARK -- In a remote, rural county where jobs are prized like rich veins of coal extricated from mountains of rock, this afternoon brings as painful an event as one can imagine.Without fanfare, day shift workers at the sprawling Bausch & Lomb Inc. manufacturing plant east of Oakland will grind and polish their last Ray-Ban sunglass lense. A 26-year-old facility that employed 600 last year will go silent.For 30,000 Garrett County residents who have known this day would come since company officials announced the closing 15 months ago, reality hits home.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
OAKLAND -- At St. Peter's Church, a tiny Gothic gem tucked on a side street amid wood-frame houses in the mountains of this Western Maryland hamlet, the Rev. Richard Spencer studied the pain on the faces of his parishioners. "The mountains," he began, quoting the Psalms, "shall yield peace for all people, and the hills, justice."But peace and justice seem elusive now, Father Spencer acknowledged in a Sunday morning homily that took on the tones of an eloquent eulogy. Just five days before, Bausch & Lomb Inc., Garrett County's biggest private employer, had stunned the mountain people when it announced it would be closing its sprawling sunglass lens plant, eliminating 600 jobs in phases as it shifts operations to San Antonio this year.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
Five companies with operations in Maryland received awards yesterday at a conference sponsored by the Maryland Center for Quality & Productivity and the American Society for Quality Control.The companies that received the awards were Bausch & Lomb Eyeware Division in Oakland, IBM Corp. -- Federal Systems Co. in Gaithersburg, Maryland Plastics Inc. of Federalsburg, Perdue Edible Oil Refinery in Salisbury and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. of Seabrook.The Bausch & Lomb division, received the Senate Productivity Award for Manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Bausch & Lomb Inc., which in January rocked Garrett County by announcing plans to shut its sunglass lens factory there and lay off 600, intends to find a buyer for the facility by the end of the year.The Rochester, N.Y.-based company is hoping its $2.85 million asking price -- a fraction of its investment in the 25-year-old plant -- will attract numerous companies interested in rehiring Bausch & Lomb employees."It is certainly our hope that at least some of our work force will be hired by the buyer," said Barbara M. Kelley, a Bausch & Lomb spokeswoman.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 8, 1996
Because he regards all straight employment as human catastrophe, Eddie from South Baltimore, the semi-well-known bookmaker, is making his way along Hanover Street this frosty morning with four imitation wool sweaters in a plastic bag."Worth $89," he explains by way of sales pitch."Too much," says a guy regarding them with the eye of a connoisseur."I'll take $20," says Eddie, never one to split hairs.Historically, Eddie makes his living booking horse races and ballgames and numbers. But, owing to the football season having ceased and the state having become the biggest lottery operator around, it's fallen to Eddie to supplement his income in a variety of other ways.
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