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NEWS
April 10, 1993
When a newspaperman lives on into his ninth decade, old clippings yellow, dust settles on microfilm and the great events and people of yesteryear fade into fleeting memory. Such was the fate of Ernie Baugh, for 56 years a reporter and editorial writer for this newspaper. If he had not died this week, he would still be around to tell us he had had a pretty good life.Those clippings and microfilm, after all, are a touch of immortality bestowed on only a comparatively few mortals. Who knows what researcher in what year will chance across Mr. Baugh's work as he writes the definitive history of Baltimore's one-sixth political bosses or hi-jinks at the General Assembly?
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NEWS
September 5, 2010
ARLINGTON, Texas — Andy Dalton threw for a touchdown and ran for two more, including the go-ahead score in the third quarter, as sixth-ranked TCU downed No.24 Oregon State 30-21 on Saturday night at Cowboys Stadium. Dalton went 17-for-27 with 175 yards and two interceptions and had 15 carries for 64 yards for the Horned Frogs, who went 12-0 in the regular season last year but lost to Boise State in the Fiesta Bowl. Dalton threw three interceptions in that game after throwing only five in the regular season.
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SPORTS
August 9, 1991
STRATTON MOUNTAIN, Vt. -- Laura Baugh, seeking her first victory in 17 years on the LPGA tour before she leaves to have her fourth child, tied for the first-round lead yesterday in the $450,000 Stratton Mountain Classic.Baugh and last week's winner, Deb Richard, matched strokes in the same threesome for 4-under-par 68s, and Rosie Jones came in moments later with the same score.All three thought they could have done better under the sun on the 6,219-yard course that played much tougher in the rain last year.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2006
For football fans, the most compelling moment is the long pass as it's launched from the quarterback's hand, glides in a suspense-building parabola and descends in a dramatic denouement. How many NFL Films productions feature a spiraling football in slow-motion, framed by a sparkling blue sky, then plucked from the air by outstretched hands? It's a can't-miss crowd-pleaser. In the history of pro football, no single element has done more to change the game's competitive complexion - and just as importantly, drive its commercial appeal - than the development of the passing game.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
IT'S 9:30 P.M. WHEN he ends a long day of meetings. A foggy, winter drizzle envelops Annapolis as Don Baugh ducks into an alley behind the Chesapeake Bay Foundation headquarters, shucking coat and tie, tugging on neoprene boots, mitts and full dry suit for the commute home. I'd offer a ride, but Baugh, vice president for education at the 90,000-member foundation, practices what he preaches, including less driving, which translates to less bay pollution. So he paddles, six miles to work and back, in dark and rain, in ice, in 30 knot winds, down the Severn, around the Naval Academy, into City Dock, where his red kayak jostles for space with the dinghies of pleasure craft.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | December 6, 1994
LAST MONTH'S ELECTIONS, as usual, left some poll takers and pundits with egg on their faces.Some races, which had been labeled too close to call, produced winners who easily glided to victory. In others, some underdogs pulled off upsets.All of this brings to mind Baltimore's first TV election coverage team -- WMAR-TV's (Channel 2) Ernest "Ernie" Baugh, David "Dave" Stickle and Richard "Moco" Yardley and what they called their "100 prompt, predictable precincts."When The Baltimore Sun began operating WMAR it naturally selected many of its first staff people from among the newspaper's employees.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | November 27, 1990
IT IS 7:00 p.m. election night, Sept. 18, 1950, and you are watching WMAR (Channel 2) -- the only Baltimore TV station carrying election returns. (You could have tuned in to Charles Roeder on WCBM, the only radio station in those days that could be said to be "doing election returns.") On the TV set, seated at table on camera in a studio in The Sun building at Charles and Baltimore were David ("Dave") Stickle, Ernest ("Ernie") Baugh and Richard ("Moco") Yardley. Stickle was a Sun reporter who went to TV reporting (he was Baltimore's first TV reporter)
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | March 26, 2006
Even as spring begins, and would-be paddlers look longingly at the water, the kayaking community urges most of them to stay at home. "We try to pull in the reins a bit," said Dave Young, a manager at Spring River Corp., a paddling store in Eastport. "The water temperature is still pretty low." The problem, Young said, is that less-experienced kayakers are more likely to tip and therefore take a frigid - and possibly deadly - bath in the Chesapeake Bay. He says that beginners should really start in May when the temperature of the water catches up to that of the air. Winter kayakers wear dry suits, which are essentially reinforced, well-tailored plastic bags.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
As Don Baugh prepares for his morning commute, he doesn't listen to the radio traffic report. He checks the tide, the wind. Then he pulls on his wet suit.And sometimes he wonders: why don't more people go to work by kayak?"I'm amazed more people don't do it," says Mr. Baugh, who works at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in downtown Annapolis. "It's so easy."For about two years now, on a somewhat regular basis, Mr. Baugh has been making the 3 1/2 -mile trip down the Severn River to City Dock in Annapolis in a 17-foot fiberglass replica of an Eskimo kayak.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
SOON, newcomers to the Washington-Baltimore Consolidated Statistical Area will no longer comprehend the term Baltimore & Ohio; it will have to be explained to them that, years ago, a mighty railroad had its headquarters here. Things get lost, in time's onrush; another being the mention, in newspaper obituaries, of who so-and-so's parents were.Today the formula allows space to descendants only, and readers go away ignorant, for instance, as to whether a defunct's career was on his or her own mettle, or came about from having been the boss's child or in-law.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | March 26, 2006
Even as spring begins, and would-be paddlers look longingly at the water, the kayaking community urges most of them to stay at home. "We try to pull in the reins a bit," said Dave Young, a manager at Spring River Corp., a paddling store in Eastport. "The water temperature is still pretty low." The problem, Young said, is that less-experienced kayakers are more likely to tip and therefore take a frigid - and possibly deadly - bath in the Chesapeake Bay. He says that beginners should really start in May when the temperature of the water catches up to that of the air. Winter kayakers wear dry suits, which are essentially reinforced, well-tailored plastic bags.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2003
Two PGA Tour veterans, an outstanding club professional and a South African celebrating his 50th birthday claimed the four available places in qualifying yesterday at Mountain Branch Golf Club for the Champions Tour's Constellation Energy Classic. Lon Nielsen, from East Aurora, N.Y., whose 20-year career as head professional at Crag Burn GC includes three national PGA of America Club Professional of the Year awards, closed with successive birdies on Nos. 7-9 to lead the way in the 67-man field with a 4-under-par 33-35-68.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
WHEN THE FINAL rounds of the 2002 Joseph S. Rumbaugh Historical Oration Contest were over on the Fourth of July, Severna Park resident Greg Price was named top teen-age orator in the nation and winner of the $3,000 grand prize. The 18-year old Severn School graduate can teach us all a thing or two about how to celebrate Independence Day. Not only did he out-talk five other talented finalists in the annual contest sponsored by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, but he came away from the patriotic competition with an increased appreciation of our nation's founding fathers, sons and brothers.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
IT'S 9:30 P.M. WHEN he ends a long day of meetings. A foggy, winter drizzle envelops Annapolis as Don Baugh ducks into an alley behind the Chesapeake Bay Foundation headquarters, shucking coat and tie, tugging on neoprene boots, mitts and full dry suit for the commute home. I'd offer a ride, but Baugh, vice president for education at the 90,000-member foundation, practices what he preaches, including less driving, which translates to less bay pollution. So he paddles, six miles to work and back, in dark and rain, in ice, in 30 knot winds, down the Severn, around the Naval Academy, into City Dock, where his red kayak jostles for space with the dinghies of pleasure craft.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
CareFirst BlueCross Blue- Shield will begin offering a discount plan for alternative therapies to members next year that will not require them to get referrals from primary care doctors, the company said yesterday.Starting Jan. 1, members of FreeState Health Plan, CapitalCare HMO, Delmarva Health Plan, and the Preferred Health Network will receive 25 percent discounts on acupuncture, massage therapy and chiropractic services from a group of more than 400 practitioners, said Dr. Eric R. Baugh, senior vice president for medical affairs and network management.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
LANDOVER -- Washington Redskins cornerback Darrell Green added another mark of longevity, but he will be keeping memories of yesterday's 41-35 overtime loss to the Dallas Cowboys short. Green entered his club-record 17th season, surpassing the 16 seasons each played by Hall of Famer Sammy Baugh and former linebacker Monte Coleman. He probably should have realized how the day would end, however, after yesterday's program had him on the cover with his name misspelled as "Darryl."
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1999
CareFirst BlueCross Blue- Shield will begin offering a discount plan for alternative therapies to members next year that will not require them to get referrals from primary care doctors, the company said yesterday.Starting Jan. 1, members of FreeState Health Plan, CapitalCare HMO, Delmarva Health Plan, and the Preferred Health Network will receive 25 percent discounts on acupuncture, massage therapy and chiropractic services from a group of more than 400 practitioners, said Dr. Eric R. Baugh, senior vice president for medical affairs and network management.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
WHEN THE FINAL rounds of the 2002 Joseph S. Rumbaugh Historical Oration Contest were over on the Fourth of July, Severna Park resident Greg Price was named top teen-age orator in the nation and winner of the $3,000 grand prize. The 18-year old Severn School graduate can teach us all a thing or two about how to celebrate Independence Day. Not only did he out-talk five other talented finalists in the annual contest sponsored by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, but he came away from the patriotic competition with an increased appreciation of our nation's founding fathers, sons and brothers.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | December 6, 1994
LAST MONTH'S ELECTIONS, as usual, left some poll takers and pundits with egg on their faces.Some races, which had been labeled too close to call, produced winners who easily glided to victory. In others, some underdogs pulled off upsets.All of this brings to mind Baltimore's first TV election coverage team -- WMAR-TV's (Channel 2) Ernest "Ernie" Baugh, David "Dave" Stickle and Richard "Moco" Yardley and what they called their "100 prompt, predictable precincts."When The Baltimore Sun began operating WMAR it naturally selected many of its first staff people from among the newspaper's employees.
NEWS
April 14, 1993
SOON, newcomers to the Washington-Baltimore Consolidated Statistical Area will no longer comprehend the term Baltimore & Ohio; it will have to be explained to them that, years ago, a mighty railroad had its headquarters here. Things get lost, in time's onrush; another being the mention, in newspaper obituaries, of who so-and-so's parents were.Today the formula allows space to descendants only, and readers go away ignorant, for instance, as to whether a defunct's career was on his or her own mettle, or came about from having been the boss's child or in-law.
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