Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBatts
IN THE NEWS

Batts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 21, 2008
On may 17, 2008, JASON PRIDGEN BATTS; beloved son of Johnnie and Debra Batts. On Thursday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Baltimore National Pike from 3-8 P.M. On Friday, Mr. Batts will lie in state at Celebration Church, 6401 Foreland Garth, where the family will receive friends from 10-11 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner outlined Tuesday a sweeping plan to reduce police brutality, including the possibility of equipping officers with body cameras, while reiterating that they are committed to restoring public trust in the agency. "We didn't create these problems, but as leadership in charge today, it's our obligation to do everything that we can to fix the breach between the community and police," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said about the 41-page report outlining their plans.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts sailed through a confirmation hearing on Wednesday, with City Council members and residents praising his accessibility and moves toward reform. At this time last year, Batts faced questions from city leaders about his leadership amid a surge in shootings as his strategic plan remained in the works. Now, with violent and property crime down and a series of initiatives launched to address community concerns and improve police procedures, council members encouraged Batts to keep moving the department forward.
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Anthony W. Batts was officially sworn in Thursday as Baltimore's 37th police commissioner, pledging to build trust with the community while continuing to reduce violent crime. Batts, who spent three decades with departments in California, has been guiding the city police force since his arrival in late September following the retirement of agency veteran Frederick H. Bealefeld III. The city's homicide numbers are on track to rise compared to last year, when Baltimore saw fewer than 200 killings for the first time since the 1970s, but overall gun violence continues to trend downward.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
I was greatly disappointed by Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts' response to the tragedy at Good Samaritan Hospital ( "After teen's death, police restrict response to hospital emergencies," May 21). I had hoped that we had turned a new page in the leadership of the Baltimore police, but perhaps I am mistaken. The hospital staff did not Tase the patient; a Baltimore City police officer did. If the police do not know how to assist hospitals with dangerous patients then additional training is needed.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
For Raymond Kelly, fixing the issue of crime in his Sandtown Winchester neighborhood seems simple enough - make sure police and community leaders are visible. "Drug dealers on the corner don't want to be seen," the community organizer said. "We want to be seen. " Kelly and his wife, Melissa, have run "No Boundaries," a seven-neighborhood community improvement coalition, for about six years. On Wednesday night, Kelly petitioned Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts to join them at their monthly meeting and discuss how police could help their cause.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
With murders, non-fatal shootings and street robberies up in 2013, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts emphasized in television interviews Monday that crime affecting "everyday citizens" was moving in the right direction.  "It's not throughout the city as a whole," Batts told WBAL-TV of the violence. "It's very localized and unfortunately, it's with African American men who are involved in the drug trade and 80 to 85 percent of the victims are involved in the drug trade going back and forth.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Baltimore's state senators pressed police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts on Thursday to address city residents' fears in the aftermath of the spate of killings that started the year. Batts tried to assure them that he was "just as upset as you are" and that "we're going to respond. " During the meeting in Annapolis with the city's six senators, all Democrats, Batts said he has been reorganizing the Police Department since his arrival in 2012 and that, with the exception of homicides and auto thefts, crime is significantly lower overall in the city than it has been historically.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
At a recent news conference, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts pledged that his department would responsibly use the controversial tactic known until recently as "stop and frisk. " As an example to the public and his officers, he described making such a stop himself. But experts say Batts' example — he said at the time that he searched somebody based on a tip that the person was a hit man for the Black Guerrilla Family gang — may not meet the standards for such stops.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts was confirmed Monday by the City Council for a full six-year term. Batts has led the city's police force since October 2012, when he was selected to fill the unexpired term of the previous commissioner, Frederick H. Bealefeld III. His appointment was confirmed unanimously on a voice vote without discussion. He will receive a salary of $201,700, reflecting an $8,000 raise. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said Batts has made "some improvements" and that he was especially pleased with the commissioner's efforts to put more police in neighborhoods.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts sailed through a confirmation hearing on Wednesday, with City Council members and residents praising his accessibility and moves toward reform. At this time last year, Batts faced questions from city leaders about his leadership amid a surge in shootings as his strategic plan remained in the works. Now, with violent and property crime down and a series of initiatives launched to address community concerns and improve police procedures, council members encouraged Batts to keep moving the department forward.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
As communities across Baltimore gathered Saturday for events designed to address the violence troubling the city, mayhem occurred once more. In a chaotic chain of events, the city's police commissioner came across a shooting in a Northeast neighborhood, prompting a police response that led to an accident and left several people injured. About 50 people turned out in midafternoon for a three-mile walk of the Sinclair Lane neighborhood to celebrate the beginning of the school year and to provide positive role models in the hope that children will steer away from violence.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts set an example for his fellow officers when he met recently with Baltimore's transgender community to discuss the murder of a 26-year-old transgender woman whose body was found in a Northwest Baltimore alley last week. The death of Mia Henderson on Wednesday, and the slaying last month of Kandy Hall, another transgender woman, sent shock waves through the LGBT community that have left many members fearful of being targeted by violence, yet reluctant to turn to police for help.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Four investigators from agencies outside Baltimore are working to determine who left a dead rat on the car windshield of an officer who was cooperating with prosecutors on a police brutality case. "We're going to go wherever that information takes us," Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts told a City Council committee last week. But an attorney for the whistle-blower officer, Detective Joseph Crystal, believes the efforts are "way too little, way too late" and said the investigation has taken so long that any officers implicated could not be disciplined because the statute of limitations has run out. In a rare move, the investigators working the case were pulled from outside of the city, according to Crystal's attorney, Nick Panteleakis.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Without knowing all the facts, it's impossible to say whether police officers acted responsibly in the events leading up to the death of 19-year-old George V. King, who was reportedly struck repeatedly with a Taser by an officer seeking to help staff and security at Good Samaritan Hospital subdue him. Was it appropriate for police to get involved in the first place? Was their use of force justifiable? We don't know, and Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is right to ask the public to reserve judgment.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts claimed Thursday that the agency's decision to stop notifying citizens of reported shootings over Twitter was never official policy and he would have vetoed it if it had been brought to him.  Speaking at an LGBT forum, The Sun's Kevin Rector reports that Batts said the idea came from someone "lower down in the organization" who was concerned, like he is, about incorrect information going out over...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
When Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts appeared at a recent town hall, a woman stood to ask about police brutality, a touchy topic for both residents and officers. She said she worried for her young nephew, who was frequently stopped by police. Batts' 10-minute answer ranged from the personal to the practical. He talked about his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, drawing laughs about the fried bologna sandwiches his family ate to survive. He explained why people must sit cross-legged on curbs for officer safety, but understood police interactions can be demeaning for those detained.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Baltimore's nearly $2.2 million proposal to reduce violent crime received preliminary approval from the City Council Monday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. The proposal would support Operation CeaseFire, a program aimed at reducing recidivism rates among violent offenders; and a youth center to hold minors who break curfew; and includes $1.2 million in city gambling revenue for overtime and staffing in high-crime areas. As the mayor stressed the need for the supplemental funding at a Monday evening news conference at City Hall, she said less than 1 percent of Western District residents committed more than 60 percent of the killings and more than 70 percent of the nonfatal shootings in that area.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.