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Battleship

NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1998
One hundred years ago tonight, 40 minutes after the last notes of 9 o'clock taps had faded softly into the dusk of a tropical evening, the USS Maine blew up at its mooring in Havana harbor.As the devastating explosion twisted and crushed the small battleship, 260 of the 360-man crew were killed instantly; another seven died soon after.The destruction of this proud product of the new Navy then a-building put the United States on course to a war with Spain that was officially declared two months and 10 days later.
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TRAVEL
By Zeke Wigglesworth and Zeke Wigglesworth,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 14, 1999
HONOLULU -- The USS Arizona -- sitting solitary, silent and hallowed on Battleship Row for almost 60 years -- is not alone any more.The battered ship, resting on the bottom of Pearl Harbor, has become a national symbol, the sunken memorial to the Americans who died during the Japanese attack on Oahu and Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. It is the most sacred U.S. Navy monument on Earth, the final grave for the 1,177 sailors and Marines who perished aboard during the attack.Now, anchored near the Arizona is the USS Missouri, the second most-famous battleship of World War II, official designation BB-63.
NEWS
By Terry Bitman and Terry Bitman,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 18, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- Finally, their ship has come in. After nearly a day of tumultuous cheering by thousands of onlookers, stirring multigun salutes, enthusiastic flag-waving, and the poignant recalling of indelible wartime memories, the USS New Jersey has returned to its place of birth.The battle-scarred hero of three wars arrived last week at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where the 857-foot battleship was built nearly 57 years ago. and began the not-so-easy task of backing into its docking space.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
On a spring day in 1878, a young Naval Academy physics instructor took his students from the confines of the lecture hall and assembled them along the banks of the Severn River. He began to set up an experiment for measuring the speed of light.But what Albert A. Michelson, then 26, achieved was nothing short of revolutionary. He set a measurement that would stand for 45 years and began work that would lead to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.Michelson, who had graduated from the academy only five years earlier, set up a revolving mirror at one end of the sea wall and a stationary mirror 500 feet away, along with a heliostat, a lens and a tuning fork.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
At dawn over Guadalcanal 50 years ago, two Japanese dive bombers plunged toward the cruiser USS Helena and ran smack into the future of warfare.Until that January morning, ships without air cover were sitting ducks. Anti-aircraft fire was frustratingly inaccurate. With ammunition that exploded on impact, even the best gunners had to fire about 2,500 rounds on average to score a hit. Timed fuses that exploded a set number of seconds after firing worked a little better, but not much."Almost no one ever hit an airplane with the old-fashioned fuses," recalled Dr. James A. Van Allen, the discoverer of the Earth's radiation belt, who worked on fuses at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University during the war. "It would be just a sheer stroke of luck to hit anything."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 1998
Some people, upon hearing Paula Cole's luscious, melancholy hit "Where Have All the Cowboys Gone?," don't listen any further than the chorus.To their ears, the song is a longing look back to days when men were men and women were glad of it. Or, as the song's protagonist puts it, "I will raise the children/If you pay all the bills." Naturally, this leads them to believe that the 29-year-old Cole is herself an anti-feminist, the sort of woman who would happily do all the laundry if he pays all the bills.
NEWS
By NATHAN MILLER | December 1, 1991
Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton was a worrier. And as 1941 drew to a close, Layton, the U.S. Pacific Fleet's intelligence officer, had much to worry about.War with Japan appeared imminent, and on Dec. 1, the Japanese navy suddenly changed the radio call signs of its ships. This shift was ominous because the Communications Intelligence Unit at Pearl Harbor plotted the position of the Japanese fleet by intercepting these signals. Traffic analysts quickly identified the most commonly used new calls but were unable to locate a single Japanese aircraft carrier.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
A few years after shrapnel shattered his leg, Joe Taussig started begging his doctors to just take the thing off. Finally, they gave in. Taussig went back to work, keeping quiet about his missing limb."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1997
Nothing is more bully than war, "Rough Riders" would have us believe, and no man was ever more bully than Theodore Roosevelt. His mythic charge up Cuba's San Juan Hill is rousingly dramatized in TNT's four-hour miniseries, which, unfortunately, overstays its welcome by at least a third.This dream project for writer-director John Milius ("Red Dawn," "Conan the Barbarian"), for whom macho has provided a way of life and a paycheck, so oozes with testosterone that your TV screen may start sprouting facial hair.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 25, 2006
What sites do you recommend in and around Houston for a visit this summer? You have plenty of choices, starting with the Houston Museum District (houstonmuseumdistrict.org), just a short walk from downtown. You will find museums of fine arts, contemporary craft, natural science, photography, the Holocaust and others. Nearby is the Houston Zoo. Downtown's theater district has resident companies in ballet, opera, symphony and theater. The Alley Theatre (alleytheatre.org) performs through the summer.
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