Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBattleship
IN THE NEWS

Battleship

TRAVEL
By Zeke Wigglesworth and Zeke Wigglesworth,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 14, 1999
HONOLULU -- The USS Arizona -- sitting solitary, silent and hallowed on Battleship Row for almost 60 years -- is not alone any more.The battered ship, resting on the bottom of Pearl Harbor, has become a national symbol, the sunken memorial to the Americans who died during the Japanese attack on Oahu and Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. It is the most sacred U.S. Navy monument on Earth, the final grave for the 1,177 sailors and Marines who perished aboard during the attack.Now, anchored near the Arizona is the USS Missouri, the second most-famous battleship of World War II, official designation BB-63.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Terry Bitman and Terry Bitman,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 18, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- Finally, their ship has come in. After nearly a day of tumultuous cheering by thousands of onlookers, stirring multigun salutes, enthusiastic flag-waving, and the poignant recalling of indelible wartime memories, the USS New Jersey has returned to its place of birth.The battle-scarred hero of three wars arrived last week at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where the 857-foot battleship was built nearly 57 years ago. and began the not-so-easy task of backing into its docking space.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
On a spring day in 1878, a young Naval Academy physics instructor took his students from the confines of the lecture hall and assembled them along the banks of the Severn River. He began to set up an experiment for measuring the speed of light.But what Albert A. Michelson, then 26, achieved was nothing short of revolutionary. He set a measurement that would stand for 45 years and began work that would lead to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.Michelson, who had graduated from the academy only five years earlier, set up a revolving mirror at one end of the sea wall and a stationary mirror 500 feet away, along with a heliostat, a lens and a tuning fork.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
At dawn over Guadalcanal 50 years ago, two Japanese dive bombers plunged toward the cruiser USS Helena and ran smack into the future of warfare.Until that January morning, ships without air cover were sitting ducks. Anti-aircraft fire was frustratingly inaccurate. With ammunition that exploded on impact, even the best gunners had to fire about 2,500 rounds on average to score a hit. Timed fuses that exploded a set number of seconds after firing worked a little better, but not much."Almost no one ever hit an airplane with the old-fashioned fuses," recalled Dr. James A. Van Allen, the discoverer of the Earth's radiation belt, who worked on fuses at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University during the war. "It would be just a sheer stroke of luck to hit anything."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 19, 1994
Of course you can have the plumbing of your dreams. You can have a new whirlpool tub, and you can move the toilet over to accommodate it. You can drop a new porcelain sink into an antique dresser. You can trade a battered tub for a sleek new shower stall. You can switch the places of sink and toilet for better use of space, and you can add a bath in a former closet. You can have a new sink and dishwasher -- new faucets with a sprayer that works, a refrigerator with an icemaker.You can have just about any plumbing you want, no problem.
NEWS
By Clancy Sigal and Clancy Sigal,Los Angeles Times | May 27, 2007
Red Mutiny Eleven Fateful Days on the Battleship Potemkin By Neal Bascomb Houghton Mifflin / 386 pages / $26 Anyone who has seen Warren Beatty's 1981 film Reds, which dramatized the birth pangs of the Russian Revolution, may be moved by Red Mutiny, Neal Bascomb's elegiac and emotionally involving story of the revolution's dress rehearsal. It happened on a muggy June day in 1905, when 700 Russian sailors aboard the battleship Potemkin mutinied, throwing some of their officers into the Black Sea, and set up a free-speech soviet (council)
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN WOESTENDIEK and JOHN WOESTENDIEK,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
A cold wind whipped through Section 60. It stripped cherry blossoms from their branches, sending old buds and new to the muddy ground like spent confetti. It brought limp flags to life, masking the not-quite-silent background hum of funerals -- stifled sobs, cleared throats and hushed voices -- with the crisp and gently reassuring sound of fabric slapping itself. And it made Joe Rippetoe's pesky right shoulder so stiff that, when it was time to salute -- to face the general, accept the flag and hear the words, "On behalf of a grateful country ..."
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 25, 2006
What sites do you recommend in and around Houston for a visit this summer? You have plenty of choices, starting with the Houston Museum District (houstonmuseumdistrict.org), just a short walk from downtown. You will find museums of fine arts, contemporary craft, natural science, photography, the Holocaust and others. Nearby is the Houston Zoo. Downtown's theater district has resident companies in ballet, opera, symphony and theater. The Alley Theatre (alleytheatre.org) performs through the summer.
NEWS
April 23, 2002
Eugene Lewis Wolfe Jr., a manufacturers' representative and former owner of a Baltimore electrical components company, died of liver disease Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Timonium resident was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, Mr. Wolfe was a graduate of Kent School in Kent, Conn. During World War II, he served in the Navy as an engineer on the battleship USS Wisconsin. Recalled to active duty during the Korean conflict, he was an engineer on the battleship USS New Jersey.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
While hospitalized with a fractured ankle and broken jaw, John Bonkowski reached for his smartphone to find details about the man who beat him outside a parking garage near the Inner Harbor. He typed "Officer Michael McSpadden" into Google. The results stunned Bonkowski. He found references showing that the longtime Baltimore officer had been accused in three separate civil lawsuits: of kicking and stomping a woman, of breaking a man's wrist and of beating a man unconscious with a police baton.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.