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Battleship

TRAVEL
By Zeke Wigglesworth and Zeke Wigglesworth,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 14, 1999
HONOLULU -- The USS Arizona -- sitting solitary, silent and hallowed on Battleship Row for almost 60 years -- is not alone any more.The battered ship, resting on the bottom of Pearl Harbor, has become a national symbol, the sunken memorial to the Americans who died during the Japanese attack on Oahu and Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. It is the most sacred U.S. Navy monument on Earth, the final grave for the 1,177 sailors and Marines who perished aboard during the attack.Now, anchored near the Arizona is the USS Missouri, the second most-famous battleship of World War II, official designation BB-63.
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NEWS
By Terry Bitman and Terry Bitman,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 18, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- Finally, their ship has come in. After nearly a day of tumultuous cheering by thousands of onlookers, stirring multigun salutes, enthusiastic flag-waving, and the poignant recalling of indelible wartime memories, the USS New Jersey has returned to its place of birth.The battle-scarred hero of three wars arrived last week at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where the 857-foot battleship was built nearly 57 years ago. and began the not-so-easy task of backing into its docking space.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
At dawn over Guadalcanal 50 years ago, two Japanese dive bombers plunged toward the cruiser USS Helena and ran smack into the future of warfare.Until that January morning, ships without air cover were sitting ducks. Anti-aircraft fire was frustratingly inaccurate. With ammunition that exploded on impact, even the best gunners had to fire about 2,500 rounds on average to score a hit. Timed fuses that exploded a set number of seconds after firing worked a little better, but not much."Almost no one ever hit an airplane with the old-fashioned fuses," recalled Dr. James A. Van Allen, the discoverer of the Earth's radiation belt, who worked on fuses at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University during the war. "It would be just a sheer stroke of luck to hit anything."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 19, 1994
Of course you can have the plumbing of your dreams. You can have a new whirlpool tub, and you can move the toilet over to accommodate it. You can drop a new porcelain sink into an antique dresser. You can trade a battered tub for a sleek new shower stall. You can switch the places of sink and toilet for better use of space, and you can add a bath in a former closet. You can have a new sink and dishwasher -- new faucets with a sprayer that works, a refrigerator with an icemaker.You can have just about any plumbing you want, no problem.
TRAVEL
By Bo Smolka and Bo Smolka,Special to the Sun | June 15, 2003
As visitors enter the main gallery at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., idle chatter quickly dies to a reverent whisper. The light streaming in from upper-level windows casts an almost heavenly aura around the bronze plaques of the 254 baseball legends enshrined there. There is no stained glass or steeple, but make no mistake: To baseball fans, this is a sacred place, the resting place of the gods. Hundreds of Oriole fans are expected to make the pilgrimage to Cooperstown this summer as Eddie Murray joins this pantheon of baseball immortality July 27. (Oriole fans likely will return in droves again in 2007, the first year Cal Ripken is eligible for induction.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 25, 2006
What sites do you recommend in and around Houston for a visit this summer? You have plenty of choices, starting with the Houston Museum District (houstonmuseumdistrict.org), just a short walk from downtown. You will find museums of fine arts, contemporary craft, natural science, photography, the Holocaust and others. Nearby is the Houston Zoo. Downtown's theater district has resident companies in ballet, opera, symphony and theater. The Alley Theatre (alleytheatre.org) performs through the summer.
NEWS
April 23, 2002
Eugene Lewis Wolfe Jr., a manufacturers' representative and former owner of a Baltimore electrical components company, died of liver disease Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Timonium resident was 78. Born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, Mr. Wolfe was a graduate of Kent School in Kent, Conn. During World War II, he served in the Navy as an engineer on the battleship USS Wisconsin. Recalled to active duty during the Korean conflict, he was an engineer on the battleship USS New Jersey.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 9, 1991
STARKEY CORNER -- A half-century has passed, but the memories of that fateful Sunday morning still haunt Clyde Oney: the smoke and fire, the destruction and death that surrounded the USS Maryland at Pearl Harbor.To Mr. Oney, 68, it seems only yesterday he was a shy, gawky farm boy who took a hitch in the Navy to avoid the hardscrabble life in the hills of Magoffin County, Ky. In the intervening years, he wed and raised a family, worked three decades as a steel worker in Baltimore, and retired to his Eastern Shore farm.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
1931: Secret Service faux pas? Political egos have changed hardly a whit since 1931. Seventy-five years ago this month, President Herbert Hoover socially slighted the mayor of Annapolis, Walter E. Quenstedt. The White House later apologized, according to The Sun on Oct. 22, 1931. Hoover, in the midst of the Depression, was on his way to the Naval Academy to board the battleship Arkansas for the Battle of Yorktown sesquicentennial celebration. He failed to greet the mayor or even nod to him and his reception committee when he arrived by automobile in Annapolis.
NEWS
December 3, 2009
MAX EISEN, 91 Broadway press agent Max Eisen, a Broadway press agent from the days when feeding tidbits of gossip to columnists like Walter Winchell and staging stunts were standard practice for stirring up a bit more box-office appeal, died Nov. 23 of natural causes at his home in Manhattan. From his office above Sardi's on West 44th Street, Mr. Eisen worked the phone and clacked out news releases on his battleship-gray electric typewriter for more than four decades.
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