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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
Robert Cornelius Ballinger, who became a highly regarded expert on battleship propulsion systems in a uniformed and civilian naval career spanning five decades, died of heart failure Saturday at his Annapolis home. He was 81. "Known to his colleagues as `Battleship Bob,' Robert Ballinger probably knows more about battleship boilers than anyone else around," said a 1988 profile of Mr. Ballinger in a Navy publication. A native of Bowling Green, Ky., Mr. Ballinger was raised in Nashville, Tenn.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 29, 2012
In the third and final debate, Barack Obama scored huge points with the media, college kids and die-hard liberals -- in other words, his base -- when he mocked Mitt Romney's concern about our historically small Navy. "But I think Governor Romney maybe hasn't spent enough time looking at how our military works," the president said. "You -- you mentioned the Navy, for example, and that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. Well, Governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets because the nature of our military's changed.
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NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 5, 1998
WILTON, N.Y. -- Harolyn Lawton's 54 years as a Navy pinup girl began as a joke entry in a contest. But it won the hearts of the men aboard the USS New Jersey in World War II.The battleship held a contest for people to submit nominations to be the ship's official pinup. One entrant was Harolyn, who at the time was 5 months old."My grandmother heard about the contest. She sent it in just for a joke," said Lawton, now 54.The 74 other entrants to be the battleship's sweetheart were leggy young women.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
Charles E. "Bud" Wagner Sr., a retired Proctor & Gamble worker who served aboard the battleship USS Missouri during World War II, died May 3 of Alzheimer's disease at Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 84. Charles Edward Wagner Sr., the son of a pipe fitter and a housekeeper, was born at home in the 1500 block of Light Street. He attended city public schools until dropping out when he was 17. "He tried to enlist during World War II, but his mother refused to give her permission as he was only 17 years old," said his son, Charles E. Wagner Jr., of Lutherville.
FEATURES
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Robert Ruby is The Sun's Mideast correspondent | March 10, 1991
Life aboard the battleship USS Wisconsin usually is drill after numbing drill. Alarms sound. Sailors run up stairs to battle stations. After an hour the all-clear sounds.Then the war began.Five of us were aboard to watch as members of a Pentagon press pool. We observed the first wartime launch of cruise missiles, the shots that began the war, missiles that began their fight with a terrifying roar and a blinding ball of flame. Officers then assumed the shipboard drama was over and that the only excitement would come from more drills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 9, 1992
"The Battleship Potemkin" it's not, but Steven Seagal's "Under Siege" is a neatly milled piece of entertainment &r machinery, though inevitably violent. With Tropical Storm Seagal shooting and punching up a major massacre, it's "The Whackiest Ship in the Navy."I happen to prefer my bloodletting slightly more realistic, and "Under Siege" never bothers with realism -- or probability or common sense, for that matter. It's a "Die Hard" variant that features the lanky, dour Seagal as a renegade SEAL trapped on a battleship with 30 terrorists whom he must dispatch five and six at a time in order . . . well, in order for the movie to be over.
NEWS
By James Dao and James Dao,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 1, 1998
WASHINGTON - To devotees of naval history, America's great battleships are proud symbols of an era when hulking vessels could unnerve the most belligerent of enemies simply by bellying up to their coastlines, when global power was won at sea and diplomacy rested on the shoulders of admirals.Those times may be gone, but the aura of power that still surrounds the huge Iowa-class battleships that helped win the Pacific war 50 years ago has placed them at the center of a new conflict: a nationwide competition among states that see the ships as potential gold mines for tourist dollars.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
Baltimoreans were shaken from the doldrums of a late autumn Sunday afternoon when on Dec. 7, 1941, the voice of NBC broadcaster Ben Grauer broke into the theme song of Sammy Kaye's "Sunday Serenade" with the first bulletin announcing the attack on Pearl Harbor.The Sunday Sun raced an extra edition onto the streets, and newsboys fanned out through the city shouting the ominous headlines: "JAPS DECLARE WAR ON U.S.; Honolulu, Manila Bombed; NAVAL BATTLE OFF HAWAII."Front-page stories only hinted at the devastation caused by the early morning surprise attack.
NEWS
By Joseph A. Gambardello and Joseph A. Gambardello,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 19, 2001
CAMDEN, N.J. - The countdown continues. For teams of ironworkers, bricklayers, pile drivers, painters, air-conditioning technicians, pipe fitters, divers, and plain old volunteers, not much time remains to get the USS New Jersey ready if it is to open to the public sometime after Labor Day. The work moved into high gear in recent weeks with the awarding of $5.4 million in contracts. Nearly half the money came from the Delaware River Port Authority as an advance on expected state funding.
TRAVEL
By JERRY V. HAINES and JERRY V. HAINES,Special to the Sun | July 20, 2003
With all the attention given lately to the "embedded" press, many people might want to take their own try at living as the military does. I decided to start gradually -- with World War II. The USS New Jersey, the nation's largest battleship, was launched at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on Dec. 7, 1942, a year to the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The end of World War II might have been the end of the New Jersey, as new forms of warfare obviated the classic ship vs. ship mission of battleships.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | March 16, 2008
As American forces began landing on Okinawa in the spring of 1945, the Japanese battleship Yamato steamed away from its port at Kure, Japan, on what naval historians have called a one-way suicide mission to relieve the embattled island. For the previous four years, the Yamato, one of the two largest battleships ever built, roamed the Pacific, intimidating all who crossed its path with its size and superior firepower. Built in 1941, the Yamato - like its sister ship, the Musashi, sunk in October 1944 at Leyte Gulf - was 863 feet long, stretching across the sea for a sixth of a mile.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 4, 2007
Kilmer S. Bortz, a decorated World War II naval aviator whose flying skills helped sink a Japanese aircraft carrier and battleship, died of heart failure Wednesday at his Lutherville home. He was 87. Mr. Bortz was born in Akron, Ohio, and moved with his family to Washington, where he graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School. His college studies at Duke University were interrupted when he enlisted in the Navy in 1941. After completing flight training at Pensacola Naval Air Station, Mr. Bortz was assigned to Bombing Squadron 11 or VB-11, where he flew Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers during the Guadalcanal campaign.
NEWS
June 11, 2007
Friedrich Adolph, the last surviving sailor Friedrich Adolph, the last surviving sailor in Uruguay from the famed German battleship Admiral Graf Spee, died Friday, his family said. Mr. Adolph had been "very sick," according to his grandson, Tobias Friedrich Adolph. The Graf Spee was considered one of the most sophisticated battleships of its time when it sank off Uruguay's coast at the outset of World War II. It prowled the South Atlantic, sinking as many as nine Allied merchant ships before warships from Britain and New Zealand tracked it down and damaged it during the Battle of the River Plate, which began Dec. 13, 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 26, 2006
Nayo Carter wanted an alternative to another night of clubbing. She was tired of having to shout at her friends on the dance floor and needed a more relaxing way to spend a Wednesday night. So Carter dusted off her collection of about 20 board games and brought them to the New Haven Lounge one Wednesday earlier this month. The event, called Got Game? turned into a weekly gig. And the result is one of the best ways to spend a Wednesday, hands down. "It was something reminiscent of everybody's' childhood," Carter said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2005
For more than 25 years, adventure novelist Clive Cussler has chronicled the derring-do of the fictional Dirk Pitt, an international explorer in the employ of the National Underwater Marine Agency (NUMA). Actor Matthew McConaughey started seeking Cussler out seven years ago in hopes of getting a chance to play Pitt on the big screen. Last year, his own version of creative stalking paid off. Tomorrow, moviegoers will get their first look at the final product. Sahara, a rollicking epic in the quasi-comedic Indiana Jones mode, takes McConaughey and co-star Penelope Cruz across West Africa in search of a mysteriously missing Civil War battleship.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
For more than a century, the military and its various operations have been inextricably linked with the Chesapeake Bay from the Aberdeen Proving Ground all the way to Norfolk, Va., home port of the Navy's Atlantic Fleet. Recently, the Navy advised Dorchester County officials that it intends to resume bombing and strafing Bloodsworth Island, a 5,361-acre piece of unoccupied bay real estate, west of Tangier Sound, and three smaller neighboring islands, which it has owned since 1942 and used for target practice until 1996.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
For more than a century, the military and its various operations have been inextricably linked with the Chesapeake Bay from the Aberdeen Proving Ground all the way to Norfolk, Va., home port of the Navy's Atlantic Fleet. Recently, the Navy advised Dorchester County officials that it intends to resume bombing and strafing Bloodsworth Island, a 5,361-acre piece of unoccupied bay real estate, west of Tangier Sound, and three smaller neighboring islands, which it has owned since 1942 and used for target practice until 1996.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 4, 1992
It took less than two minutes for a Timonium auctioneer to ge $37,400 for a toy battleship that probably sat under some youngster's Christmas tree 90 years ago.The auctioning of the battleship was typical of the fast and furious bidding last evening at a large sale of antique toys that was attended by about 220 collectors and dealers.The centerpiece of the sale was the early-1900s, German-made battleship designed to cruise an outdoor pond. It carries the name Gefion.A bidder on the phone from Paris stalled at $33,000.
NEWS
December 31, 2004
ON THE NIMBLENESS scale, the federal bureaucracy is a lot like a battleship. It doesn't turn on a dime. In fact, a president with sharply different views from the administration that preceded him can spend his whole first term trying to redirect or reverse federal policy and not make much headway. An extra four years is a different matter, as President Bush is about to prove. Building on a regulatory framework the administration has been putting in place since it came to power in 2001, the president is indeed turning the battleship.
TRAVEL
By JERRY V. HAINES and JERRY V. HAINES,Special to the Sun | July 20, 2003
With all the attention given lately to the "embedded" press, many people might want to take their own try at living as the military does. I decided to start gradually -- with World War II. The USS New Jersey, the nation's largest battleship, was launched at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on Dec. 7, 1942, a year to the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The end of World War II might have been the end of the New Jersey, as new forms of warfare obviated the classic ship vs. ship mission of battleships.
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