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HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Sgt. Antoine A. King, 41, lives in Elkton, works for the City of Havre de Grace and has spent much of the past decade serving as a medic with the Army National Guard. He was one of 10 medical personnel, representing all branches of the military, honored as Angels of the Battlefield at the fifth annual Armed Services YMCA gala Wednesday in Washington. "I really was quite surprised to receive the award and honored to represent the Army National Guard medics at this event," King said.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Polyurethane foam, long used in products such as bedding, furniture and insulation to make people more comfortable, someday also may save lives. Eight Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students have devised a tool that may stop profuse bleeding by injecting the foam into those wounded on the battlefield. As a class project, the students chose to tackle the problem of hemorrhaging, the top cause of death for service members in war. Existing devices - tourniquets and medicated bandages - can be unusable or ineffective in wounds to the neck or where limbs meet the torso.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Polyurethane foam, long used in products such as bedding, furniture and insulation to make people more comfortable, someday also may save lives. Eight Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students have devised a tool that may stop profuse bleeding by injecting the foam into those wounded on the battlefield. As a class project, the students chose to tackle the problem of hemorrhaging, the top cause of death for service members in war. Existing devices - tourniquets and medicated bandages - can be unusable or ineffective in wounds to the neck or where limbs meet the torso.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Imagine a life without smartphones, without Skype, without Wi-Fi-enabled laptops. Now imagine being a soldier in Afghanistan, patrolling remote valleys with only the most basic form of communication: A radio that can transmit only to other soldiers within your line of sight. For a decade, Patrick DeGroodt and his colleagues labored to improve battlefield communications for U.S. troops. The result is the Warfighter Information Network-Tactical, or "WIN-T" - a secure mobile communications system that allows soldiers to place phone calls, use military computer programs and send videos and photos via email, all from a souped-up Humvee driving down a dirt road halfway across the world.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just six inches below the surface in a Kent County cornfield. For nearly two centuries, the musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction. How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes at Caulk's Field?
NEWS
August 5, 1992
U.S. Rep. Beverly Byron, D-Md., said she plans to introduce legislation to expand the Antietam National Battlefield boundary by 95 acres.The boundary expansion would encompass farmland west of Md. 65 that is owned by the Conservation Fund. The fund wants to donate the land to the National Park Service, but the park service can't accept land until it is inside its congressionally approved boundary.Mrs. Byron's decision, was greeted with disappointment by neighboring property owners, especially 18 homeowners whose property will become fully encircled by National Park Service land once the acquisition is complete.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
The Maryland Correctional Institution in Hagerstown is helping stretch taxpayer dollars this summer with a hefty contribution to the Antietam National Battlefield. The unlikely donation - more than 110 tons of field stone - is being put to use by the National Park Service in the restoration of buildings at three historic farms that survived the bloodiest one-day fight of the Civil War, on Sept. 17, 1862. More than 22,000 Americans on both sides were killed or wounded in the first major battle on Northern soil.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
Jim Holechek, the Towson man who led the drive to build the Maryland memorial at Gettysburg, now wants to bag an even bigger prize: the 307-foot Gettysburg National Battlefield Tower.He wants to tear the eyesore down.Fresh from Sunday's unveiling of the Maryland memorial at Gettysburg, Mr. Holechek has launched a nationwide fund-raising campaign for more than $6 million to buy the steel-gray observation tower, dismantle it and donate its land to the National Park Service."When you're meditating on the events at Gettysburg or just walking around and looking at the monuments, you don't want this large needle looming over you," Mr. Holechek said.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Galloway and Joseph L. Galloway,U.S. News & World Report | February 22, 1991
The 91st Chemical Company, commanded by Capt. Harmit "Mitti" Randhawa, 28, of Bamberg, S.C., has a "secret weapon" in his arsenal of chemical and biological detection and decontamination gear -- six state-of-the-art German-made M-93 Fox amphibious chemical warfare vehicles.The Fox vehicles, each with a specially trained crew of four, are designed to roam the battlefield, sampling the air and earth for traces of deadly chemical warfare substances.Lt. Bob Campbell, 23, of Troy, N.Y., commands the 24th Division's Fox Recon Platoon and commands one of those six Foxes, which can go more than 80 miles an hour.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
When Regina Clark and her husband, Louis, moved into their cedar home overlooking the Magothy River eight years ago, she thought she'd found her dream home."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
After more than a dozen years fighting side by side in Afghanistan and Iraq, the Army and the National Guard are battling each other over budget cuts. The Army, tasked with restructuring for a postwar future amid rising personnel costs and spending cuts ordered by Congress, has proposed reducing the number of national guardsmen nationwide by 10 percent - from 350,000 soldiers to as few as 315,000 by 2019. In Maryland, that could mean the loss of 400 to 500 soldiers from the 4,700-member Maryland Army National Guard, according to Maj. Gen. James A. Adkins.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries, artifacts and ... quilts. The quilting form will be discussed and displayed Sunday at the Captain Avery Museum in Shady Side, as Mavis Slawson, a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, in Frederick, gives a presentation Sept. 8 on "Civil War Soldiers and Their Quilts. " Slawson said she hoped to convey that quilts provided more than just physical comfort to soldiers in the Civil War - they were also a source of emotional and spiritual solace for men who were a long way from home and in harm's way. "Many of these quilts had special meaning to the soldiers in the field or in the hospitals," said Slawson, a Columbia resident who is not only well-versed in the history of Civil War quilts but is an accomplished quilter herself.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
On a Civil War battlefield where tens of thousands of men clashed fifteen decades ago, eight Ku Klux Klan members unfurled their group's banner Saturday afternoon and called for a new uprising to oust President Barack Obama. The Klansmen — who jostled for numerical superiority with a herd of cows grazing nearby — were watched by officers from the United States Park Police and about 15 spectators, as one of them explained how he believes Obama's foreign, economic and immigration policies are threatening America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Michael G. Rinn, a Cockeysville bankruptcy attorney and longtime Civil War enthusiast who played a pivotal role in the preservation of a historic Western Maryland battlefield, died Saturday of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Hunt Valley resident was 61. "Aside from other talents and capabilities, Michael was a Chapter 7 bankruptcy trustee par excellence ; a position he held with distinction for over 25 years," said Zvi Guttman, a Baltimore bankruptcy trustee and longtime friend.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Towson junior John Paukovits spent a portion of this week worrying about Valentine's Day. It was a world away from his concerns as a soldier in the U.S. Army. Twice in seven years, Paukovits was deployed to Iraq.. Honorably discharged in 2011, Paukovits acted on his desire to pursue a college degree and rediscovered his love for lacrosse at Towson, where he is now a short-stick defensive midfielder. "Socially, it is a little bit different, but on the team, I feel like I fit right in," said Paukovits, who at 28 is the oldest player on the Tigers roster by six years.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just six inches below the surface in a Kent County cornfield. For nearly two centuries, the musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction. How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes at Caulk's Field?
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The Civil War re-enactment at Cedar Creek, near Middletown, Va., is unusual in that it takes place on the actual 1864 battleground. Proceeds from the event, sponsored by the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation, go toward the preservation of the site, acquisition of additional land, restoration of 1832 Heater House on the battlefield, and preservation of writings and artifacts relating to the battle. This year's re-enactment marks the 135th anniversary of the battle.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Air Force planes and Army artillery that showered millions of bomblets on Iraqi troops left a lethal battlefield residue that killed at least 14 Americans and wounded more than 100 soldiers during the ground phase of Operation Desert Storm, according to U.S. military officials.A Newsday investigation revealed that the cluster munitions -- explosives ranging in size from a 35mm roll of film to a softball -- caused more U.S. casualties in some instances than Iraqi troops during the four-day ground war.Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and senior Army commanders have presented the cluster munitions operation as one in a series of success stories emerging from Desert Storm.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Marie McG. Leaf, a World War II combat nurse who cared for the wounded and dying on the battlefields of Europe, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Augsburg Lutheran Home and Village in Lochearn. She was 95. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Marie Kathleen McGee was born in New York City. After her mother died when she was 3, she and her sister were sent to County Cavan in Ireland to be cared for by relatives. Her father, who had remarried, and brother moved to a home on Fulton Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
- The fighting that killed or wounded 21,000 Americans in the rolling hills of Western Maryland was over in about 12 grisly hours. But a century and a half after the bloodiest day in American military history, the struggle to preserve the ground where Union and Confederate soldiers fought the Battle of Antietam only now appears close to a declaration of victory. As Americans gather to honor the sacrifice of those who fell on Sept. 17, 1862 - as they will do this weekend and Monday on the 150th anniversary - they will do so at one of the nation's best-preserved Civil War sites.
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