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EXPLORE
April 17, 2013
MEDINA: Navy Seaman Melnard B. Medina, son of Bernardita and Michael Medina of Forest Hill, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Medina completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is "Battle Stations," to give recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet.
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NEWS
January 13, 2014
AXELSON: Navy Seaman Recruit Adrian M. Axelson, son of Jessica D. and stepson of Jared M. Silberzahn of Forest Hill, recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Axelson completed a variety of training which included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness.
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EXPLORE
May 13, 2013
WINNIE: Navy Seaman Apprentice Paul M. Winnie, son of Pamela A. and David B. Winnie of Joppa, was recently promoted to his rank upon graduation from recruit training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Winnie received the early promotion for outstanding performance during all phases of the training cycle. Training included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness.
EXPLORE
May 13, 2013
WINNIE: Navy Seaman Apprentice Paul M. Winnie, son of Pamela A. and David B. Winnie of Joppa, was recently promoted to his rank upon graduation from recruit training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Winnie received the early promotion for outstanding performance during all phases of the training cycle. Training included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1999
"I REMEMBER IT as a clear and beautiful day, with scattered clouds and not much wind." Joe Taussig was looking out at a gray day from his Annapolis home on Weems Creek, a vast distance from where he was on that other day, 58 years ago tomorrow.Then-Ensign Taussig bounded topside into that lovely weather to assume command as officer of the deck of the USS Nevada. It was 7: 50 in the morning."The Nevada band was supposed to play `The Star-Spangled Banner' at 8 o'clock sharp, and I remember being worried about the size of the flag for the ceremony.
NEWS
December 12, 1994
In 1983, President Reagan delivered his famous "Star Wars" speech pledging the nation to develop a space-based defense against nuclear attack that would make enemy missiles "impotent and obsolete." The high-tech shield would be based on a system of orbiting satellites and mirrors armed with powerful laser beams capable of zapping incoming warheads before they reached the U.S.Now, after a decade of political ups and downs, 15 years of development and more than $1 billion in research, the first space-based laser is nearly ready to fly. With newly empowered Republicans pledged to beef up the nation's defenses, the futuristic weapon once derided as a "Star Wars" fantasy almost certainly will become an issue for ideological combat in the next Congress.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | July 10, 1992
No doubt the reason why baseball and commissioner Fay Vincent are looking to clip the wings of the super stations is the Braves and WTBS, for instance, are pummeling ESPN in the ratings. For $400 million spread over four years, ESPN is reaching 1.5 million homes while TBS is doing about a third better than that at a cost of just $10 million per year.* "When It Was A Game II" is on Home Box Office at 10 p.m. Monday, the eve of the All-Star Game. Miss it and you can't really consider yourself a ball fan. This one's better than its predecessor.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 14, 1991
Special programming on the Persian Gulf crisis is planned for tonight and tomorrow evening, but network executives say most regularly scheduled shows will air as usual unless developments occur.For the first part of this week, all regular news and information programming -- from the morning shows to late-night news programs -- will focus on the Gulf. If war breaks out, NBC, ABC and CBS all say entertainment programming could be pre-empted for news during the conflict's first week."It will depend on the level of conflict," Robert Iger, president of ABC Entertainment said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 14, 1991
Los AngelesIf war begins this week in the Persian Gulf, television is going to cover it with an arsenal of technology and a commitment of dollars and manpower never before seen. The planning is so intense that it approaches the surrealism of "Dr. Strangelove" in at least one network newsroom.But that doesn't mean American viewers are going to see more graphic pictures or know more about what is happening on the battlefield than they did during military actions in Korea, Vietnam, Grenada or Panama.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Michael Stroh and Kevin Cowherd and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
PlayStation 2 is no longer just a toy. It's meat, water, shelter. And there's not enough for everybody. With only 500,000 PlayStation 2s coming to the United States - half of what Sony had planned for yesterday's launch - it isn't about video games anymore. Primal instincts have kicked in. Nowhere is that clearer than at the Best Buy on U.S. 1 in Laurel. It's just minutes past midnight on launch day and the store won't open for another 10 hours. Already more than 120 people are stacked up down the sidewalk.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Michael Stroh and Kevin Cowherd and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
PlayStation 2 is no longer just a toy. It's meat, water, shelter. And there's not enough for everybody. With only 500,000 PlayStation 2s coming to the United States - half of what Sony had planned for yesterday's launch - it isn't about video games anymore. Primal instincts have kicked in. Nowhere is that clearer than at the Best Buy on U.S. 1 in Laurel. It's just minutes past midnight on launch day and the store won't open for another 10 hours. Already more than 120 people are stacked up down the sidewalk.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1999
"I REMEMBER IT as a clear and beautiful day, with scattered clouds and not much wind." Joe Taussig was looking out at a gray day from his Annapolis home on Weems Creek, a vast distance from where he was on that other day, 58 years ago tomorrow.Then-Ensign Taussig bounded topside into that lovely weather to assume command as officer of the deck of the USS Nevada. It was 7: 50 in the morning."The Nevada band was supposed to play `The Star-Spangled Banner' at 8 o'clock sharp, and I remember being worried about the size of the flag for the ceremony.
NEWS
December 12, 1994
In 1983, President Reagan delivered his famous "Star Wars" speech pledging the nation to develop a space-based defense against nuclear attack that would make enemy missiles "impotent and obsolete." The high-tech shield would be based on a system of orbiting satellites and mirrors armed with powerful laser beams capable of zapping incoming warheads before they reached the U.S.Now, after a decade of political ups and downs, 15 years of development and more than $1 billion in research, the first space-based laser is nearly ready to fly. With newly empowered Republicans pledged to beef up the nation's defenses, the futuristic weapon once derided as a "Star Wars" fantasy almost certainly will become an issue for ideological combat in the next Congress.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | July 10, 1992
No doubt the reason why baseball and commissioner Fay Vincent are looking to clip the wings of the super stations is the Braves and WTBS, for instance, are pummeling ESPN in the ratings. For $400 million spread over four years, ESPN is reaching 1.5 million homes while TBS is doing about a third better than that at a cost of just $10 million per year.* "When It Was A Game II" is on Home Box Office at 10 p.m. Monday, the eve of the All-Star Game. Miss it and you can't really consider yourself a ball fan. This one's better than its predecessor.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 14, 1991
Los AngelesIf war begins this week in the Persian Gulf, television is going to cover it with an arsenal of technology and a commitment of dollars and manpower never before seen. The planning is so intense that it approaches the surrealism of "Dr. Strangelove" in at least one network newsroom.But that doesn't mean American viewers are going to see more graphic pictures or know more about what is happening on the battlefield than they did during military actions in Korea, Vietnam, Grenada or Panama.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 14, 1991
Special programming on the Persian Gulf crisis is planned for tonight and tomorrow evening, but network executives say most regularly scheduled shows will air as usual unless developments occur.For the first part of this week, all regular news and information programming -- from the morning shows to late-night news programs -- will focus on the Gulf. If war breaks out, NBC, ABC and CBS all say entertainment programming could be pre-empted for news during the conflict's first week."It will depend on the level of conflict," Robert Iger, president of ABC Entertainment said.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent George Rodrigue of the Dallas Morning News contributed to this article | January 21, 1991
ABOARD THE USS WISCONSIN -- Iraqi troops aboard an oil platform fought for about three hours before they were overcome, the captain of the battleship Wisconsin said.The guided missile frigate Nicholas attacked the platform about 40 miles off the Iraqi-Kuwaiti coast, killing five Iraqis and capturing 15, five of them injured, said Capt. David S. Bill III of the Wisconsin.He said the platform had been used as an observation post by the Iraqi forces, who also had fired on U.S. warplanes.The attack occurred Friday night, several hours after the Nicholas disabled two Iraqi patrol boats, sinking at least one of them.
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