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Battle Of Midway

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | June 2, 2007
It's probably the only time in history that a case of psoriasis was a contributing factor in a naval battle. As a Japanese armada of 80 ships -- including four carriers -- steamed toward Midway Island in early June 1942, Rear Adm. William F. "Bull" Halsey, Pacific commander, was forced to the sidelines because of a severe case of psoriasis that left him itching all over. He turned to Adm. Raymond Ames Spruance, who had no previous combat experience, to command one of two carrier task forces that successfully thwarted Japan's plans of invading Hawaii and destroying what remained of the U.S. fleet.
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NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
OUTSIDE FORT MEADE - God bless 'em, but the nation's secret code-breakers and eavesdroppers aren't exactly the most sociable folks you'll ever meet. Many of them are hidden away here, behind the National Security Agency's bunkered fortifications, which are so foreboding they'd make Dick Cheney's eyes glisten with envy. Others work in uniform on dusty battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan, and man austere listening posts across the Middle East and Asia. They are descendants of an early generation of code-breakers recruited on the eve of World War II, a group of Navy women who were told if they breathed a word to civilians about their work, they'd be shot.
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NEWS
By NATHAN MILLER | May 31, 1992
Washington. -- Rising and falling on the bumpy air currents, a lone PBY patrol plane droned over the empty Pacific, some 700 miles to the west of Midway Island on June 3, 1942, on the look-out for an advancing Japanese fleet. Suddenly, the clouds parted momentarily and Ensign Jewell H. Reid, the pilot of the craft, spotted a large formation of ships on the horizon."Do you see what I see?" he asked his co-pilot."You're damn right I do!" was the vigorous response.Rapidly ducking back into the cloud cover, they radioed the report of the sighting to Pearl Harbor, where Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, commander of the U.S. fleet, was anxiously awaiting it. Nimitz greeted the news with "a bright, white smile," according to one of his aides.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2007
Patrick Weadon Curator National Cryptologic Museum, Fort Meade Salary --$93,000 Age --51 Years on the job --Three The museum --The National Security Agency operates the National Cryptologic Museum, one of only two intelligence museums open to the public in the United States. Weadon is one of three full-time NSA employees who staff the museum. About 50,000 to 60,000 visitors come annually to view exhibits about cryptology - the making and breaking of codes. How he got started --Weadon went to work at the NSA in 1987 first as a special agent in the Office of Security, then as an intelligence research analyst.
NEWS
November 4, 1994
Cmdr. Wilhelm G. Esders, 80, last surviving pilot of a doomed torpedo attack by three Navy squadrons at the World War II Battle of Midway, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Pensacola, Fla. At Midway, 39 of 41 pilots and all but one crewman in the assault perished. Only Lloyd Childers, a radioman-gunner who later became a Marine Corps pilot, is still alive.Donn Arden, 78, who is best known for producing the musical "Jubilee!" that continues to play at Bally's in Las Vegas after 13 years, died Wednesday in the gambling resort.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
Charles Richard Broderick Jr., a World War II Navy officer who received the Silver Star and Purple Heart and survived a direct hit on his gun battery aboard the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Glyndon. He was 78.After the war, Mr. Broderick worked for several companies in Baltimore, including the American and Gunther breweries. He founded the Bees Distributing Co. in 1955, a beer-distribution firm that remains a family business.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
George H Gay Jr., 77, the only member of his Navy flight squadron who lived to tell about the United States' victory over Japan in the battle of Midway, died Friday of a heart attack in Marietta, Ga. All of the planes in his Torpedo Squadron 8 were shot down during an attack on Japanese warships near Midway Island on June 4, 1942. He was the only survivor. Wounded and wearing a life jacket, he drifted at sea watching other American planes hurtle out of the clouds to attack Japanese aircraft carriers.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2001
Flanked by a Marine Corps color guard, the 10 elderly veterans stood in the Severn School gymnasium yesterday and their gravelly voices called out the names of 84 classmates who had died in the wars of the 20th century. To signify the loss, the school had arranged 84 chairs at center court and filled them with current Severn students. As each name was read, a student stood up and walked away, escorted to the door by a Marine sergeant. After a half-hour, all 84 chairs sat empty, mute testament to the lives lost from this private school in Severna Park that has channeled students to the Naval Academy for almost a century.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
An underdog U.S. Navy broke the back of the Japanese fleet June 4, 1942, at the Battle of Midway. The ships never saw one another; the battle raged between carrier planes in the most decisive naval engagement of World War II.Yesterday, three large wooden crates containing the pieces of carved granite that will be the permanent battle memorial arrived at Martin State Airport from a Thurmont monument company to begin their journey to the tiny Midway Islands,...
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
A Holocaust survivor didn't tell his children or his parents about the time he spent in the Warsaw ghetto. But he told students and their video camera. Fighter pilots spent hours telling another student about the Battle of Midway. He in turn spent 20 hours editing their words on film. These documentaries, both by Maryland students, reached the final round of the 25th annual National History Day contest this week in Washington. Winners in four presentation categories will be announced today(in a ceremony that will be Webcast live from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on www.TheHistoryChannel.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | June 2, 2007
It's probably the only time in history that a case of psoriasis was a contributing factor in a naval battle. As a Japanese armada of 80 ships -- including four carriers -- steamed toward Midway Island in early June 1942, Rear Adm. William F. "Bull" Halsey, Pacific commander, was forced to the sidelines because of a severe case of psoriasis that left him itching all over. He turned to Adm. Raymond Ames Spruance, who had no previous combat experience, to command one of two carrier task forces that successfully thwarted Japan's plans of invading Hawaii and destroying what remained of the U.S. fleet.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2001
Flanked by a Marine Corps color guard, the 10 elderly veterans stood in the Severn School gymnasium yesterday and their gravelly voices called out the names of 84 classmates who had died in the wars of the 20th century. To signify the loss, the school had arranged 84 chairs at center court and filled them with current Severn students. As each name was read, a student stood up and walked away, escorted to the door by a Marine sergeant. After a half-hour, all 84 chairs sat empty, mute testament to the lives lost from this private school in Severna Park that has channeled students to the Naval Academy for almost a century.
FEATURES
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2000
A Holocaust survivor didn't tell his children or his parents about the time he spent in the Warsaw ghetto. But he told students and their video camera. Fighter pilots spent hours telling another student about the Battle of Midway. He in turn spent 20 hours editing their words on film. These documentaries, both by Maryland students, reached the final round of the 25th annual National History Day contest this week in Washington. Winners in four presentation categories will be announced today(in a ceremony that will be Webcast live from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on www.TheHistoryChannel.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
Charles Richard Broderick Jr., a World War II Navy officer who received the Silver Star and Purple Heart and survived a direct hit on his gun battery aboard the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Glyndon. He was 78.After the war, Mr. Broderick worked for several companies in Baltimore, including the American and Gunther breweries. He founded the Bees Distributing Co. in 1955, a beer-distribution firm that remains a family business.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
An underdog U.S. Navy broke the back of the Japanese fleet June 4, 1942, at the Battle of Midway. The ships never saw one another; the battle raged between carrier planes in the most decisive naval engagement of World War II.Yesterday, three large wooden crates containing the pieces of carved granite that will be the permanent battle memorial arrived at Martin State Airport from a Thurmont monument company to begin their journey to the tiny Midway Islands,...
NEWS
November 4, 1994
Cmdr. Wilhelm G. Esders, 80, last surviving pilot of a doomed torpedo attack by three Navy squadrons at the World War II Battle of Midway, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Pensacola, Fla. At Midway, 39 of 41 pilots and all but one crewman in the assault perished. Only Lloyd Childers, a radioman-gunner who later became a Marine Corps pilot, is still alive.Donn Arden, 78, who is best known for producing the musical "Jubilee!" that continues to play at Bally's in Las Vegas after 13 years, died Wednesday in the gambling resort.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2007
Patrick Weadon Curator National Cryptologic Museum, Fort Meade Salary --$93,000 Age --51 Years on the job --Three The museum --The National Security Agency operates the National Cryptologic Museum, one of only two intelligence museums open to the public in the United States. Weadon is one of three full-time NSA employees who staff the museum. About 50,000 to 60,000 visitors come annually to view exhibits about cryptology - the making and breaking of codes. How he got started --Weadon went to work at the NSA in 1987 first as a special agent in the Office of Security, then as an intelligence research analyst.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
George H Gay Jr., 77, the only member of his Navy flight squadron who lived to tell about the United States' victory over Japan in the battle of Midway, died Friday of a heart attack in Marietta, Ga. All of the planes in his Torpedo Squadron 8 were shot down during an attack on Japanese warships near Midway Island on June 4, 1942. He was the only survivor. Wounded and wearing a life jacket, he drifted at sea watching other American planes hurtle out of the clouds to attack Japanese aircraft carriers.
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