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By LAURA CHARLES | July 3, 1991
YOU'RE INVITED to drop by the Pikesville Hilton tonight for a live broadcast of the Les Kinsolving Show from 7 until 10. Seems Les, a Civil War buff, and his WCBM-AM cohort, Frank Luber, will be re-creating scenes from the Battle of Gettysburg in full costume complete with music and sound effects. All the action, by the b'eye, takes place in Gabby's Lounge -- which is rather appropriate, don't you think?TABLE HOPPING: We're happy to hear that Irina Barshay, the 30-year-old dynamo who owns the Unlimited Range restaurant at Barclay and East 32nd streets, re-opened her establishment last Tuesday with an all-new layout and an art show by local artist (and gourmet cook)
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By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Curious about the weather during the Battle of Gettysburg fought by soldiers in wool uniforms July 1-3, 1863? The Rev. Dr. Michael Jacobs , a math and science professor at Pennsylvania College, now Gettysburg College, recorded the temperatures three times a day during the battle: 7 a.m., 2 p.m., and 9 p.m. On July 1 the temperature at 2 p.m. was 76 degrees and the sky was cloudy. At 2 p.m. July 2, it was 81 and partly cloudy. It was 87 degrees at 2 p.m. July 3, the time of Pickett's Charge.
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By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,Sun Staff | July 4, 1999
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- A line of Union soldiers crawled on their bellies in the 90-degree heat yesterday, their eyes scanning the horizon for the perfect shot. They squeezed their triggers in unison, and a handful of Confederates tumbled backward.The Yankees continued their forward push for about a half-hour, but in the end they were driven back, the Southern artillery too much for them to handle. With every bugle shrill and thundering round of cannon fire, the Northern soldiers ran in retreat.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 9, 2011
E. Patrick Moloney, a banker turned educator who passed onto generations of Archbishop Curley High students his enthusiasm and passion for American and Maryland history, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Northeast Baltimore resident was 79. Mr. Moloney, the son of a Baltimore police officer and a homemaker, was born Edward Patrick Moloney in Baltimore and raised in the city's Bel Air-Edison neighborhood. "He never used his first name," said his wife of 33 years, the former Rose Dagostaro.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | July 10, 1991
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- Gettysburg is under siege, and the struggle is as much over fallow fields as hallowed ground.Spurred by the widening of a nearby highway and the opening of a Wal-Mart to call its own, this historic town is witnessing unprecedented pressure from developers, one of whom is proposing a 320,000-square-foot shopping center that would abut the Civil War battlefield.The plan has loosed volleys of displeasure not heard since the Erector-set-like, 330-foot-tall National Tower observation platform was raised nearly a score of years ago.Gettysburg Borough and the surrounding townships have long been at odds over the nature and amount of development that should be permitted, with some municipal officials contending that the economy has suffered by attempts to keep the park setting pristine.
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By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2003
To explore Maryland neighborhoods and bay and beach towns, go to www.SunSpot.net/neighborhoodsGETTYSBURG - Cannons will roar and soldiers will fall, women will weep and the lonesome cry of a single bugle will fill the weary night. One-hundred and 40 years after the Battle of Gettysburg, thousands of Civil War re-enactors and battle spectators will converge upon this quiet Pennsylvania city Aug. 8-10 to relive the tragedy once more. More than 51,000 soldiers died or were wounded or captured at Gettysburg in 1863.
NEWS
By Stacy Malyil and Stacy Malyil,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
The Battle of Gettysburg turned the tide of the Civil War, and Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, proved to be the climactic clash of that battle. Spearheading this frontal assault on the Union line on Cemetery Ridge was Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead's brigade, which crossed into history and legend as it crossed the angle of a stone wall protecting the Union troops atop the ridge, and plowed into Union forces under Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb, whose brigade did not have a strong hold on the position.
TRAVEL
By Charles W. Mitchell and By Charles W. Mitchell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
Your move," says the young soldier sitting across from me on an ammo crate. I lean forward, adjusting my artillery cap, and grab a wooden checker from the checkerboard. Ham steaks sizzle on the fire behind us. A cavalry detachment rides slowly along the tree line, eyeing enemy pickets in the distance. My opponent frowns as I jump him. Behind our white canvas tents, a private caresses the barrel of a 12-pound howitzer, assessing its readiness for the Union army just over the ridge. We're encamped on a Pennsylvania farm with 4,000 men and women for the annual restaging of the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Kewannah Wallace and Kewannah Wallace,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Union Col. Strong Vincent used his ingenuity and deployed over 1,300 troops to Little Round Top in a critical move just before Confederate troops arrived during the second day of the fighting at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Stories of the battle at Little Round Top usually focus on Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain as the hero. However, in letters published in Oliver Norton's 1983 book, The Attack and Defense of Little Round Top, Chamberlain credits Vincent's quick thinking. "I regard the timely occupation of that position, which was at that stage of the battle key to the Union defense, as due to the energy and skill of Col. Vincent," wrote Chamberlain.
TRAVEL
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2008
I grew up in Pennsylvania, near Valley Forge and Independence Hall, two of the most exalted places in American history. But it was always a little town to the west that stole the show - Gettysburg, where thousands fought to the death for the very soul of our country. And yet, despite numerous school field trips and family visits, Gettysburg and its sprawling Civil War battlefield always left me a little cold. I know that's heresy, especially for a native Pennsylvanian. Even worse, one of my ancestors was a Civil War veteran.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | April 14, 2008
Gettysburg has been a magnet for visitors ever since scavengers began scouring the land for dead soldiers' weapons, knapsacks and belt buckles shortly after the epic Civil War battle ended there in July 1863. But many who traipse around the rolling countryside, gaze at monuments to fallen generals and shop for souvenirs end up leaving the area without knowing exactly what they have seen or why it is important. Starting today, visitors will have a new way to learn about the Battle of Gettysburg and the role it played in U.S. history, when a $103 million Museum and Visitor Center opens at the Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
October 28, 2007
Gen. James J. Archer was the grandson of Dr. John Archer, the first graduate of medicine in America. He was born in Stafford, southeast of Darlington on Deer Creek, in 1817. Unlike the many members of his family who gained prominence in the county as doctors or lawyers, Archer pursued a career in the military. After studying law at Princeton University, Archer volunteered for duty in the Mexican-American War. When the Civil War broke out, he sided with the South. Leading regiments from Georgia and Texas, he fought in the battles of Mechanicsville, Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Shepherdsville, Chancellorsville, Second Manassas and Harpers Ferry.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | September 17, 2006
In the days leading up to the fifth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, the nation's newspapers, magazines and broadcast media found a thousand and one innovative ways to assess how America and its citizens have been changed by that momentous event. There was a sense, widely felt in the media, that the attacks were this generation's Pearl Harbor or JFK assassination. The extensive coverage in The Sun and elsewhere also reflected a growing demand for so-called "anniversary" journalism.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here." - The Gettysburg Address LAST WEEKEND at Gettysburg, thousands of re-enactors and spectators gathered for the 142nd anniversary of the three-day battle that was a turning point in the Civil War . But just hours after the Union Army again repelled Pickett's Charge and sent the South packing, a more modern Battle of Gettysburg quietly continued -...
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
While the annual Gettysburg battle re-enactment always provides a great deal of action and excitement, it also serves to support preservation around the area. Every year, the Gettysburg Anniversary Committee chooses a number of different organizations to support. The 141st Gettysburg Re-enactment, which took place last summer, was no different. One of the organizations supported by the re-enactment was the National Trust for Historic Gettysburg. According to the Annual Gettysburg Civil War Battle Re-enactment Web site, the National Trust is involved in a number of restoration efforts around Gettysburg.
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