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Battle Monument

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Chloe A. Gudmundsson is a senior at Eastern Technical High School in Essex, and at the suggestion of her English teacher, she decided to research a paper on Maximilian Godefroy, the quirky architect who designed Baltimore's Battle Monument to commemorate the battle for the city in 1814. She also decided to submit her paper to the annual History Day competition this month on the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County. The competition, which has been held for the last 12 years at Dundalk, features both city and Baltimore County public school students.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A Dundalk man has been charged with stealing and scrapping the historic wrought-iron gates at Battle Acre Monument Park that were reported missing in June, Baltimore County Police said. Detectives have charged George Elias Sotirakis, 34, in the theft, after detectives said he was spotted on surveillance video, and identified through information from local scrap yards. As for the gates, "unfortunately the gates are gone forever," police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter said. The 100-year-old spiked gates had long adorned the park's North Point Road entrance, and were placed during a previous improvements to the park in 1914.
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NEWS
By Stacey Patton and Stacey Patton,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Lady Baltimore, a 182-year-old woman who presides in the middle of Calvert Street, is undergoing reconstructive surgery.For two months, planners and restoration workers have been focusing their attention on trying to get the Lady Baltimore statue -- a key figure that adorns the Battle Monument -- back into top shape.Time, weather and pollution have taken their toll on the old lady. ++ She has withstood innumerable threats of eviction -- the most emphatic in 1923, 1925 and 1930 -- and has been accused of being a traffic menace, an aesthetic blot, a cracked and moldering relic.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Wrought-iron gates erected to preserve Battle Acre Monument Park, one of Dundalk's War of 1812 sites, have been stolen, police said, even as they were being restored in time for September's celebration of the war's bicentennial. Baltimore County police said the spiked gates on North Point Road that adorned the long-neglected park, wedged between shopping centers and brick rowhouses, were reported missing by a volunteer on Monday. "I'm a little upset about it. They are trying to get this park ready for the big celebration in September.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Brenda J. Buote and Jacques Kelly and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1997
Flags were unfurled and muskets fired in downtown Baltimore yesterday as politicians and militiamen gathered to rededicate one of the city's most prominent monuments -- the statue that honors those who fought in the Battle of Baltimore and inspired the national anthem.Dressed in military regalia from the War of 1812, the Baltimore Ceremonial Guard, Captain Howard's Company of Mechanical Volunteers of the 5th Maryland Regiment and Aisquith's Sharpshooters began the hourlong ceremony at the city courthouse with a short parade from City Hall on Holliday Street to the Battle Monument on Calvert Street, between Lexington and Fayette streets.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
Lady Baltimore's right arm looks as if it has been attacked by the flesh-eating virus. Her face has been darkened by soot from years of auto exhaust. Her crown is tarnished, and green fungus is growing up her robe.But by early next year she could be presentable again, if friends can raise enough money for a long-overdue face lift.Baltimore's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation is scheduled today to join local historians and others to launch a $250,000 fund drive aimed at restoring Lady Baltimore and the memorial she adorns, the Battle Monument on Calvert Street near Fayette Street.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Lady Baltimore has withstood much in 189 years perched overlooking Courthouse Square. She has lost both of her arms over the decades — one of them, holding high a wreath that signifies service to the republic, was sheared off by a gust of wind in January 1938, shattering on the pavement. And though it may be hard to tell from the street 52 feet below, wind, rain, snow, hail and pollution have dissolved much of the marble statue's eyes, nose and ears. But a new effort will finally give Lady Baltimore a new home — for her own good.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
If you work downtown, you have seen her. She sits on the east side of the Battle Monument most every weekday, her legs in their white ankle socks and black sneakers dangling perilously close to the traffic that hurtles by. Chances are, she hasn't spoken to you. She speaks to almost no one. Always, when you see her, she is writing. On first glance, perhaps you thought she was a lawyer. She has a decent overcoat, after all, and a cart that could be used for hauling legal papers back and forth between courthouses.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2001
As a child, Christina Blackman spent summers riding ponies on a North Dakota farm not far from where her great-grandmother taught immigrant children how to read and write in a one-room schoolhouse. "In some ways, I feel I've inherited my teaching career," Blackman said yesterday in an emotional address to a roomful of educators who gathered to honor her as Baltimore County's Teacher of the Year 2001. Blackman, 33, has taught music to special education students at Battle Monument School in Dundalk for 11 years.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2002
The recently cleaned facades of Baltimore's Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse and Courthouse East were put in the spotlight last night as Mayor Martin O'Malley and other city officials unveiled a $37,000 lighting system that will accentuate the buildings after dark. The 11 acorn-shaped street lights, each with two additional floodlights, span "Courthouse Square" on Calvert Street, between Fayette and Lexington streets, and show off the results of a four-month, $94,000 exterior cleaning that rid the buildings of years of grime and bird droppings.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
What's a monument lighting without fish tacos or Polish sausage? On Thursday night, crowds arriving early for the annual lighting of Baltimore's Washington Monument will have plenty of food vendors to keep them company while they wait for things to get rolling. The dramatic monument lighting itself happens at approximately 7:45 p.m., and stage entertainment, which includes choirs and dancing Santas, begins at 6 p.m. But the festivities begin even earlier, at 5 p.m., with food and craft vendors assembling for a holiday village in Mount Vernon Place's west square, the main gathering space for the event.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
What's a monument lighting without fish tacos or Polish sausage? On Thursday night, crowds arriving early for the annual lighting of Baltimore's Washington Monument will have plenty of food vendors to keep them company while they wait for things to get rolling. The dramatic monument lighting itself happens at approximately 7:45 p.m., and stage entertainment, which includes choirs and dancing Santas, begins at 6 p.m. But the festivities begin even earlier, at 5 p.m., with food and craft vendors assembling for a holiday village in Mount Vernon Place's west square, the main gathering space for the event.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Lady Baltimore was gingerly moved Saturday from its 190-year-old home overlooking Baltimore's Courthouse Square and taken to a new residence that will shield it from outside elements that have worn away its features. The hope is that its new home at the Maryland Historical Society Museum and Library in Mount Vernon will give it a longer life. Since 1822, the 8-foot female statue has perched atop the Battle Monument, the historic structure at Fayette and Calvert Streets that honors the soldiers who lost their lives at the Battle of North Point and the bombing of Fort McHenry in 1814.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Lady Baltimore's moving plans have changed. Once she comes down from her 190-year perch atop the Battle Monument overlooking Courthouse Square - the scaffolding is up and the project is underway - she will take up a new, indoor residence at the Maryland Historical Society Museum and Library in Mount Vernon, society officials said. An earlier plan to relocate the marble statue, which honors the Battle of North Point and the bombardment of Fort McHenry in 1814, had called for it to be relocated to the Walters Art Museum , but Lady Baltimore was too heavy for the museum's floors.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Chloe A. Gudmundsson is a senior at Eastern Technical High School in Essex, and at the suggestion of her English teacher, she decided to research a paper on Maximilian Godefroy, the quirky architect who designed Baltimore's Battle Monument to commemorate the battle for the city in 1814. She also decided to submit her paper to the annual History Day competition this month on the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County. The competition, which has been held for the last 12 years at Dundalk, features both city and Baltimore County public school students.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Charles Pomeroy Ives III, a state of Maryland telecommunications worker who immersed himself in history causes from North Point to Carroll County, died in his sleep of a circulatory illness Oct. 20 at his Stoneleigh home. He was 63. Born in Elizabeth, N.J., and raised in Loch Raven Village, he was a 1967 Towson High School graduate. He had belonged to the Boy Scouts. His grandfather, C.P. Ives, was a Sun editorial writer from 1939 to 1973. Mr. Ives earned a bachelor's degree in history at Thiel College in Greenville, Pa. He worked at Baltimore banks, the Venable law firm and Ciena.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Lady Baltimore's moving plans have changed. Once she comes down from her 190-year perch atop the Battle Monument overlooking Courthouse Square - the scaffolding is up and the project is underway - she will take up a new, indoor residence at the Maryland Historical Society Museum and Library in Mount Vernon, society officials said. An earlier plan to relocate the marble statue, which honors the Battle of North Point and the bombardment of Fort McHenry in 1814, had called for it to be relocated to the Walters Art Museum , but Lady Baltimore was too heavy for the museum's floors.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Contributing Writer | May 23, 1994
Maria Lee Garitee, a retired guidance counselor whose work with handicapped children went far beyond her school duties, died Friday at her home in Towson after a five-year battle with cancer. She was 64.An educator in Baltimore County for 33 years, Mrs. Garitee committed her life to helping others, said her daughter Meridith Muehleib of Fairfax Station, Va."She wasn't satisfied to just get her handicapped students through school, she also worked hard to prepare them for the community and job market after graduating," Mrs. Muehleib said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Lady Baltimore has withstood much in 189 years perched overlooking Courthouse Square. She has lost both of her arms over the decades — one of them, holding high a wreath that signifies service to the republic, was sheared off by a gust of wind in January 1938, shattering on the pavement. And though it may be hard to tell from the street 52 feet below, wind, rain, snow, hail and pollution have dissolved much of the marble statue's eyes, nose and ears. But a new effort will finally give Lady Baltimore a new home — for her own good.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 1, 2003
I'M AS frustrated as the next guy at all the traffic tie-ups downtown, now knotted up in one of its periodic frenzies of new construction. I watch the meter on my taxi click away as the line of cars remains immobile, while a concrete mixer deposits a fresh batch to Fayette and Howard streets. So, one day, I said "enough" and just got out and walked and walked. Along the way, I did some snooping and investigating. It's time to take a look at the new Baltimore that has been refreshed and rebuilt over the summer and fall of 2003.
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