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NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 19, 1993
THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE. By T. Coraghessan Boyle. Viking Penguin. 476 pages. $22.50. ANY doctor who prescribed five enemas a day, sexual abstinence and high doses of radium for an ulcer would be kicked out of town before sunset.Unless, of course, that doctor was Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his town was Battle Creek, Mich., in 1907. There, Kellogg, the self-proclaimed health messiah and inventor of corn flakes and peanut butter, reigned supreme. For more than 20 years, Kellogg's sanitarium devoted to "scientific living" attracted the best and brightest of Americans looking for the magic cure.
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NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 23, 2006
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. -- Bob Randels, Rose Miller and Teresa Osborne spend most of their waking hours rescuing food. They're not dumpster divers, but they are relentless in their pursuit of pizzas that weren't picked up, sub shop bread that wasn't used and even small bags of shrimp from the local Red Lobster that didn't get tossed into a pasta Alfredo. Their efforts are part of a much larger, organized daily hustle to meet the increasing need to feed the hungry. "We're trying to keep pace, as much as we can," said Randels, executive director of the Food Bank of South Central Michigan, which served 92,000 people last year, up almost 50 percent from 62,000 in 2001.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1995
International Youth Foundation Inc., the philanthropic group that may move its headquarters to Maryland, has scratched Annapolis and London from its list of potential homes.Baltimore, Atlanta and Battle Creek, Mich., are still in contention. The foundation's board had expected to choose a site over the weekend but was delayed by last-minute expressions of interest from the state of Michigan, said Doug Franklin, director of social marketing for the foundation. A decision isn't expected now until December.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 15, 2004
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. - The George W. Bush road show that pulled into Cereal City the other day clearly demonstrated the political reality of what John Kerry faces against an incumbent president who, unlike Mr. Kerry, has an unambiguous campaign message down pat. Combining the trappings of the presidency and a sharply honed stump speech delivered with a brutally direct assault on Mr. Kerry as a flip-flopper, the president is a far more effective campaigner today...
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | September 5, 1993
The sun blazed and the deerflies attacked at the top of the hill, but here at the bottom, the air is 10 degrees cooler, bugs don't bite and the creek ripples placidly around cypress roots.Down here, you're in the Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Sanctuary, a 100-acre "primordial world," as a Calvert County tourism pamphlet calls it."Cypress has been at Battle Creek thousands of years," says Andy Brown, 29, senior naturalist at the swamp's nature center. "The mystery is why it's here. Most cypress stands are found in river valleys.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Planners and activists throughout Baltimore are hopeful that a unique development plan designed to boost property values, image and community togetherness can help revive the city's struggling working-class neighborhoods.In a few years, they should see results in the east-side neighborhood of Belair-Edison.There, a small community nonprofit group is in the first stages of implementing the Healthy Neighborhoods concept, an aggressive strategy gaining national attention after redeveloping severely blighted neighborhoods in Battle Creek, Mich.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Kevin L. McQuaid and Jay Hancock and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
The International Youth Foundation, a growing charity that has secured pledges of $110 million in its five-year existence, said yesterday it will move its headquarters and staff of 30 from Battle Creek, Mich., to Baltimore.With a combination of financial incentives from the state, city and private organizations, Baltimore won out over Atlanta and the state of Michigan in a competition for the foundation.Saying that all the necessary contracts aren't signed yet, Maryland and foundation officials declined to reveal details of the incentive package or the planned location of IYF's offices.
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 23, 2006
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. -- Bob Randels, Rose Miller and Teresa Osborne spend most of their waking hours rescuing food. They're not dumpster divers, but they are relentless in their pursuit of pizzas that weren't picked up, sub shop bread that wasn't used and even small bags of shrimp from the local Red Lobster that didn't get tossed into a pasta Alfredo. Their efforts are part of a much larger, organized daily hustle to meet the increasing need to feed the hungry. "We're trying to keep pace, as much as we can," said Randels, executive director of the Food Bank of South Central Michigan, which served 92,000 people last year, up almost 50 percent from 62,000 in 2001.
NEWS
August 12, 2000
CAN A TARGETED infusion of public and private funds make certain Baltimore neighborhoods more attractive to homebuyers? The city is about to spend $3 million to find out. It is searching for six pilot communities. Requirements: Each must have a strong community organization, a clear strategy for improvement and a sound housing stock. Even though this tactic has been successful in places like Battle Creek, Mich., there is no guarantee that it will work here. Yet the approach is well worth trying.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 15, 2004
BATTLE CREEK, Mich. - The George W. Bush road show that pulled into Cereal City the other day clearly demonstrated the political reality of what John Kerry faces against an incumbent president who, unlike Mr. Kerry, has an unambiguous campaign message down pat. Combining the trappings of the presidency and a sharply honed stump speech delivered with a brutally direct assault on Mr. Kerry as a flip-flopper, the president is a far more effective campaigner today...
NEWS
August 12, 2000
CAN A TARGETED infusion of public and private funds make certain Baltimore neighborhoods more attractive to homebuyers? The city is about to spend $3 million to find out. It is searching for six pilot communities. Requirements: Each must have a strong community organization, a clear strategy for improvement and a sound housing stock. Even though this tactic has been successful in places like Battle Creek, Mich., there is no guarantee that it will work here. Yet the approach is well worth trying.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
Planners and activists throughout Baltimore are hopeful that a unique development plan designed to boost property values, image and community togetherness can help revive the city's struggling working-class neighborhoods.In a few years, they should see results in the east-side neighborhood of Belair-Edison.There, a small community nonprofit group is in the first stages of implementing the Healthy Neighborhoods concept, an aggressive strategy gaining national attention after redeveloping severely blighted neighborhoods in Battle Creek, Mich.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The following special dispatch of the New York World gives a graphic account of the great battle fought on Wednesday last in the Shenandoah Valley:[Special Dispatch to the New York World.]Full Account of the Battle -- Our Forces at First Surprised -- Subsequent Victory -- Splendid Conduct of the Soldiers -- What has been Gained by the Victory.Headquarters Army of the Shenandoah, October 19 -- via Washington, Oct. 20. -- Another sanguinary battle -- the fortunes of which were in the beginning, apparently adverse, but the results of which are quite as encouraging as those of any which has preceded it in the Valley -- has consumed the entire day, from dawn to nightfall.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Kevin L. McQuaid and Jay Hancock and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
The International Youth Foundation, a growing charity that has secured pledges of $110 million in its five-year existence, said yesterday it will move its headquarters and staff of 30 from Battle Creek, Mich., to Baltimore.With a combination of financial incentives from the state, city and private organizations, Baltimore won out over Atlanta and the state of Michigan in a competition for the foundation.Saying that all the necessary contracts aren't signed yet, Maryland and foundation officials declined to reveal details of the incentive package or the planned location of IYF's offices.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1995
International Youth Foundation Inc., the philanthropic group that may move its headquarters to Maryland, has scratched Annapolis and London from its list of potential homes.Baltimore, Atlanta and Battle Creek, Mich., are still in contention. The foundation's board had expected to choose a site over the weekend but was delayed by last-minute expressions of interest from the state of Michigan, said Doug Franklin, director of social marketing for the foundation. A decision isn't expected now until December.
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | September 5, 1993
The sun blazed and the deerflies attacked at the top of the hill, but here at the bottom, the air is 10 degrees cooler, bugs don't bite and the creek ripples placidly around cypress roots.Down here, you're in the Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Sanctuary, a 100-acre "primordial world," as a Calvert County tourism pamphlet calls it."Cypress has been at Battle Creek thousands of years," says Andy Brown, 29, senior naturalist at the swamp's nature center. "The mystery is why it's here. Most cypress stands are found in river valleys.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The following special dispatch of the New York World gives a graphic account of the great battle fought on Wednesday last in the Shenandoah Valley:[Special Dispatch to the New York World.]Full Account of the Battle -- Our Forces at First Surprised -- Subsequent Victory -- Splendid Conduct of the Soldiers -- What has been Gained by the Victory.Headquarters Army of the Shenandoah, October 19 -- via Washington, Oct. 20. -- Another sanguinary battle -- the fortunes of which were in the beginning, apparently adverse, but the results of which are quite as encouraging as those of any which has preceded it in the Valley -- has consumed the entire day, from dawn to nightfall.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck and Abbe Gluck,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
The International Youth Foundation yesterday kicked off its move to Baltimore by telling local leaders that corporate citizenship is one of its first orders of business."
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | July 19, 1993
THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE. By T. Coraghessan Boyle. Viking Penguin. 476 pages. $22.50. ANY doctor who prescribed five enemas a day, sexual abstinence and high doses of radium for an ulcer would be kicked out of town before sunset.Unless, of course, that doctor was Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his town was Battle Creek, Mich., in 1907. There, Kellogg, the self-proclaimed health messiah and inventor of corn flakes and peanut butter, reigned supreme. For more than 20 years, Kellogg's sanitarium devoted to "scientific living" attracted the best and brightest of Americans looking for the magic cure.
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