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Batting Cage

SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
When David Segui has a bad game, he doesn't take it home with him, he takes it to his office.In this case, that office can be found in the privacy of the Orioles' batting cage under the stands at Camden Yards.And there, Segui will hit, and hit, and hit some more, until he is satisfied he has solved his problem.It is the price Segui, 25, happily pays for his role with the Orioles. He is, after all, a role player -- part-time first baseman, part-time outfielder and full-time worker.It is not unusual, Segui says, for him to be working on his swing in the batting cage as late as 1 o'clock in the morning.
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SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - At 10 minutes past noon yesterday, longtime Orioles bullpen coach Elrod Hendricks steered his golf cart into position at Fort Lauderdale Stadium and sounded the air horn. Within moments, the key components of a vastly improved Orioles infield were in place together for the first time, going through the first cadences of a long season. Orioles bench coach Sam Perlozzo took a knee behind the pitcher's mound and tossed grounders to $72 million shortstop Miguel Tejada, who quickly fed the balls to a rotating quartet of second basemen that included two friends fighting for the starting job: Jerry Hairston and Brian Roberts.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
No one will argue that the Orioles' offense could use a bit of a boost. Whether two men who joined them Thursday in batting practice could provide it is a different conversation entirely. Former Orioles Harold Reynolds and Brady Anderson were in full uniform yesterday before the Orioles' 3-1 loss to Houston, with Reynolds taking his hacks in the batting cage and trying to regain his late-80s All-Star form. Reynolds, now an MLB Network analyst, will broadcast today's Civil Rights Game in Houston.
FEATURES
By Kim Wesley | October 9, 1994
Working for recovery through self-relianceWhen Marguerite Nichols and Paula Rangel aren't in class learning psychology or public speaking, they're busy keeping people off alcohol and drugs. Together they run a self-help group in Baltimore called Rational Recovery (RR)."Sometimes people come to the meeting with a lot of anger, or a great sense of worthlessness," Ms. Rangel says. "What we try to do is give them the tools they need to deal with those emotions. They learn how to reason with the inner voice that's telling them to have a drink."
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder | February 24, 1995
Sherman ObandoWhat he would be doing if there were no strike: Obando, who turned 25 last month, would be preparing for his second season with the Orioles after tearing up Triple-A pitching at Rochester last season (.330, 20 home runs, 69 RBIs). The Rule V draftee is one of the leading candidates to be the team's starting right fielder. Obando may platoon at that position with Jeffrey Hammonds or at the designated hitter's spot with Harold Baines.Where he is instead: Obando permanently moved from Maryland to a new home in Orlando, Fla.How he's filling his time: Obando is working his way back into shape after suffering a season-ending hairline fracture of his right shin last August and undergoing off-season knee surgery.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Entering Sunday's series finale with Detroit, the Orioles bench had struggled throughout the year in contributing late in games, hitting just 1-for-18 in pinch-hit situations. But against the Tigers, the Orioles got their first pinch hit since May 20 when Danny Valencia knocked in the tying run on a single to right field off Tigers reliever Phil Coke in the seventh inning. “I knew he had good stuff,” Valencia said. “I actually saw both of his pitches. He threw me a fastball first pitch and a slider second pitch.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2007
SEATTLE -- After taking ground balls for 20 minutes and then proceeding to the batting cage to work on his swing, injured Orioles shortstop Miguel Tejada walked through the visiting clubhouse at Safeco Field and said to nobody in particular, "I've never felt so happy in my life." A night after taking his first swings since going on the disabled list June 22 with a fracture in his left wrist, Tejada did more extensive work and pronounced himself pain-free and a little more than a week away from his return to the lineup.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 11, 1994
That Peter Angelos doesn't know a humpback liner from a delayed steal is no reflection on his lack of baseball knowledge. In this connection, it can be a prerequisite for making him the best franchise owner the Baltimore Orioles ever had. But, in truth, he doesn't have much to beat.Baltimore has, indeed, had its share of stiffs. It's amazing, in some ways, that the franchise is still standing.One previous owner, or rather the advertising whiz kids he employed, wanted to alter the dimensions of the field by enlarging the distance between first and third base.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | January 8, 1991
Outside, the seats were empty, with Opening Day still three months away. A snow blanket, getting thicker by the moment, covered the field at Memorial Stadium.But, under the right-field stands, Baltimore Orioles coach Elrod Hendricks was directing the first of thrice-weekly workouts that serve as a tuneup for spring training.Until the middle of February, the Orioles who live in the area will throw from indoor mounds and hit against a pitching machine in indoor cages."I was hoping for a good day so they [pitchers]
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
The Prince of the Air was the King of Swing for a day.Chicago Bulls star Michael Jordan had a couple of air balls. He had six fouls, no slams and only a few drives.But the drives were hits of more than 300 feet as Jordan earned $3,600 with his bat and a $5,000 bonus -- all of which goes to charity -- for winning the Celebrity Home Run Challenge yesterday at Camden Yards.Jordan was no Babe Ruth, but he was no Casey at his last at-bat, either."Wins. He always wins at everything," joked New York Knicks center Patrick Ewing, who along with Jordan, actors Jim Belushi, Tom Selleck and Bill Murray, Olympic sprint star Florence Griffith Joyner and former NFL wide receiver and NBC broadcaster Ahmad Rashad made up the celebrity field.
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