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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | December 14, 1992
The parents of a 4-year-old girl have filed suit against an Ellicott City man who owned a batting cage where the child was injured when she was struck in the face with a baseball bat.Claudia and Richard Holman of Abingdon claim that the previous owner of A&C Grand Slam Inc. in Woodlawn was negligent in permitting baseball bats to be swung outside of the batting cages.The couple's daughter, Kathleen Holman, received "serious, painful and permanent injuries" when she was hit by a bat swung by a teen-age boy on March 8, 1991, the suit says.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
No one will argue that the Orioles' offense could use a bit of a boost. Whether two men who joined them Thursday in batting practice could provide it is a different conversation entirely. Former Orioles Harold Reynolds and Brady Anderson were in full uniform yesterday before the Orioles' 3-1 loss to Houston, with Reynolds taking his hacks in the batting cage and trying to regain his late-80s All-Star form. Reynolds, now an MLB Network analyst, will broadcast today's Civil Rights Game in Houston.
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SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- When Charles Johnson moved his family last winter from Pembroke Pines to nearby Plantation, he didn't classify it as a career move. His 20-month-old son, Brandon, needed room to romp and Johnson wanted to provide him the freedom of an acre lot. It also enabled Johnson to install an outdoor batting cage and throw himself into a winter remodeling effort. Four or five times a week, Orioles batting practice pitcher Rudy Arias would drive from his Miami home to Plantation.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013
BOWIE -- Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold is set to bat third in the lineup for the Bowie Baysox at Prince George's Stadium later tonight, and you can be fairly confident that the hitting background here will bring back some good memories. The last time Reimold appeared in a game at this ballpark was Sept. 4, 2008, and it was quite a memorable occasion for him. He hit three home runs against the Akron Aeros and crushed a grand slam in his final at-bat of the game. “Gosh, I should just end on a good note," Reimold laughed.
NEWS
February 21, 1993
Baseball's All-Star Game in Baltimore is still 21 weeks away, but the preliminaries have begun.Between now and July, Baltimoreans and out-of-town visitors can get a realistic foretaste of things to come at a preview center that has opened at Camden Station. The Civil War era landmark's ground-floor waiting rooms now contain 4,000 square feet of exhibits about some of the most remarkable moments in baseball history.Displays are devoted to the history and development of Baltimore baseball since the 1870s, to Negro League players and, of course, to Babe Ruth and the nearby museum honoring the Baltimore-born legend.
FEATURES
September 16, 1998
My First Job!Do you have a summer job? Many famous athletes held other jobs before they became superstars!Brady Anderson center fielder, Baltimore Orioles"I worked at a batting cage in San Diego. I was a freshman in high school."I stood behind the cage wearing a batting helmet. When a customer was done hitting, I swept up the balls."I earned $16 for four hours of work. After my shift, I would spend $12 at the batting cage. The boss wouldn't let me hit for free!"Meet Teresa WeatherspoonGuard Teresa Weatherspoon of the New York Liberty is a showstopper!
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 1, 2007
WMAR-2 news anchor Jamie Costello isn't big on shopping. "My wife does a lot of the shopping. She loves Wegmans. If we're within 20 miles, we're going to Wegmans." Raised in Rosedale, Costello, 47, now lives in Towson with his wife, Donna, and two kids, Lauren, 14, and Matthew, 11. Though he's no shopaholic, Costello does have fond memories of the retailers he grew up visiting on Howard Street. "We used to go to Stewart's, Hochschild, Epstein's. ... The red dot sale at Hecht's used to be the best deal in town."
SPORTS
By Mike Littwin | October 1, 1990
It wasn't the ball that seemed so frightening as it came flying toward the plate. The prospect of swinging at the ball and missing it was what scared me.I don't know how fast the ball was propelled, only that it wasn't as fast as I would like it to be in the retelling. I can say this: I didn't swing and miss. I watched. I watched the ball all the way until it slammed into the back of the batting cage. This is what as known as not being able to pull the trigger. What I'm trying to say is, if it had been me firing at Archduke Ferdinand, no World War I.I waited for the next ball.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 19, 2008
The Orioles played a game before their game yesterday, using one of their back fields for a little simulated action that didn't lack for interesting -- and at times comical -- moments. Unable to arrange any split-squad games this spring, the Orioles set up a batting cage and had some of their pitchers, including Jeremy Guthrie and Garrett Olson, face a small group of hitters. Triple-A pitching coach Larry McCall and instructor Don Werner took turns serving as the plate umpire while standing behind the cage.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013
BOWIE -- Orioles outfielder Nolan Reimold is set to bat third in the lineup for the Bowie Baysox at Prince George's Stadium later tonight, and you can be fairly confident that the hitting background here will bring back some good memories. The last time Reimold appeared in a game at this ballpark was Sept. 4, 2008, and it was quite a memorable occasion for him. He hit three home runs against the Akron Aeros and crushed a grand slam in his final at-bat of the game. “Gosh, I should just end on a good note," Reimold laughed.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
Entering Sunday's series finale with Detroit, the Orioles bench had struggled throughout the year in contributing late in games, hitting just 1-for-18 in pinch-hit situations. But against the Tigers, the Orioles got their first pinch hit since May 20 when Danny Valencia knocked in the tying run on a single to right field off Tigers reliever Phil Coke in the seventh inning. “I knew he had good stuff,” Valencia said. “I actually saw both of his pitches. He threw me a fastball first pitch and a slider second pitch.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 19, 2008
The Orioles played a game before their game yesterday, using one of their back fields for a little simulated action that didn't lack for interesting -- and at times comical -- moments. Unable to arrange any split-squad games this spring, the Orioles set up a batting cage and had some of their pitchers, including Jeremy Guthrie and Garrett Olson, face a small group of hitters. Triple-A pitching coach Larry McCall and instructor Don Werner took turns serving as the plate umpire while standing behind the cage.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2007
SEATTLE -- After taking ground balls for 20 minutes and then proceeding to the batting cage to work on his swing, injured Orioles shortstop Miguel Tejada walked through the visiting clubhouse at Safeco Field and said to nobody in particular, "I've never felt so happy in my life." A night after taking his first swings since going on the disabled list June 22 with a fracture in his left wrist, Tejada did more extensive work and pronounced himself pain-free and a little more than a week away from his return to the lineup.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 1, 2007
WMAR-2 news anchor Jamie Costello isn't big on shopping. "My wife does a lot of the shopping. She loves Wegmans. If we're within 20 miles, we're going to Wegmans." Raised in Rosedale, Costello, 47, now lives in Towson with his wife, Donna, and two kids, Lauren, 14, and Matthew, 11. Though he's no shopaholic, Costello does have fond memories of the retailers he grew up visiting on Howard Street. "We used to go to Stewart's, Hochschild, Epstein's. ... The red dot sale at Hecht's used to be the best deal in town."
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.-- --The seven-letter word keeps resurfacing in the life and baseball times of Aubrey Huff. Without. Huff, the Orioles' new middle-of-the-lineup slugger, graduated from a Texas high school without being drafted and without getting any serious looks from Division I colleges. In his first seven seasons in the majors, Huff hit 141 homers without fanfare because he played primarily in the obscurity of Tampa Bay, a place without baseball tradition, without a consistent fan base.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | April 16, 2006
It's nice to know that some players are reading this blog, though it can get a little uncomfortable at times. Melvin Mora apparently didn't appreciate my reference on Friday to Tony Batista possibly being in his ear again and imploring him to hit home runs. I didn't say it was happening. I just hoped that Mora, in his contract year, wasn't going to start swinging for the fences each time he stepped to the plate. Mora made sure to point out to me yesterday that he isn't Tony Batista. He passed along the message through a co-worker.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
When David Segui has a bad game, he doesn't take it home with him, he takes it to his office.In this case, that office can be found in the privacy of the Orioles' batting cage under the stands at Camden Yards.And there, Segui will hit, and hit, and hit some more, until he is satisfied he has solved his problem.It is the price Segui, 25, happily pays for his role with the Orioles. He is, after all, a role player -- part-time first baseman, part-time outfielder and full-time worker.It is not unusual, Segui says, for him to be working on his swing in the batting cage as late as 1 o'clock in the morning.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | April 16, 2006
It's nice to know that some players are reading this blog, though it can get a little uncomfortable at times. Melvin Mora apparently didn't appreciate my reference on Friday to Tony Batista possibly being in his ear again and imploring him to hit home runs. I didn't say it was happening. I just hoped that Mora, in his contract year, wasn't going to start swinging for the fences each time he stepped to the plate. Mora made sure to point out to me yesterday that he isn't Tony Batista. He passed along the message through a co-worker.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2004
With less than a month to go before the opening ceremony, lots of folks are tweaking their performances and putting on their Games faces. Like, for example, Leilani Okuda. She's working out in the batting cage. Checking her form in a full-length mirror. Practicing martial arts and Zen meditation. And hoping to stay anonymous once she reaches Athens. Okuda, a Honolulu native, is one of 12 softball umpires - six men and six women - who will officiate the 32 games from Aug. 14-23. "If you do the job right, no one remembers your name," she says.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - At 10 minutes past noon yesterday, longtime Orioles bullpen coach Elrod Hendricks steered his golf cart into position at Fort Lauderdale Stadium and sounded the air horn. Within moments, the key components of a vastly improved Orioles infield were in place together for the first time, going through the first cadences of a long season. Orioles bench coach Sam Perlozzo took a knee behind the pitcher's mound and tossed grounders to $72 million shortstop Miguel Tejada, who quickly fed the balls to a rotating quartet of second basemen that included two friends fighting for the starting job: Jerry Hairston and Brian Roberts.
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