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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Meet Shane Battier, Duke's "defensive stopper."At 6 feet 8 and a broad-shouldered, sculpted 220 pounds, he is the rare player who specializes both in blocking shots and taking charges. (His 33 charges this season set a Duke record; his 53 blocked shots are the ninth best in Duke history.)A sophomore religion major from Birmingham, Mich., Battier is enthused by his studies of China's Shaolin monks -- or as he put it, "I'm intrigued by their whole dogma.""How do you spell that order of monks?"
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
Nearly two months ago at the annual preseason gathering of Atlantic Coast Conference coaches and select players in Greensboro, N.C., Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski pondered a question about the loss of Shane Battier, and how that would affect Duke's chemistry as the Blue Devils defended their third national title. "The biggest question I have about this team is how are we going to be led?" Krzyzewski said. "I've never had a leader like Shane [now in the NBA with the Memphis Grizzlies]. Anybody that tries to be as good a leader as Shane is going to fail."
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2001
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- Top-seeded Duke opened the door for ninth-seeded Missouri several times in yesterday's second-round game of the NCAA tournament East Regional at Greensboro Coliseum. It took All-Americans Jason Williams and Shane Battier to finally slam it shut. After the Tigers built a lead and some confidence early in the game, after Duke's own 15-point lead late in the first half was cut to six at halftime and to one with 10 1/2 minutes left, the Blue Devils turned to Williams and Battier.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
MEMPHIS, Tenn. - Shane Battier has long had the ability to morph into the kind of player his team needed him to become. As a senior in high school outside Detroit, Battier suddenly showed he could score. As a freshman at Duke, he launched his reputation as a defensive stopper; by his junior year, he was the team's unquestioned leader. So what Battier has done as an NBA rookie for the Memphis Grizzlies shouldn't be that surprising. The Grizzlies, a team that won 23 games during the final season of a six-year stay in Vancouver, needed a lot of everything when they moved here.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS -- By the end, it was the All-Americans -- senior forward Shane Battier and sophomore point guard Jason Williams -- who rose to the occasion with their Duke teammates following. And it was really nothing new. A slow start didn't deter Battier or Williams, who shared the lead role that brought the Blue Devils back from a 22-point first-half deficit for a 95-84 win over Maryland that will send Duke to its ninth national championship game against Arizona tomorrow night. Struggling to find their offense early, Battier scored most of his 10 first-half points just before halftime and then took off in the second half.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2000
It wasn't as classic as previous North Carolina-Duke clashes, but Blue Devils Shane Battier and Chris Carrawell couldn't care less. In his final game at Cameron Indoor Stadium, Carrawell overcame emotion for 21 points and seven rebounds but was upstaged by junior Battier, who scored 30 points to lead the No. 4 Blue Devils to a 90-76 victory in Durham, N.C. "Shane was unbelievable and he carried us out there," Carrawell said. "I'm so thankful that the guys wouldn't let me lose today." Losing was never really an option for the Devils (24-4, 15-1 Atlantic Coast Conference)
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS -- The great players take their games to another level when championships are on the line, and that was the major difference between Duke and Maryland last night in an NCAA Final Four game at the Metrodome. It wasn't any difference between Maryland coach Gary Williams and Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski. Or any hot vs. cold strategy. Duke has two great players in forward Shane Battier and guard Jason Williams. Maryland has a bunch of good players, great depth, but no one yet in the caliber of either Battier or Williams.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - UCLA had many answers for Duke last night. The Bruins put Dan Gadzurik on Shane Battier and the All-American forward had trouble shooting over the 6-11 center's long arms. The Blue Devils didn't go on any of their psyche-crushing, game-deciding runs. Only one problem. UCLA is still trying to figure out what to do with Jason Williams, something the Bruins will have to ponder until next season and something their Pac-10 neighbors, Southern Cal, will have to answer when the Trojans meet the Blue Devils tomorrow in the NCAA East Regional final.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Arizona and Duke started the college basketball season as the two best teams in the country, and they will end up that way tonight when the Wildcats meet the Blue Devils in the NCAA tournament championship game at the Metrodome. But the burning questions surrounding these two blue-chip teams have to do with forces beyond their control. Will divine intervention take over for Arizona, or will some other type of intervention take over for Duke? There was a sense of both happening in Saturday's semifinals.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2000
COLLEGE PARK -- For any team that believed it could dominate Duke inside, the Blue Devils rejected that theory yesterday. After giving up 100 points to Virginia four days ago, the Duke players invested a lot of pride in their interior defense and received high-reaching dividends, swatting away a season-best 12 shots against Maryland, the Atlantic Coast Conference's top shot-blocking team. The Blue Devils clamped down on Maryland's best post players, Terence Morris and Lonny Baxter, who combined for a season-worst 13-for-38 performance from the field.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - After he'd coached Duke to its third national championship Monday night, Mike Krzyzewski rejected the notion that Shane Battier's departure - and the possibility of Jason Williams leaving early - marked an end of an era for the Blue Devils' program, which had been in two Final Fours in the past three years. "Our program is not an era program," said Krzyzewski, whose team got 18 second-half points from Mike Dunleavy Jr. to beat Arizona, 82-72. "We've been pretty good year after year.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Arizona and Duke started the college basketball season as the two best teams in the country, and they will end up that way tonight when the Wildcats meet the Blue Devils in the NCAA tournament championship game at the Metrodome. But the burning questions surrounding these two blue-chip teams have to do with forces beyond their control. Will divine intervention take over for Arizona, or will some other type of intervention take over for Duke? There was a sense of both happening in Saturday's semifinals.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 2, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Basketball at the University of Maryland should not be ending, but just beginning. Maryland fans may not find consolation in blowing a 22-point, first-half lead and then losing to Duke, 95-84, in a national semifinal Saturday night at the Metrodome, but maybe a reality check is needed. Take a deep breath. Hold it. Exhale. Drink a little water and then remember that Maryland never developed into the UCLA of the East that Lefty Driesell once promised. Now, keep enjoying the ride.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS -- The great players take their games to another level when championships are on the line, and that was the major difference between Duke and Maryland last night in an NCAA Final Four game at the Metrodome. It wasn't any difference between Maryland coach Gary Williams and Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski. Or any hot vs. cold strategy. Duke has two great players in forward Shane Battier and guard Jason Williams. Maryland has a bunch of good players, great depth, but no one yet in the caliber of either Battier or Williams.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS -- By the end, it was the All-Americans -- senior forward Shane Battier and sophomore point guard Jason Williams -- who rose to the occasion with their Duke teammates following. And it was really nothing new. A slow start didn't deter Battier or Williams, who shared the lead role that brought the Blue Devils back from a 22-point first-half deficit for a 95-84 win over Maryland that will send Duke to its ninth national championship game against Arizona tomorrow night. Struggling to find their offense early, Battier scored most of his 10 first-half points just before halftime and then took off in the second half.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - The prime-time players showed up once again for Duke, Maryland's leading scorers fell silent in the second half, and the Terps watched their parade of big men disappear in a barrage of fouls. That equation combined to halt a magical run last night by the Terps, whose first trip to the Final Four in school history ended in disappointment with a 95-84 loss to Duke, in a contest that basically was a tale of two distinct halves. Duke, which will face Arizona in tomorrow night's championship game, will go for its third national title, all under coach Mike Krzyzewski.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | April 2, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Basketball at the University of Maryland should not be ending, but just beginning. Maryland fans may not find consolation in blowing a 22-point, first-half lead and then losing to Duke, 95-84, in a national semifinal Saturday night at the Metrodome, but maybe a reality check is needed. Take a deep breath. Hold it. Exhale. Drink a little water and then remember that Maryland never developed into the UCLA of the East that Lefty Driesell once promised. Now, keep enjoying the ride.
SPORTS
By Sam Borden and Sam Borden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - In 1998, North Carolina center Brendan Haywood was just a freshman when he missed two free throws in the closing seconds of a two-point loss to Duke. Last night, in the latest edition of this rivalry, Haywood showed just how far he has come. The 7-foot senior center had ice in his veins with 1.2 seconds left as he stroked two free throws to give the fourth-ranked Tar Heels an 85-83 victory over No. 2 Duke at Cameron Indoor Stadium. Haywood was sent to the free-throw line when referee Mike Wood called a foul on Duke senior Shane Battier as the Blue Devils' tri-captain tried to steal a full-court pass and collided with the Tar Heels' center.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - Maryland and Duke showed the country last night why their rivalry was the most competitive and compelling in college basketball this season. Unfortunately for the Terrapins, the Blue Devils also demonstrated why they have been so successful in the Final Four. Maryland shocked Duke by taking a 22-point lead in the first 11 minutes, only to watch its Atlantic Coast Conference opponent and longtime nemesis storm back amid a flurry of clutch shots and questionable calls that resulted in a 95-84 victory for the Blue Devils.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 31, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - The Atlantic Coast Conference swept yesterday's Associated Press National Coach and Player of the Year awards, as North Carolina's Matt Doherty and Duke's Shane Battier were given the respective honors. It marked the first time since 1979 that a conference won both awards. That year they were won by coach Bill Hodges and senior forward Larry Bird of Indiana State. "It's a proud moment to be recognized this way," said Doherty, who became the first ACC coach to win a share of the title in his first season.
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