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By AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE | April 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - A battalion of the new Iraqi army refused to go to Fallujah last week to support U.S. Marines battling Muslim insurgents for control of the city, the commander of coalition ground troops in Iraq confirmed yesterday. Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, speaking on NBC's Meet The Press, said the incident revealed "challenges" within Iraq's security forces as the United States looks to hand power back to the Iraqis on June 30. "That one instance did, in fact, uncover some significant challenges in some of the Iraqi security force structures," Sanchez said.
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By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
A Baltimore Fire Department battalion chief responding to an apartment fire was critically injured Sunday evening in a three-car crash that left four other motorists injured, authorities said. The battalion chief was at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in critical condition after being injured in the accident at Cold Spring Lane and Loch Raven Boulevard, officials said. His department SUV was hit as he was responding to a fire in the 6400 block of Walther Ave. just before 6 p.m. Four civilian motorists were taken to area hospitals with non-life-threatening injuries, Fire Department spokesman Ian Brennan said.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A Maryland National Guard battalion based in Dundalk is being mobilized for active duty to serve as a security force at military airbases in Maryland. The 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment, will begin the formal mobilization process Jan. 30. More than 300 personnel will be activated into federal service for approximately a year as part of Operation Noble Eagle, a homeland defense effort, a Guard spokesman said yesterday. Members of the unit will be assigned to Andrews Air Force Base near Washington, and to Martin State Airport in Middle River.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A former Howard County fire officer is suing in federal court to get his job back, alleging that the county violated his rights by firing him for personal Facebook discussions about gun control, free speech and "liberal" politics. Former Battalion Chief Kevin P. Buker, who worked for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services from 1997 until he was let go in March, contends that the county violated his First Amendment rights by prohibiting speech on public issues that did not interfere with his job performance.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Leo Valladares, a Honduran human rights investigator, said yesterday that a Honduran military commander, Gen. Luis Discua, told him in late 1993 that at the request of the CIA he created a Honduran military unit found to have kidnapped, tortured and murdered suspected subversives in the 1980s.At a meeting at the presidential palace in Tegucigalpa, Valladares said, Discua "held up a file [and] said: 'If I created Battalion 316, it's because I was asked to do so by the CIA.' "Valladares was testifying before a congressional committee on legislation that would speed the declassification of material requested by Latin American and Caribbean "truth commissions" that seek to uncover Cold War misdeeds by military leaders.
NEWS
September 14, 2004
More than 50 members of the 1297th Support Battalion of the Maryland National Guard are scheduled to leave their home station in Havre de Grace this morning for a tour of duty in Iraq. Maj. Charles Kohler, a National Guard public affairs officer, said the guardsmen first will be taken to Fort Drum, N.Y., where they will receive training and equipment. The unit is scheduled to be activated for 18 months.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
When the 519th Military Police Battalion moves out of Fort Meade forever in just a few weeks, chances are, most people won't notice.The Dunkin' Donuts across Route 175 still will sell a lot of doughnuts, and the Hardee's next door a lot of burgers. Bill's Cleaners won't run out of shirts to clean, and Lackwell's Garage won't run out of cars to repair.After all, the battalion -- which has deployed MPs to Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Storm and Panama for Operation Just Cause -- now numbers about 150 soldiers on a base with more than 11,000 military personnel and some 28,000 civilian employees.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | October 16, 1990
An Army medical unit from Fort Meade flew out of Andrews Air Force Base today, bound for Saudi Arabia, leaving the fort in Anne Arundel County with only one of its three active duty battalions still on base.Fort Meade spokesman Don McClow said the 85th Medical Battalion was ordered yesterday afternoon to board a bus for Andrews Air Force Base by 2 a.m. today.An Air Force spokesman at Andrews said the battalion then boarded a flight at Andrews and took off at 7:20 a.m. today to join the Desert Shield operation in Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1997
As the Army prepares to release a report critical of commanders in the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal, the leader of a corrupted training battalion at the post has been suspended from his command.Lt. Col. Martin T. Utzig, a 20-year Army officer, was suspended Friday as commander of a battalion where seven drill sergeants -- including convicted rapist Delmar G. Simpson -- were charged with criminal sexual misconduct involving female trainees.Utzig's suspension, confirmed yesterday by a base spokesman, was ordered by the general in charge of the Army's training program and comes shortly before the Army's Inspector General is expected to release a report detailing the "command environment" at Aberdeen.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Gilbert Lewthwaite and Ginger Thompson and Gilbert Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The CIA's inspector general has taken over an on-again, off-again investigation into the agency's relationship with a Honduran military unit that tortured and killed hundreds of men and women during the 1980s.CIA spokesman Mark Mansfield said yesterday that the inspector general has taken over a review that began 18 months ago of the CIA's involvement with the unit, known as Battalion 316, but that he may need "several months, at least," to complete his report.The initial investigation, authorized by Director of Central Intelligence John M. Deutch and assigned to a special "Honduran Working Group," was completed in August, and some of its findings were presented to the Senate Select Intelligence Committee, Mansfield said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
As the wife of an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel, Cheri Fish says she and her family have changed residences 10 times in 10 years. She knows another move is in store when her husband says, "We need to talk. " Fish knows Army life can be hard on families who might not call any one place home for long. But she hopes members of the Fort Meade-based 3rd Training Support Battalion, 312 Regiment will remember that they can look back to Maryland for support. Her husband, Lt. Col. Calvin E. Fish, is commander for the battalion, which on Sunday held its Family Day event at Blob's Park in Jessup.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 5, 2011
Dr. Herbert Leonard Warres, a World War II combat surgeon who later became a radiologist and headed the outpatient radiology department at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center, died Wednesday at North Oaks retirement community in Pikesville. He was 99. The son of a dress factory owner and a homemaker, Dr. Warres, who never used his first name, was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated in 1928 from Boys High School. "He was so ill in his early childhood that his name was changed to confuse Death — a strategy that served him well for nearly a century — through two invasions, numerous battles, two cancers, and a subdural hematoma," said a son, Dr. Stephen Warres, a child psychiatrist who lives in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Aegis staff report | May 27, 2011
Seventy-eight members of the Maryland Army National Guard's 1297th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion based in Havre de Grace said farewell to friends and family at a deployment ceremony Sunday at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The soldiers are shipping out to Fort Hood, Texas, for training and then to Afghanistan where they will support Operation Enduring Freedom for approximately a year, according to the MNG. Joining the unit and family members and other well-wishers at Sunday's ceremony were Gov. Martin O'Malley and Maj. Gen. James A. Adkins, adjutant general of Maryland, who both spoke.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2010
For Susan Sellner of Columbia, what might have been a weekend of shopping and holiday preparations was instead a time to send her 24-year-old daughter off to war in Afghanistan. Sellner, 56, was part of a small crowd of family members and loved ones who gathered in Baltimore Sunday morning to say goodbye to 40 members of the U.S. Army's 203rd Military Intelligence Battalion, which is mobilizing for deployment to Afghanistan and Iraq next month. "I was real proud of her for wanting to sign up," Sellner said of her daughter, Spec.
NEWS
August 31, 2008
Marylanders to help out with hurricane response 1 Members of the Maryland Army National Guard and Baltimore firefighters were part of a team that departed yesterday for Louisiana as the Gulf Coast braced for Hurricane Gustav. At the request of Louisiana officials, Gov. Martin O'Malley sent a crew of eight soldiers and a CH-47 cargo helicopter to help with search-and-rescue missions, movement of evacuees and supplies, and sandbagging of levee breaches, according to Lt. Col. Charles Kohler, a spokesman for the Air Guard.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
WASHINGTON - In a decision reflecting the shortage of available combat troops, more than 2,000 Marines fighting the Taliban will be kept in Afghanistan 30 days beyond their original seven-month tour, the Marine Corps said yesterday. The decision by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates to extend the Marines' tour was confirmed a day after Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that more troops are needed in Afghanistan but that he didn't have more troops to send. Gates had said several times in recent months that he had "no plans" to extend the Marines' tour.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1997
Howard County's only National Guard unit -- which assisted residents in digging out after the blizzards of 1993 and 1996 -- was scheduled to close this year, a victim of military cutbacks. But the unit has been spared.The survival of the Maryland Army National Guard 121st Engineer Battalion means that its 50-year-old armory, on a prime piece of property for development across from the new Long Gate shopping center, isn't likely to be sold off.And it means that the Guard unit will stay around to help the county in emergencies, as it did during Hurricane Agnes in 1972 and the blizzards,To survive, the 79-year-old battalion -- which distinguished itself during the Normandy invasion in World War II -- had to make its own cutbacks and reorganize.
NEWS
By GINGER THOMPSON and GINGER THOMPSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 17, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- The most talked about issue on this country's popular Radio America call-in show these days is the investigation of 10 military officers accused of human rights abuses during the 1980s, when a CIA-trained military unit called Battalion 316 was kidnapping, torturing and murdering suspected subversives.Carlos Lopez Osorio, lead attorney for the accused officers, calls in. "My clients should be pardoned!" he insists, invoking a 1991 amnesty decree that pardons political crimes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 6, 2008
Thomas Joseph Baginski, a retired Baltimore City Fire Department battalion chief whose career spanned 41 years, died of cancer March 30 at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Parkville resident was 72. Mr. Baginski, who was born and raised in Baltimore, was a 1953 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School, where he played varsity football. He served in the Army for several years before joining the Fire Department in 1958. He was promoted to pump operator and lieutenant in 1964, and captain six years later.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon | February 20, 2008
Battalion Chief Charles T. King Jr. of the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services has been given the National Gold Medal Award for Emergency Medical Technicians, the county executive's office announced last week. The award, from the Veterans of Foreign Wars, recognizes one EMT from around the nation each year for such qualities as experience, training, accomplishments and community service. "I want to thank the VFW for recognizing the important work of emergency medical service providers and for selecting me for this honor," King said in a statement.
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