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Batman Returns

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By Los Angeles Daily News | June 24, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- So who's left to see it next weekend?"Batman Returns," unsurprisingly, swooped into theaters and soared to a box-office record -- $47.7 million, including $2 million for Thursday night sneak previews, for a whopping $18,049 per-screen average. That was half of all the money spent by moviegoers over the weekend.The reception at Warner Bros., which distributed the film, was understandably jubilant. "I was basically one of the more optimistic people around here, and I was looking at $44 million," said Barry Reardon, president of domestic distribution for Warner Bros.
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By TIM SWIFT | September 30, 2008
(Warner Bros. Interactive) For Microsoft Windows, PlayStations 2 and 3, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo DS, Nintendo Wii and Xbox 360. One to two players. Rated E for players 10 and older for cartoon violence. Retail price $49.99. *** game This summer's box-office champ, The Dark Knight, was unleashed with all the merchandising force befitting its mega-blockbuster status. But amid all the Batman action figures and lunchboxes there was one notable omission - a video game. We're still waiting, but for now, Lego Batman: The Videogame will have to suffice.
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By Betsy Sharkey and Betsy Sharkey,New York Times News Service | June 14, 1992
Los Angeles Bo Welch began carving out a design for the film "Batman Returns" with a piece of cardboard and images of Fascist sculpture and Depression-era machine-age art churning through his mind.His first rough model was of Gotham Plaza, a bleakly futuristic and oppressively urban sendup of Rockefeller Center. The model was to provide the graphic thread for the film, the sequel to the 1989 blockbuster "Batman.""It was just a cardboard model that I hacked together, very crude and sculptural, but I knew I was on my way," says Mr. Welch, 40."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1997
Tonight: a few premieres and the return of the Caped Crusader."Boatworks" (5: 30 p.m.-6 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Robert Urich is host for this new 13-part series from MPT focusing on the myriad types of boats that ply the world's waterways. Tonight's kick-off looks at a classic mahogany runabout on Lake Tahoe, lifesaving boats along the Jersey coast and canoe-like vessels used to harvest wild rice in Minnesota. Boat lovers should enjoy the show, while others may find it all a little too hobby-oriented, although the segment on rice boats offers an interesting look at a vanishing culture.
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By Stephen Hunter | June 18, 1992
"Batman Returns" is the Big One for the summer. Michael Keaton stars with newcomers Danny DeVito as Penguin and Michelle Pfeiffer as the Catwoman. The movie is big, dark, expensive and, unless it's a total doggie, will make yet another fortune. Rated PG-13.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 27, 1992
"Batman Returns," Warner Bros.' mega-sequel (rumored cost: million), doesn't open until June 19, but already the bat-hype and marketing tie-ins have begun.The follow-up to Tim Burton's 1989 release, the sixth-highest-grossing picture of all time, is considered the movie to beat in the summer box-office race, and the trailer has been wowing audiences with its turbo-charged action sequences, the virtually unrecognizable Danny De Vito in a Penguin get-up, and Michael Keaton and Michelle Pfeiffer's French-kissing-in-funny-costumes scene.
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By Dallas Morning News | August 11, 1992
People who can't name the U.S. secretary of state or locate Florida on a map can tell you exactly what they think Pee-wee Herman was doing on the evening of Friday, July 26, 1991, in a porno house in Sarasota, Fla. Some will even remember the name of the theater and what it was showing the day Pee-wee, alias Paul Reubens, was arrested there. (Answers: the South Trail Cinema; "Nancy Nurse," "Turn Up the Heat" and "Tiger Shark.")When the news hit, the TV and movie star's own lawyer pronounced his career dead -- proof that even Hollywood lawyers don't know everything.
NEWS
By TIM SWIFT | September 30, 2008
(Warner Bros. Interactive) For Microsoft Windows, PlayStations 2 and 3, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo DS, Nintendo Wii and Xbox 360. One to two players. Rated E for players 10 and older for cartoon violence. Retail price $49.99. *** game This summer's box-office champ, The Dark Knight, was unleashed with all the merchandising force befitting its mega-blockbuster status. But amid all the Batman action figures and lunchboxes there was one notable omission - a video game. We're still waiting, but for now, Lego Batman: The Videogame will have to suffice.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 2, 1992
East Hampton, New York. -- I walked out of ''Batman Returns'' an angry man, thinking, a bit irrationally, about what a jerk Dan Quayle is. Our boy vice president thinks the country is in trouble because of its dread ''cultural elite.''Wrong, Hoosier; we're in trouble because we don't have a cultural elite.If there were such an elite, it would be someplace around here. They're all on the beach or in the woods or pawing the kiwis and endive at ''The Barefoot Contessa.'' On the weekend, a lot of the men and women who write the songs and books and make the movies the whole world sings, reads and sees were at the six-screener on Main Street paying seven bucks a head to expose their children to what the nation's film critics assured us is high art.Art or not, ''Batman Returns'' is obscure, boring, violent -- and sick.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1997
Tonight: a few premieres and the return of the Caped Crusader."Boatworks" (5: 30 p.m.-6 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Robert Urich is host for this new 13-part series from MPT focusing on the myriad types of boats that ply the world's waterways. Tonight's kick-off looks at a classic mahogany runabout on Lake Tahoe, lifesaving boats along the Jersey coast and canoe-like vessels used to harvest wild rice in Minnesota. Boat lovers should enjoy the show, while others may find it all a little too hobby-oriented, although the segment on rice boats offers an interesting look at a vanishing culture.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1996
If you watch "Batman" on NBC tonight, keep this in mind: Adam West, who played the bat-guy in the '60s television series, really believes he should have starred in this film. Just try to imagine him in the role."Cosby" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- In a repeat from last month, Hilton has to explain to his wife why there's a nude woman in the bathroom. Good luck. CBS."Dangerous Minds" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Superteacher Louanne grapples with whether to tell James that he'll never make the basketball team a particularly galling situation, given that James has been working extra hard to pull up his grades and make himself eligible for the squad.
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By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,Chicago Tribune | January 28, 1993
Twenty-five years ago, one of the major specialties of the Hollywood studios was the stately, tasteful adaptation of a literary work, drawn from a best seller ("The Godfather"), from the stage ("The Lion in Winter") or from the classics reading list ("The Great Gatsby").It was left to the grungy independent outfits, like American-International, New World or Crown, to feed the drive-ins with exploitation films, horror movies and shoot-'em-ups.Today, that relationship has been almost completely reversed.
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By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,Chicago Tribune | January 28, 1993
Twenty-five years ago, one of the major specialties of the Hollywood studios was the stately, tasteful adaptation of a literary work, drawn from a best seller ("The Godfather"), from the stage ("The Lion in Winter") or from the classics reading list ("The Great Gatsby").It was left to the grungy independent outfits, like American-International, New World or Crown, to feed the drive-ins with exploitation films, horror movies and shoot-'em-ups.Today, that relationship has been almost completely reversed.
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By Dallas Morning News | August 11, 1992
People who can't name the U.S. secretary of state or locate Florida on a map can tell you exactly what they think Pee-wee Herman was doing on the evening of Friday, July 26, 1991, in a porno house in Sarasota, Fla. Some will even remember the name of the theater and what it was showing the day Pee-wee, alias Paul Reubens, was arrested there. (Answers: the South Trail Cinema; "Nancy Nurse," "Turn Up the Heat" and "Tiger Shark.")When the news hit, the TV and movie star's own lawyer pronounced his career dead -- proof that even Hollywood lawyers don't know everything.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
Angry ParentI became angry reading Richard Reeves' column about taking his 7-year-old to see "Batman Returns." It seemed as if he knew he was to blame, yet couldn't freely admit this as he blamed McDonald's, the need for a common culture, etc.I, too, have a 7-year-old daughter and I am not going to allow her to do things that will harm her. She has been known to plead incessantly to be allowed to cross a busy street alone -- so, I must be steadfast in...
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 2, 1992
East Hampton, New York. -- I walked out of ''Batman Returns'' an angry man, thinking, a bit irrationally, about what a jerk Dan Quayle is. Our boy vice president thinks the country is in trouble because of its dread ''cultural elite.''Wrong, Hoosier; we're in trouble because we don't have a cultural elite.If there were such an elite, it would be someplace around here. They're all on the beach or in the woods or pawing the kiwis and endive at ''The Barefoot Contessa.'' On the weekend, a lot of the men and women who write the songs and books and make the movies the whole world sings, reads and sees were at the six-screener on Main Street paying seven bucks a head to expose their children to what the nation's film critics assured us is high art.Art or not, ''Batman Returns'' is obscure, boring, violent -- and sick.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 21, 1992
Always a godmother," laments Fran Liebowitz somewhere in her intermittent oeuvre, "and never a god."Gender adjusted appropriately, it's a cry that many of us have uttered in the secrecy of our minds. And the movies understand that with a commercial zeal.Godhood -- at least in the secular sense of the power of omnipotence and invulnerability, the sense of bringing terrible justice to the world, the sense of having a really great body without working out -- is at the very heart of popular culture, particularly in fantasies of omnipotent males -- "Batman Returns" is only the most recent example -- that the movies have made fortunes exploiting.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
Angry ParentI became angry reading Richard Reeves' column about taking his 7-year-old to see "Batman Returns." It seemed as if he knew he was to blame, yet couldn't freely admit this as he blamed McDonald's, the need for a common culture, etc.I, too, have a 7-year-old daughter and I am not going to allow her to do things that will harm her. She has been known to plead incessantly to be allowed to cross a busy street alone -- so, I must be steadfast in...
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 28, 1992
It was an irony almost too trivial to be noticed. But there's no such thing as an irony too trivial for a movie critic, so I couldn't help noticing that exactly as "Batman Returns" was opening and raking in over $47 million in three days, so too, at least in Baltimore, was another film that once boasted a frenzy of hype and high expectations. It may have made $47.This was "Brenda Starr," the Brooke Shields starring vehicle of five years ago, which, for obscure reasons, snuck on little cat's feet into a single venue in a suburban multiplex, unsupported by a single advertisement.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 25, 1992
Now that another slick "Batman" movie is packing them into the theaters again, video shoppers will find plenty of bat-related artifacts competing for their attention in stores.One of the most prominent is likely to be GoodTimes Home Video's two volumes of "Batman and Robin," containing the 15 chapter serial released by Columbia Pictures in 1949. Each volume is priced at $9.99 and runs about 120 minutes.Hollywood has become so adept at jazzing up comic book heroes with special effects that the creaky conventions of yesteryear would bore even a 5-year-old.
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