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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Asledgehammer-subtle reworking of Batman's "origin" story, Batman Begins is industrial strength, from the props to the sound. It'll clear the wax out of your ears, but it won't deliver anything piquant to your brain. At a solemn 140 minutes, it tests your tailbone more often than it tickles your funny bone. Director Christopher Nolan, the accomplished yet sober-sided young director who caused an (undeserved) sensation with his jigsaw-puzzle cult thriller Memento (2001), adopts a new motto for his pre-sold blockbuster: "We will leave no viewer behind."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [Pollstar, Exhibitor Relations Co., Nielsen and Billboard magazine] | July 31, 2008
Television 1. America's Got Talent, NBC 2. Wipeout, ABC 3. Two and a Half Men, CBS 4. 60 Minutes, CBS 5. So You Think You Can Dance, Fox FILM 1. The Dark Knight, Warner Bros. 2. Step Brothers, Columbia 3. Mamma Mia! , Universal 4. The X-Files, Fox 5. Journey to the Center of the Earth, New Line SINGLES 1. "I Kissed a Girl," Katy Perry 2. "Take a Bow," Rihanna 3. "Forever," Chris Brown 4. "Lollipop," Lil Wayne 5. "Viva La Vida," Coldplay ALBUMS 1. Untitled, Nas 2. Tha Carter III, Lil Wayne 3. Mamma Mia!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [Pollstar, Exhibitor Relations Co., Nielsen and Billboard magazine] | July 31, 2008
Television 1. America's Got Talent, NBC 2. Wipeout, ABC 3. Two and a Half Men, CBS 4. 60 Minutes, CBS 5. So You Think You Can Dance, Fox FILM 1. The Dark Knight, Warner Bros. 2. Step Brothers, Columbia 3. Mamma Mia! , Universal 4. The X-Files, Fox 5. Journey to the Center of the Earth, New Line SINGLES 1. "I Kissed a Girl," Katy Perry 2. "Take a Bow," Rihanna 3. "Forever," Chris Brown 4. "Lollipop," Lil Wayne 5. "Viva La Vida," Coldplay ALBUMS 1. Untitled, Nas 2. Tha Carter III, Lil Wayne 3. Mamma Mia!
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 21, 2008
Harry Potter, give your Hogwarts robes a rest. Spider-Man, hang up your spidey-suit. There's a new box-office savior in town from the world of fantasy fiction, and he wears a cape and cowl. Beating the reigning champ Spider-Man 3, The Dark Knight set box-office records this weekend, bringing in a more than $155 million from the widest opening ever - 4,366 theaters. Hollywood was abuzz after opening day, when the movie set a record by raking in $67.85 million. "We knew it would be big, but we never expected to dominate the marketplace like we did," said Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - For 10 minutes, the reporters behaved. Here to interview Katie Holmes and Michael Caine, they asked dutiful questions about their new film, Batman Begins. Holmes offered the usual pat answers. "It was such a thrill to be a part of this cast," she gushed. "It was great working with Christian [Bale, as Batman]. He's such a professional and very dedicated." Oh, tell us more! Everyone, of course, really wanted to ask Holmes about her boyfriend, mega-star Tom Cruise, who has not exactly been shy about declaring his love for her. But would Holmes explode at such questions and storm out of the room?
FEATURES
By R. Kinsey Lowe and R. Kinsey Lowe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Batman Begins swooped into theaters Wednesday with a solid $15.07 million, including just-after-midnight shows, Warner Bros. reported yesterday. While the Christopher Nolan film on which the studio has pinned hopes of resurrecting the franchise did not set any daily records - the biggest Wednesday opening belongs to Spider-Man 2 with $40.4 million - it was very good, and many in the industry expect the film's opening weekend to surpass that of the previous four Batmans. It also illustrates how much the movie business has changed as it has grown - with films opening in more theaters, delivering bigger grosses faster.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - This Batmobile is for real. It was parked outside the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel the other day, looking like the mutant spawn of a Lamborghini and a Hummer with its low profile and fat monster truck tires. You could reach beyond the red velvet rope and touch it - a palpable object, at last, in a summer movie season packed with digital effects (see: Star Wars). For Batman Begins, the $150 million film that brings the Dark Knight back to the big screen tomorrow, Warner Bros.
FEATURES
July 5, 2005
LOS ANGELES - War of the Worlds conquered the box office as easily as the movie's aliens overpowered Earth, but it did not have enough firepower to overcome Hollywood's prolongued box office slump. Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise's sci-fi tale took in $77.6 million over the long Fourth of July weekend, lifting its total since debuting Wednesday to $113.3 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. That fell well short of the all-time high held by Spider-Man 2, whose $180.1 million haul in its first six days led Hollywood to a record Fourth of July weekend last year.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
Theater The Taming of the Shrew : 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 3. Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $15-$25. Call 410-366-8594 or go to baltimore shakespeare.org. Talk about a Dream Team. For the Bard's classic, comic battle of the sexes, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has signed on some of the area's top acting talent. James Kinstle, the festival's former artistic director and a gifted comic actor, will play the role of the hyper-macho Petruchio.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Batman begins? Hardly. Unlike Batman Begins, the $135 million movie opening in 3,700 of the nation's movie theaters today, the real beginning of Batman has nothing to do with big-budget Hollywood blockbusters set in far-off monasteries. It has to do with a couple of twentysomethings in the waning days of the Great Depression, struggling to make a go of it in the comics pages at a time when, if you weren't from the planet Krypton, you were nothin'. In 1938, Bob Kane was 23, a former New York street tough - his autobiography Batman & Me talks about having his hand broken by rival gang members, and his relief at having it heal sufficiently to let him continue drawing - who honed his craft at Cooper Union and the Art Students League.
NEWS
July 20, 2008
Theater The Taming of the Shrew : 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays, through Aug. 3. Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St. $15-$25. Call 410-366-8594 or go to baltimore shakespeare.org. Talk about a Dream Team. For the Bard's classic, comic battle of the sexes, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has signed on some of the area's top acting talent. James Kinstle, the festival's former artistic director and a gifted comic actor, will play the role of the hyper-macho Petruchio.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 8, 2005
Fantastic Four is the opposite of Batman Begins -- and I mean that as a compliment. Instead of following the current chic for brooding heroes and pompous story lines, director Tim Story (Barbershop) bases this superhero extravaganza on giddy wish- fulfillment and rapscallion humor. He spins refreshing variations on the basic comic book fantasy that with one fateful push even the sorriest personality can become a glorious legend. The movie has a welcome offhand air about special effects and flights of fancy; the sequence that sets up the formation of the Fantastic Four has the same breezy shock as the outer-space opening of James Bond's You Only Live Twice.
FEATURES
July 5, 2005
LOS ANGELES - War of the Worlds conquered the box office as easily as the movie's aliens overpowered Earth, but it did not have enough firepower to overcome Hollywood's prolongued box office slump. Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise's sci-fi tale took in $77.6 million over the long Fourth of July weekend, lifting its total since debuting Wednesday to $113.3 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. That fell well short of the all-time high held by Spider-Man 2, whose $180.1 million haul in its first six days led Hollywood to a record Fourth of July weekend last year.
FEATURES
By R. Kinsey Lowe and R. Kinsey Lowe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Batman Begins swooped into theaters Wednesday with a solid $15.07 million, including just-after-midnight shows, Warner Bros. reported yesterday. While the Christopher Nolan film on which the studio has pinned hopes of resurrecting the franchise did not set any daily records - the biggest Wednesday opening belongs to Spider-Man 2 with $40.4 million - it was very good, and many in the industry expect the film's opening weekend to surpass that of the previous four Batmans. It also illustrates how much the movie business has changed as it has grown - with films opening in more theaters, delivering bigger grosses faster.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Batman begins? Hardly. Unlike Batman Begins, the $135 million movie opening in 3,700 of the nation's movie theaters today, the real beginning of Batman has nothing to do with big-budget Hollywood blockbusters set in far-off monasteries. It has to do with a couple of twentysomethings in the waning days of the Great Depression, struggling to make a go of it in the comics pages at a time when, if you weren't from the planet Krypton, you were nothin'. In 1938, Bob Kane was 23, a former New York street tough - his autobiography Batman & Me talks about having his hand broken by rival gang members, and his relief at having it heal sufficiently to let him continue drawing - who honed his craft at Cooper Union and the Art Students League.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Asledgehammer-subtle reworking of Batman's "origin" story, Batman Begins is industrial strength, from the props to the sound. It'll clear the wax out of your ears, but it won't deliver anything piquant to your brain. At a solemn 140 minutes, it tests your tailbone more often than it tickles your funny bone. Director Christopher Nolan, the accomplished yet sober-sided young director who caused an (undeserved) sensation with his jigsaw-puzzle cult thriller Memento (2001), adopts a new motto for his pre-sold blockbuster: "We will leave no viewer behind."
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 21, 2008
Harry Potter, give your Hogwarts robes a rest. Spider-Man, hang up your spidey-suit. There's a new box-office savior in town from the world of fantasy fiction, and he wears a cape and cowl. Beating the reigning champ Spider-Man 3, The Dark Knight set box-office records this weekend, bringing in a more than $155 million from the widest opening ever - 4,366 theaters. Hollywood was abuzz after opening day, when the movie set a record by raking in $67.85 million. "We knew it would be big, but we never expected to dominate the marketplace like we did," said Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 8, 2005
Fantastic Four is the opposite of Batman Begins -- and I mean that as a compliment. Instead of following the current chic for brooding heroes and pompous story lines, director Tim Story (Barbershop) bases this superhero extravaganza on giddy wish- fulfillment and rapscallion humor. He spins refreshing variations on the basic comic book fantasy that with one fateful push even the sorriest personality can become a glorious legend. The movie has a welcome offhand air about special effects and flights of fancy; the sequence that sets up the formation of the Fantastic Four has the same breezy shock as the outer-space opening of James Bond's You Only Live Twice.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - This Batmobile is for real. It was parked outside the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel the other day, looking like the mutant spawn of a Lamborghini and a Hummer with its low profile and fat monster truck tires. You could reach beyond the red velvet rope and touch it - a palpable object, at last, in a summer movie season packed with digital effects (see: Star Wars). For Batman Begins, the $150 million film that brings the Dark Knight back to the big screen tomorrow, Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - For 10 minutes, the reporters behaved. Here to interview Katie Holmes and Michael Caine, they asked dutiful questions about their new film, Batman Begins. Holmes offered the usual pat answers. "It was such a thrill to be a part of this cast," she gushed. "It was great working with Christian [Bale, as Batman]. He's such a professional and very dedicated." Oh, tell us more! Everyone, of course, really wanted to ask Holmes about her boyfriend, mega-star Tom Cruise, who has not exactly been shy about declaring his love for her. But would Holmes explode at such questions and storm out of the room?
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