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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
In the movies, Gotham City police required a giant spotlight to find Batman. Montgomery County police didn't have to go quite so far, finding him cruising around in a Lamborghini Wednesday in Silver Spring and pulling the unidentified man over for not having proper tags. The bizarre picture was posted to the department's official Twitter page today, followed by a note clarifying that the "Batmobile" wasn't towed.  Officer Janelle Smith, a police spokeswoman, said the driver is a Good Samaritan who dresses up as Batman and visits sick children at local hospitals.
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NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Date: Oct. 18 Her story: Danielle Snyder, 27, grew up in Elkton. She works in marketing at Remline Corp. in Newark, Del. Her parents, Joe and Linda Snyder, live in Cecilton. His story: Alexander "Alex" Lloyd, 27, grew up in Halethorpe. He is a former chef and works in IT at the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, or INFORMS, in Catonsville. His mother, Gina Campbell, lives in Fulton, and his father, Bruce Lloyd, lives in Eldersburg. Their story: A mutual friend introduced Danielle and Alex in 2004 during their freshman year at Villa Julie College (now Stevenson University)
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 19, 1992
The main problem with "Batman Returns" is that Batman doesn't return.Of the main characters in the $55-million film, Michael Keaton's Batman is the least dynamic, the least interesting, and the most isolated. It's a little mouse of a performance: Keaton looks boyish and unprepossessing in his Armani suits as Bruce Wayne, and as Batman, he lets the Styrofoam chest do all the acting; one can imagine this shrunken, dweebie little feller inside the rippling plastic bodymold, and it considerably deludes the illusion of omnipotence.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
Junie B. in 'Jingle Bells, Batman Smells' will be performed by Casa Manana Theater at the Amoss Center on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. Adapted from the Junie B. Jones series of books by Barbara Park, this is a musical for the whole family. Celebrate the season and sing along with the funniest first-grader around! Between taking part in the holiday pageant and picking a Secret Santa gift for her big rival Tattletale May, there's never a dull moment. Junie B. Jones will steal your heart and brighten your spirits with her lively holiday escapades.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Sunday's Ravens game at M&T Bank Stadium was briefly interrupted when a semi-nude man leaped onto the field dressed in tight Batman shorts and a cape. Mark Harvey, a 26-year-old truck driver from Severn, is no newbie when it comes to streaking: He made a similar sally onto the field at Camden Yards on the Orioles' Opening Day in April. Harvey made his move two minutes before the end of the second quarter, according to a police report. A video shot by Harvey's friends and posted to YouTube shows him jumping onto the field before heading to midfield and dancing around like a crab, then blowing kisses to the crowd.
NEWS
June 17, 1992
It's enough to make one want to invest in Spike Jones records, Nehru jackets and pet rocks.How many years did the character "Batman" lay dormant, another relic of long-lost childhoods, a bat slumbering through a generation of daylight, before Warner Bros. dusted off the comic book hero three years ago for a hit movie that reached $100 million in revenue faster than any other in history."Batman Returns" opens in theaters across the land Friday and early reviews portend even greater movie and merchandise revenues for the sequel.
NEWS
By Steven Stark | July 2, 1992
WITH "Batman Returns" on its way to grossing $100 million faster than any film in history, and Bat merchandise engulfing the nation, this is clearly the season of the Caped Crusader. To be sure, we went through much the same thing in the summer of '89, when the first Batman movie became the sixth-largest grossing film in history.In an odd way, this reincarnation of Batman has become the pop culture symbol of the Bush years -- a figure for the '90s in much the same way Rambo symbolized the '80s or James Bond the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 19, 1992
The main problem with "Batman Returns" is that Batman doesn't return.Of the main characters in the $55-million film, Michael Keaton's Batman is the least dynamic, the least interesting, and the most isolated. It's a little mouse of a performance: Keaton looks boyish and unprepossessing in his Armani suits as Bruce Wayne, and as Batman, he lets the Styrofoam chest do all the acting; one can imagine this shrunken, dweebie little feller inside the rippling plastic bodymold, and it considerably deludes the illusion of omnipotence.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
Who really made a better Joker, Cesar Romero or Jack Nicholson? Was Jim Carrey's Riddler really worth umpteen million dollars more than Frank Gorshin's? And you could debate who filled out a Catwoman suit better, Julie Newmar or Michelle Pfeiffer, for days. For those lucky enough to get the f/x cable channel, today offers the perfect opportunity to relive the days when TVs throughout the land were tuned to the same bat-channel twice a week for the adventures of the Caped Crusader and the Boy Wonder, Robin.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | June 29, 1995
"Holy high fashion, Batman!"Just in time for the smash movie "Batman Forever": Todd Oldham's fanciful clothes and Robert Lee Morris' sleek jewelry.Mr. Oldham's clothes and accessories are available in 13 Warner Bros. Studio Stores. Mr. Morris' jewelry is available in the stores and from the Warner Bros. Studio Store catalog.It's unusual for well-known clothing and jewelry designers to create collections of high-end, limited-edition fashion items that marry the designers' touch with film costume-designers' ideas.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Craig Martin jogged across the finish line, having dressed to the nines for a seven-mile run. At Saturday's Baltimore Running Festival, he ran the last leg of the relay race wearing a navy blue herringbone suit, tattersall shirt, blue-and-pink bowtie and suede shoes. In the end, his footwear did him in. "I'm going to have some bad blisters down there," said Martin, 41, of Rodgers Forge. "But I might wear this outfit in the half-marathon next year. " On a cool but muggy day, most of the 27,000 entrants stuck to shorts and T-shirts.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2013
The Pale Knight arrived ready to plunge. Inspired by last year's Batman film, "The Dark Knight Rises," Patrick Fink of Baltimore showed up at Saturday's 17th annual Polar Bear Plunge clad in a bat mask, long cape and briefs that exposed much of his pasty skin to the chill air. He even had his chest hair shorn in the shape of the Batman logo. It was the seventh time the 27-year-old from Baltimore had traveled to Sandy Point State Park for a midwinter dip in the frigid Chesapeake Bay. He said he keeps returning because the yearly event raises money for Special Olympics Maryland, "a charity I love supporting.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
The name Mark Harvey may be familiar to some. He's the guy who ran onto the field at an Orioles game as well as a Ravens game. This man is a self-absorbed idiot who brazenly sloughed of all rules of decorum while watching a sporting event ("'Batman' streaker at Orioles and Ravens games to be jailed," Dec. 19). Fans in Baltimore do not need his kind. His disruption of games while wearing a Batman-like cape and messages penned onto his body is infuriating. He says he does his shtick to get messages across to the fans.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Mark Harvey, who gained brief notoriety for running onto the field at both Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium, pleaded guilty to two trespassing counts Wednesday and received a short stay in jail. Reached by phone, Harvey, 26, said he will be able to spend Christmas and New Year's Day as a free man but will have to turn himself in Jan. 4 to serve his sentence. The stay will likely be brief: all but four days of a 180 sentence were suspended and Harvey already served two days at the time of his arrests.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Sunday's Ravens game at M&T Bank Stadium was briefly interrupted when a semi-nude man leaped onto the field dressed in tight Batman shorts and a cape. Mark Harvey, a 26-year-old truck driver from Severn, is no newbie when it comes to streaking: He made a similar sally onto the field at Camden Yards on the Orioles' Opening Day in April. Harvey made his move two minutes before the end of the second quarter, according to a police report. A video shot by Harvey's friends and posted to YouTube shows him jumping onto the field before heading to midfield and dancing around like a crab, then blowing kisses to the crowd.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
If Dan Rodricks had made an effort to meet the dog dressed as Batman at the March for the Animals, he may have encountered a highly intelligent, affectionate and fun-loving animal ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk," May 1). With dogs, as with people, discrimination and profiling is unfair and does not advance a useful dialogue. So kudos to the Maryland SPCA's Aileen Gabby and other local and national organizations who do not "distance" themselves from pit bulls, as Mr. Rodricks does.
FEATURES
By Frank Bruni and Frank Bruni,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1994
Director Joel Schumacher surveyed the expectant faces of reporters gathered around him and pledged to clear up all the rumors about why Michael Keaton left "Batman Forever.""The inside story?" Mr. Schumacher asked, then paused. "I had Tonya Harding break Michael's leg."Mr. Schumacher can be forgiven such kidding.When he signed on to direct the third "Batman" -- Tim Burton helmed the first two -- he knew he would come under scrutiny. But he had no idea how intense it would be, or how many casting crises would wrack his production.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | March 25, 1992
CHICAGO -- You've heard of potato chips? Microchips? Poker chips? Blue chips? Even cow chips?Now, compliments of a Los Angeles toy company called Street Kids and just in time for the "Batman" movie sequel, we will have Bat Chips, a corn tortilla chip in the shape of the caped crusader.The chips will be the first in a wave of licensed products that are set to debut with the movie "Batman Returns," which premieres June 19. The Warner Brothers movie stars Michael Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer and Danny DeVito.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
The choice was not between Batman and Superman. It wasn't even between the Caped Crusader and an X-person. No, it wasn't a superhero-superhero fight. Bruce Wayne's alterego just barely beat out a daytime TV talkshow host. It was either Batman undies or Ellen Degeneres-themed briefs, said Mark Harvey, the truck driver who ran out onto the field during the Orioles' opening home game. The 26-year-old Severn man originally planned to wear "ellen" undershorts for the diamond dash, Harvey said Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Despite releasing him from jail, city prosecutors still have the ability to file charges against the Severn man who interrupted the Orioles Opening Day game - but say they won't. I couldn't help but notice that at the stadium at last night's game, the lower scoreboard flashed reminders that trespassers will be "arrested and incarcerated," but didn't mention charges. It seems accurate in light of the state's attorney's office's decision-making here. In today's paper, we detailed how the Orioles were upset that Mark Harvey - the guy who ran around in a cape and Batman underwear - wasn't charged for his stunt.
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