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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
A drug dealer who was wearing a shoulder holster under his bathrobe was fatally shot in a West Baltimore alley last night after he pointed a handgun at pursuing police officers, city police said.Nathaniel M. Newkirk Jr., 28, was shot four times in the chest and abdomen about 7:30 p.m. by Officer Robert L. Smith, an undercover officer in the Southwestern District's drug enforcement unit, police said.City police spokesman Dennis Hill said police pursued Newkirk after five plainclothes narcotics officers saw him selling heroin to a man at Winchester and Poplar Grove streets moments earlier.
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FEATURES
July 21, 2007
The boy wizard's seventh and final adventure, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, is finally ready to read, but the party doesn't have to end with last night's midnight release festivities. Kids can still dress the part for book clubs, Potter-themed birthday parties or even just a wizards' duel in the backyard. Unlike other childhood heroes (think Transformers), it's easy and inexpensive to create your own Potter costume. And most of the supplies can be found around the house. What you need to be Harry Potter Materials Dark-colored flat sheet or another garment that can fill in as a robe 1 piece of black foam board Lipstick or face paint Glitter Glue Scissors An unsharpened pencil Craft paint Masking tape Safety pin DIRECTIONS Wand Paint an unsharpened pencil to create Harry's all-important wand.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
A drug dealer who was wearing a shoulder holster under his bathrobe was fatally shot in a West Baltimore alley last night after he pointed a handgun at pursuing police officers, city police said.Nathaniel M. Newkirk Jr., 28, was shot four times in the chest and abdomen about 7:30 p.m. by Officer Robert L. Smith, an undercover officer in the Southwestern District's drug enforcement unit, police said.City police spokesman Dennis Hill said police pursued Newkirk after five plainclothes narcotics officers saw him selling heroin to man at Winchester and Poplar Grove streets moments earlier.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 29, 2005
I went online and unearthed an old Under Armour commercial, featuring Ralph Friedgen and the University of Maryland. It ends with a player barking, "We must protect this house!" You didn't hear that much this year, did you? And the Terps, they didn't do that much last year, either. Protect the house? They treated the place like a time-share and routinely allowed visitors to get a bit too cozy. (I still swear I saw Frank Beamer wearing Friedgen's bathrobe a few weeks back.) Maryland finished 1-4 at Byrd Stadium, en route to its second straight 5-6 season.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 18, 1991
I was sitting at the breakfast table clad in a bathrobe the other morning when a thought flashed through my groggy brain. This was a chance to fix the pencil sharpener.It was early, I was half-dressed and only half way through my coffee. But I knew I had to act. This was a segment of uninterrupted time. A chance to actually get something done.They are rare. I liken these occasions to launching a satellite. There are only certain windows of opportunity. If you don't act when you have the chance, you have to wait days, sometimes weeks, to get another shot.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold yesterday gave probation to a Sykesville man who admitted sexually abusing his stepdaughters.The suspended, two-year sentence, with five years of supervised probation, was imposed after the man's two stepdaughters pleaded with the judge to keep the defendant out of jail."
FEATURES
July 21, 2007
The boy wizard's seventh and final adventure, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, is finally ready to read, but the party doesn't have to end with last night's midnight release festivities. Kids can still dress the part for book clubs, Potter-themed birthday parties or even just a wizards' duel in the backyard. Unlike other childhood heroes (think Transformers), it's easy and inexpensive to create your own Potter costume. And most of the supplies can be found around the house. What you need to be Harry Potter Materials Dark-colored flat sheet or another garment that can fill in as a robe 1 piece of black foam board Lipstick or face paint Glitter Glue Scissors An unsharpened pencil Craft paint Masking tape Safety pin DIRECTIONS Wand Paint an unsharpened pencil to create Harry's all-important wand.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2001
A day after he claimed a double-barreled victory in Baltimore's federal court, G. Gordon Liddy came out blazing. "What a sweet day it is," the Watergate conspirator boomed on his radio talk show yesterday - the morning after a federal judge threw out a $5.1 million defamation lawsuit against him and a jury showed sympathy for his fringe theory that sex, not politics, was behind the burglary. "You just can't get better than that," said Liddy, who started his show with the sound of strafing gunfire and the pronouncement: "We have once again shot down John Dean."
NEWS
By Helen Lester | December 27, 2000
Editor's note: A case of mistaken identity works out for the best. As the sun set on the iceberg, Goodly, Lovely, Angel, Neatly, Perfect and Tacky were telling penguin jokes. "Why did the Penguin cross the road?" asked Goodly. "Why?" asked his companions. "He didn't." Lovely, Angel, Neatly and Perfect laughed uproariously. "How many penguins does it take to change a light bulb?" asked Lovely. Before anyone could answer, a messenger swooped down and dropped a note. The note read: THE EMPEROR IS COMING TO VISIT.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 16, 1994
Many people, as you know, are depressed around the holidays. Most of them, of course, are husbands.You see these poor creatures on Christmas Eve. They have no glad tidings. They have no Christmas cheer (all right, maybe just a belt or two for their nerves before they hit the mall). What they do have is that desperate look found only in deer at the wrong end of a headlight and men who haven't yet found a present for their wives.Men try. Well, they try for a while.If you're out shopping, you will see young guys (if they're older, it's a second marriage, or there's somebody on the side)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 3, 2001
He's got a new member on his crew who wants to kill him, federal agents crawling around his basement trying to plant a listening device, a mother who might testify against him in a racketeering case, and a war among his hot-headed soldiers over garbage hauling contracts that's making headlines on the front page of the Newark Star-Ledger. Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), the middle-aged New Jersey crime boss, can handle all of that. What he can't handle is coming downstairs one morning in his bathrobe to find his daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler)
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2001
A day after he claimed a double-barreled victory in Baltimore's federal court, G. Gordon Liddy came out blazing. "What a sweet day it is," the Watergate conspirator boomed on his radio talk show yesterday - the morning after a federal judge threw out a $5.1 million defamation lawsuit against him and a jury showed sympathy for his fringe theory that sex, not politics, was behind the burglary. "You just can't get better than that," said Liddy, who started his show with the sound of strafing gunfire and the pronouncement: "We have once again shot down John Dean."
NEWS
By Helen Lester | December 27, 2000
Editor's note: A case of mistaken identity works out for the best. As the sun set on the iceberg, Goodly, Lovely, Angel, Neatly, Perfect and Tacky were telling penguin jokes. "Why did the Penguin cross the road?" asked Goodly. "Why?" asked his companions. "He didn't." Lovely, Angel, Neatly and Perfect laughed uproariously. "How many penguins does it take to change a light bulb?" asked Lovely. Before anyone could answer, a messenger swooped down and dropped a note. The note read: THE EMPEROR IS COMING TO VISIT.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 27, 1997
TODAY, THE LAST Saturday of the year, is one of my favorite days. It is low-expectation Saturday, a day when nobody is supposed to get much done around the house.Today's slack domestic pace is a reaction to the heavy workload of previous Saturdays. In most homes, the Saturdays leading up to this one were devoted to frenzied attempts to get the house ready for the holidays. Basements were cleaned, walls were painted, rooms were decorated. All these tasks had to be completed before "the start of the holiday season," a time when your home is invaded by friends, partygoers and relatives.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 1997
NEW YORK -- The tales from the witness stand, of blood oaths and double-crosses and murders and more murders, are familiar, even stale. The real show on the sixth floor of Brooklyn's federal courthouse is the elderly, wheelchair-bound man who stares at the ceiling and mumbles quietly to no one but himself.Vincent Gigante might be the murderous boss of a notorious Mafia crime family, a man whom mobsters refer to with a quick rub of their chins. Or he might be a nutty old man. Or both.For now, every move the alleged Genovese crime family boss makes, every blank expression, is under scrutiny here in one of the strangest Mafia trials.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 16, 1994
Many people, as you know, are depressed around the holidays. Most of them, of course, are husbands.You see these poor creatures on Christmas Eve. They have no glad tidings. They have no Christmas cheer (all right, maybe just a belt or two for their nerves before they hit the mall). What they do have is that desperate look found only in deer at the wrong end of a headlight and men who haven't yet found a present for their wives.Men try. Well, they try for a while.If you're out shopping, you will see young guys (if they're older, it's a second marriage, or there's somebody on the side)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 9, 1991
How many times have you wanted to tell your boss exactl what you think of him? Or, to take it one step further and physicalize your feelings?An elaborate revenge fantasy is the most satisfying scene in Gregory Jenkins' "Outside the Norm," an otherwise unexceptional comedy of the feel-good variety, currently at the Spotlighters as part of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.In a vivid daydream, an out-of-work advertising copywriter named Norm (Barry Price) conjures up the duplicitous boss who forced him to resign.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 3, 2001
He's got a new member on his crew who wants to kill him, federal agents crawling around his basement trying to plant a listening device, a mother who might testify against him in a racketeering case, and a war among his hot-headed soldiers over garbage hauling contracts that's making headlines on the front page of the Newark Star-Ledger. Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini), the middle-aged New Jersey crime boss, can handle all of that. What he can't handle is coming downstairs one morning in his bathrobe to find his daughter, Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler)
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold yesterday gave probation to a Sykesville man who admitted sexually abusing his stepdaughters.The suspended, two-year sentence, with five years of supervised probation, was imposed after the man's two stepdaughters pleaded with the judge to keep the defendant out of jail."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 9, 1991
How many times have you wanted to tell your boss exactl what you think of him? Or, to take it one step further and physicalize your feelings?An elaborate revenge fantasy is the most satisfying scene in Gregory Jenkins' "Outside the Norm," an otherwise unexceptional comedy of the feel-good variety, currently at the Spotlighters as part of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.In a vivid daydream, an out-of-work advertising copywriter named Norm (Barry Price) conjures up the duplicitous boss who forced him to resign.
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