Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBath Salts
IN THE NEWS

Bath Salts

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Five substances known as "bath salts" were added to the list of Schedule 1 Controlled Dangerous Substances list in Maryland through emergency regulations Tuesday. The move codified an order issued this summer by Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, whose office had conducted a study and determined that the synthetic substances aren't yet widely available in Maryland but they could become a threat to health here. Sharfstein said the move gives law enforcement more power to enforce the earlier ban on bath salts, which can be inhaled, ingested, smoked or injected and can cause cardiac and circulatory problems as well as paranoia and psychosis for days or weeks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon, a Baltimore minister and activist, has been scoping out convenience stores that sell products such as "Scooby Snax. " The glossy package features a picture of a dazed-looking cartoon character, Scooby Doo. A sticker advises that the contents have a blueberry flavor, though the package contains dried herbs, not candy. The minister's mission has been to get such products out of the hands of Baltimore's youth, who are smoking the stuff in hopes of getting high.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
Maryland health authorities have launched an investigation that could lead to a statewide ban on the sale or possession of synthetic stimulant drugs being marketed as "bath salts. " The probe is expected to last a month, followed by a decision on whether to add them to the state's list of "Schedule 1" controlled dangerous substances. In the meantime, "Marylanders should avoid these 'bath salts' products," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
A program discussing the growing use of synthetic drugs will be held Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m., at the Westminster Library, 50 E. Main St., Westminster The program is for adults, and will discuss the dangers of bath salts, Spice, K2, and other synthetic drugs. Charles Bosley, addictions coordinator at Carroll Hospital Center, will discuss the effects of synthetic drugs on the body, the warning signs of use, and how to talk to teens about these and other drugs. The talk is free.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Public health authorities in Maryland are moving to impose a ban, starting as early as Sept. 1, on the sale of synthetic drugs known as "bath salts. " After a six-week inquiry, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, on Thursday declared the drugs "dangerous" and asked for emergency regulations to add them to the state's Schedule 1 Controlled Dangerous Substances list. DHMH investigators also found that, while the drugs are dangerous, their availability in Maryland is "low.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
A program discussing the growing use of synthetic drugs will be held Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m., at the Westminster Library, 50 E. Main St., Westminster The program is for adults, and will discuss the dangers of bath salts, Spice, K2, and other synthetic drugs. Charles Bosley, addictions coordinator at Carroll Hospital Center, will discuss the effects of synthetic drugs on the body, the warning signs of use, and how to talk to teens about these and other drugs. The talk is free.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
According to reader Sandra Klisham, we need less newspaper coverage about the Morgan State University student accused of cannibalism and more about the U.S. soldiers who are fighting and dying in Afghanistan ("Less cannibalism coverage," June 8). She couldn't be more wrong. The reported episodes of cannibalism are just the tip of the iceberg in a society where a lot of people, including those in the military, are searching for the next best high. And It appears recent reports of cannibalism may not be isolated episodes.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Cortly "C.D. " Witherspoon, a Baltimore minister and activist, has been scoping out convenience stores that sell products such as "Scooby Snax. " The glossy package features a picture of a dazed-looking cartoon character, Scooby Doo. A sticker advises that the contents have a blueberry flavor, though the package contains dried herbs, not candy. The minister's mission has been to get such products out of the hands of Baltimore's youth, who are smoking the stuff in hopes of getting high.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | February 23, 2003
Toting lipstick around in a big ol' handbag leads to heartache, or at least to misplaced lipstick. Prada's solution is a kicky red satin drawstring bag for $95, designed to hold just two weeks' worth of lip-care products. The company's Lip Treat and Finish accessory bag comes filled with Shielding Cream SPF12 / Lip, two #6 red Shielding Balms and two #7 pink Shielding Balms. When the Prada goodies are gone, you can fill the bag with Blistex. The Prada Lip Treat and Finish bag is available at www. neimanmarcus.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2005
Open 'Gate' to skin care The January wind blows and your skin gets chapped and dry. Add to that the dry air in the office and you've got problems. Add back lost moisture with a bath steeped with salts and foams from Davies Gate. Its Oatmeal and Rice Bath Salts ($16) make a spa treatment out of an ordinary bath. Finely ground oats and rice flour soothe and soften skin, and antioxidant vitamins A, D and E heal and protect dry skin. Davies Gate Sesame Seed Bath Foam ($20) hydrates and conditions skin with sesame seed oil. Aloe vera and cucumber.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
According to reader Sandra Klisham, we need less newspaper coverage about the Morgan State University student accused of cannibalism and more about the U.S. soldiers who are fighting and dying in Afghanistan ("Less cannibalism coverage," June 8). She couldn't be more wrong. The reported episodes of cannibalism are just the tip of the iceberg in a society where a lot of people, including those in the military, are searching for the next best high. And It appears recent reports of cannibalism may not be isolated episodes.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
Five substances known as "bath salts" were added to the list of Schedule 1 Controlled Dangerous Substances list in Maryland through emergency regulations Tuesday. The move codified an order issued this summer by Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, whose office had conducted a study and determined that the synthetic substances aren't yet widely available in Maryland but they could become a threat to health here. Sharfstein said the move gives law enforcement more power to enforce the earlier ban on bath salts, which can be inhaled, ingested, smoked or injected and can cause cardiac and circulatory problems as well as paranoia and psychosis for days or weeks.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Public health authorities in Maryland are moving to impose a ban, starting as early as Sept. 1, on the sale of synthetic drugs known as "bath salts. " After a six-week inquiry, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, on Thursday declared the drugs "dangerous" and asked for emergency regulations to add them to the state's Schedule 1 Controlled Dangerous Substances list. DHMH investigators also found that, while the drugs are dangerous, their availability in Maryland is "low.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2011
Maryland health authorities have launched an investigation that could lead to a statewide ban on the sale or possession of synthetic stimulant drugs being marketed as "bath salts. " The probe is expected to last a month, followed by a decision on whether to add them to the state's list of "Schedule 1" controlled dangerous substances. In the meantime, "Marylanders should avoid these 'bath salts' products," said Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
— The storage facility just past the quaint frame houses and antiques shops pressed against this town's Main Street held more than furniture and heirlooms that could no longer fit into people homes. Authorities say Unit 3019, steps from the main office, was being used to package the latest fad in designer narcotics — synthetic drugs sold as benign bath salts and herbal potpourri, with names such as "Snowblind Bath Salts," "Zombie World" and "Dark Night Sampler. " A recent arrest in Howard County led federal drug agents to the town this month.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2005
Open 'Gate' to skin care The January wind blows and your skin gets chapped and dry. Add to that the dry air in the office and you've got problems. Add back lost moisture with a bath steeped with salts and foams from Davies Gate. Its Oatmeal and Rice Bath Salts ($16) make a spa treatment out of an ordinary bath. Finely ground oats and rice flour soothe and soften skin, and antioxidant vitamins A, D and E heal and protect dry skin. Davies Gate Sesame Seed Bath Foam ($20) hydrates and conditions skin with sesame seed oil. Aloe vera and cucumber.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | December 30, 2001
Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all? Apparently Catherine Zeta-Jones. Of all the famous female faces, hers was picked as the ideal feminine mug by facial plastic surgeons surveyed by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Nicole Kidman came in second and Jennifer Aniston, Penelope Cruz and Gwyneth Paltrow tied for third. Mel Gibson took the title of best masculine face, followed by George Clooney and Harrison Ford. "While beauty may be in the eye of the beholder," says Shan Baker, AAFPRS president, "there's a real mathematical equation for measuring a person's attractiveness.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | April 6, 1997
I ASSUME THAT WHEN my great-grandfather moved into a brand new house on Guilford Avenue, he knew what he was doing. With a wife, her mother, five daughters and two sons, he bought big. The house had six bedrooms, long halls and stairways, and one bathroom.In later years, a second bath was added in the cellar, but that plumbing was used chiefly by our Labrador retriever, who liked a cool drink of water a couple times a day.Visitors to that house were often struck that such a large household of people had but a solitary upstairs bath.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | February 23, 2003
Toting lipstick around in a big ol' handbag leads to heartache, or at least to misplaced lipstick. Prada's solution is a kicky red satin drawstring bag for $95, designed to hold just two weeks' worth of lip-care products. The company's Lip Treat and Finish accessory bag comes filled with Shielding Cream SPF12 / Lip, two #6 red Shielding Balms and two #7 pink Shielding Balms. When the Prada goodies are gone, you can fill the bag with Blistex. The Prada Lip Treat and Finish bag is available at www. neimanmarcus.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | December 30, 2001
Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the fairest of them all? Apparently Catherine Zeta-Jones. Of all the famous female faces, hers was picked as the ideal feminine mug by facial plastic surgeons surveyed by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Nicole Kidman came in second and Jennifer Aniston, Penelope Cruz and Gwyneth Paltrow tied for third. Mel Gibson took the title of best masculine face, followed by George Clooney and Harrison Ford. "While beauty may be in the eye of the beholder," says Shan Baker, AAFPRS president, "there's a real mathematical equation for measuring a person's attractiveness.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.