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Bataan Death March

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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1992
The calendar says it was 50 years ago. But to Allen Beauchamp, Al Bland and Mike McMullen, it's just like yesterday. Vivid images of the atrocities and horrors they witnessed and endured in 1942 still sear their memories.These Marylanders, and hundreds like them in the country, are among the "Battling Bastards of Bataan: No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam," survivors of America's darkest days in World War II, the fall of the Philippines after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.Their ordeal began April 9, 1942, when the besieged U.S. and Filipino troops on the Bataan Peninsula surrendered.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Louis Sachwald, who spent 42 months as a prisoner of war during World War II after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines and survived slave labor camps, forced marches and "hell" ships, died Feb. 28 of dementia at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Southern Maryland. The former Pikesville resident was 92. Mr. Sachwald was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved in 1934 with his family to Lancaster, Pa. After graduating from McCaskey High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940 from Millersville State Teachers College.
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NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2006
All Things, All at Once Lee K. Abbott Voodoo Heart Scott Snyder Dial Press / 288 pages / $24 This review begins with a disclaimer: I'm in love with short stories. I love reading them, writing them and teaching about reading and writing them. I'm passionate about short stories in the classroom, tell my students that the short story is the perfect literary form: manageable yet memorable. Short stories require limited time commitment (even to write), yet they are sometimes far more mesmerizing than a novel.
NEWS
By VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2006
All Things, All at Once Lee K. Abbott Voodoo Heart Scott Snyder Dial Press / 288 pages / $24 This review begins with a disclaimer: I'm in love with short stories. I love reading them, writing them and teaching about reading and writing them. I'm passionate about short stories in the classroom, tell my students that the short story is the perfect literary form: manageable yet memorable. Short stories require limited time commitment (even to write), yet they are sometimes far more mesmerizing than a novel.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
Louis Sachwald, who spent 42 months as a prisoner of war during World War II after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines and survived slave labor camps, forced marches and "hell" ships, died Feb. 28 of dementia at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Southern Maryland. The former Pikesville resident was 92. Mr. Sachwald was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved in 1934 with his family to Lancaster, Pa. After graduating from McCaskey High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940 from Millersville State Teachers College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
Albert J. Bland, a World War II prisoner of war and survivor of the infamous Bataan Death March, died of cancer Wednesday at the Perry Point Veterans Affairs Hospital. He was 87. Mr. Bland was born in Toronto and raised in Egg Harbor, N.J. He was an outstanding high school athlete and played football - as a formidable 240-pound tackle - while attending Washington College in the early 1930s. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1937, and was serving as a mechanic at Nichols Field in the Philippines during the early days of World War II. Out of food, ammunition and medical supplies, and overwhelmed by superior Japanese forces, American and Filipino troops defending the Bataan Peninsula surrendered April 9, 1942.
TOPIC
By Carmen Amedori | August 20, 2000
My 76-year-old father's voice resonated through the telephone. "Damn it. Throughout the years, this has always stuck in my craw as much as the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor." War is hell and no one knows it better than those who have survived to chronicle the events. My dad, to whom I am namesake, served in Europe during World War II. He was 20 years old at the time -- a babe thrown into combat while my mother waited at home with the first of their five children for his return. Growing up, it was rare to hear a combat story from my dad. But early on this July morning, his anger was apparent.
NEWS
April 25, 1997
Henry A. Mucci,88, an Army colonel who led the raid that rescued survivors of the Bataan Death March during World War II, died Sunday in Melbourne, Fla.He headed the January 1945 mission that freed 511 men. Most of them were American soldiers who had endured brutal confinement in the Japanese prison camp at Cabanatuan in the Philippines for nearly three years.Pub Date: 4/25/97
NEWS
February 17, 2005
On February 15, 2005, WILLIAM F., SR., beloved husband of the late Bernadine (nee Schweiger), loving father of William, Jr., Raymond E., Sr., Joann Southerly and Kathleen Rosier. Also survived by eight grandchildren, five step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. During his military service, he survived the Bataan Death March and was held by the Japanese as a P.O.W. for three years. Visitation to take place at Kaczorowski Funeral Home, P.A., 1201 Dundalk Ave., from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass at St. Rita's Church on Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment to follow at Sacred Heart of Jesus Cemetery.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
Franklin A. Burchill, a retired Baltimore County public school custodian and school bus attendant who was active in VFW affairs and walked the trail of World War II's infamous Bataan Death March -- which his brother survived -- died of liver cancer May 12 at Sinai Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 70. Mr. Burchill was born and raised in Frackville, Pa. He served with an Army artillery unit in Germany from 1953 to 1959, then was a construction worker until becoming a custodian in 1979.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2003
Albert J. Bland, a World War II prisoner of war and survivor of the infamous Bataan Death March, died of cancer Wednesday at the Perry Point Veterans Affairs Hospital. He was 87. Mr. Bland was born in Toronto and raised in Egg Harbor, N.J. He was an outstanding high school athlete and played football - as a formidable 240-pound tackle - while attending Washington College in the early 1930s. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1937, and was serving as a mechanic at Nichols Field in the Philippines during the early days of World War II. Out of food, ammunition and medical supplies, and overwhelmed by superior Japanese forces, American and Filipino troops defending the Bataan Peninsula surrendered April 9, 1942.
TOPIC
By Carmen Amedori | August 20, 2000
My 76-year-old father's voice resonated through the telephone. "Damn it. Throughout the years, this has always stuck in my craw as much as the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor." War is hell and no one knows it better than those who have survived to chronicle the events. My dad, to whom I am namesake, served in Europe during World War II. He was 20 years old at the time -- a babe thrown into combat while my mother waited at home with the first of their five children for his return. Growing up, it was rare to hear a combat story from my dad. But early on this July morning, his anger was apparent.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1992
The calendar says it was 50 years ago. But to Allen Beauchamp, Al Bland and Mike McMullen, it's just like yesterday. Vivid images of the atrocities and horrors they witnessed and endured in 1942 still sear their memories.These Marylanders, and hundreds like them in the country, are among the "Battling Bastards of Bataan: No Mama, No Papa, No Uncle Sam," survivors of America's darkest days in World War II, the fall of the Philippines after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.Their ordeal began April 9, 1942, when the besieged U.S. and Filipino troops on the Bataan Peninsula surrendered.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
Allen Vern Beauchamp, a retired packing company executive and a World War II veteran who survived the Bataan Death March in the Philippines, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Stella Maris nursing home in Timonium. He was 86 and lived in Timonium. Born in Detroit, Mr. Beauchamp graduated from high school in the late 1930s. He joined the Marines soon after finishing high school. Mr. Beauchamp was captured by the Japanese in the Philippines in 1942 and was forced to march to a prison camp about 100 miles away.
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