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By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
Bell Container Co. has been fined $100,000 for paying kickbacks on defense contracts to a former purchasing manager at Belcamp, Md.-based Bata Shoe Co.Richard Brateman, Bell Container's vice president, accepted the fine on behalf of the Newark, N.J., box-maker at a sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Brateman, on authorization from Bell Container's board of directors, had pleaded guilty on behalf of the company in January to one count of violating the federal Anti-Kickback Act. The fine was recommended by the government in the company's plea bargain.
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NEWS
June 9, 2007
The man convicted of the execution-style double-slaying of two Baltimore nightclub employees was sentenced yesterday to 60 years in prison - the maximum amount of time he could have received for two counts of second-degree murder. On April 16, 2003, Anthony Jerome Miller, 31, fatally shot Jason M. Convertino, 31, and Sean M. Wisniewski, 22, in a Fells Point apartment in the 1900 block of Gough St. The two men were promoters who had worked for Redwood Trust in downtown Baltimore. A city jury acquitted Miller, of the 4500 block of Runnymeade Road in Owings Mills, of first-degree murder charges but convicted him of second-degree murder.
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NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
When Lillian Sonberg and other Czechoslovakians were recruited 65 years ago to teach Marylanders how to make Bata shoes at the company's Belcamp plant, farmland along U.S. 40 stretched to the horizon. It was 1939, a time when people left their doors unlocked and placed money on the dining table for the milkman to pick up Friday mornings. Now the Bata plant - once the largest private employer in Harford County - is just about demolished. The last remnant of Bata's existence ---- a five-story building used for assembling parts ---- was bought by Clark Turner Cos. last week for part of its Water's Edge development, a $150 million luxury waterfront community on 200 acres along the Bush River.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
Everybody loves a good demolition. People pulled their kids out of school, offices shut down, police closed the roads and at least one company planned a party, all as part of a 13-second event yesterday on U.S. 40 in Belcamp: the demolition of the 65-year-old former Bata Shoe factory that was once Harford County's largest employer. "Everybody would like to blow something up," said Kevin Klass, the project manager in charge of the show. His northern Baltimore County company, Controlled Demolition Inc., has blown up structures from the Kingdome stadium in Seattle to remains of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 2, 1990
Two former employees of Bata Shoe Co. in Belcamp were charged Thursday in federal court in a kickback scheme related to a $4.8 million contract for cold-weather military boots.Zdenek Formanek, 71, of Aberdeen, a former Bata purchasing agent, was indicted by a federal grand jury on suspicion of violating the 1986 Anti-Kickback Law.The indictment specifically charges Formanek -- who left Bata in 1982 to work for one of Bata's suppliers -- with paying kickbacks between 1985 and 1989 to Alvin Greininger, who succeeded Formanek as Bata's purchasing agent.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
A former Bata Shoe Co. purchasing agent pleaded guilty today to a federal felony count of soliciting and accepting kickbacks from suppliers on a Defense Department boot contract.Bell Container Corp., of Newark, N.J., and Kurt Faulhammer, 49, owner and president of K&R Fabrics, in Wilbraham, Mass., also pleaded guilty today to felony charges of paying kickbacks to the purchasing agent, Alvin Grieninger, 58, of Havre de Grace, in return for orders for boxes and fleece that Bata used to make and ship cold-weather boots to the military.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2000
A $150 million waterfront complex featuring high-tech offices, upscale housing, restaurants and a hotel is transforming a section of Harford County's rust belt - the grimy, commercial stretch of U.S. 40 from the Gunpowder to the Susquehanna rivers. Water's Edge has started to take shape on 200 acres along the Bush River in Belcamp. The ambitious project, being developed by Clark Turner of Clark Turner Cos. in Bel Air, complements Harford County Executive James M. Harkins' plans to rehabilitate the corridor, where dilapidated shopping centers and defunct gas stations cast a pall along the thoroughfare.
NEWS
June 4, 1995
Frank G. NovakIndustrial relations chiefFrank G. Novak, retired industrial relations manager for Bata Shoe Co., died May 25 of cancer at the Stella Maris Hospice. He was 83 and had lived in Aberdeen since 1977.Mr. Novak was one of Bata's first employees when he started working for the Harford County company in 1940. In more than three decades with Bata, he oversaw expansion of the Belcamp-based company and the development of branch operations in Baltimore, Delaware, Indiana and West Virginia.
NEWS
June 9, 2007
The man convicted of the execution-style double-slaying of two Baltimore nightclub employees was sentenced yesterday to 60 years in prison - the maximum amount of time he could have received for two counts of second-degree murder. On April 16, 2003, Anthony Jerome Miller, 31, fatally shot Jason M. Convertino, 31, and Sean M. Wisniewski, 22, in a Fells Point apartment in the 1900 block of Gough St. The two men were promoters who had worked for Redwood Trust in downtown Baltimore. A city jury acquitted Miller, of the 4500 block of Runnymeade Road in Owings Mills, of first-degree murder charges but convicted him of second-degree murder.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | March 14, 1996
Baltimoreans who zip up to New York for a weekend often package theater, dining and shopping. Here's a suggestion for the style- and budget-minded: Look, don't shop. A taste for fashion can be satisfied with specialized collections in the city's museums. A sample of clothes and trimmings to be seen in weeks to come:THE MUSEUM OF THE FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Seventh Avenue and 27th Street. Hours: Noon to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Free. (212) 760-7642.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
When Lillian Sonberg and other Czechoslovakians were recruited 65 years ago to teach Marylanders how to make Bata shoes at the company's Belcamp plant, farmland along U.S. 40 stretched to the horizon. It was 1939, a time when people left their doors unlocked and placed money on the dining table for the milkman to pick up Friday mornings. Now the Bata plant - once the largest private employer in Harford County - is just about demolished. The last remnant of Bata's existence ---- a five-story building used for assembling parts ---- was bought by Clark Turner Cos. last week for part of its Water's Edge development, a $150 million luxury waterfront community on 200 acres along the Bush River.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
A local private investment company said yesterday that it is near completion of a deal to purchase Bata Shoe Co. Inc. in Harford County for an undisclosed amount. Ramer Equities Inc., which has offices in Baltimore and Los Angeles, plans to buy Bata, change the corporate name and move the company to quarters to be built in Havre de Grace. Bata's management and 140 employees would continue with the company. The new name would be Onguard Industries LLC. Bata's sales come from making protective rubber and plastic footwear.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2000
A $150 million waterfront complex featuring high-tech offices, upscale housing, restaurants and a hotel is transforming a section of Harford County's rust belt - the grimy, commercial stretch of U.S. 40 from the Gunpowder to the Susquehanna rivers. Water's Edge has started to take shape on 200 acres along the Bush River in Belcamp. The ambitious project, being developed by Clark Turner of Clark Turner Cos. in Bel Air, complements Harford County Executive James M. Harkins' plans to rehabilitate the corridor, where dilapidated shopping centers and defunct gas stations cast a pall along the thoroughfare.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1999
With a series of explosions, amid billows of dust, a piece of Harford County history came crashing to the ground yesterday.The Bata Hotel -- once the home to hundreds of workers at the landmark Bata Shoe Co. plant -- was imploded to make room for a planned $63 million office park."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
In the first major component of a planned high-technology business corridor along U.S. 40 in Harford County, the Bata Shoe Co. plant will be razed this year to make way for a $63 million office park, county officials announced yesterday.The proposed Water's Edge Corporate Campus on the banks of the Bush River -- which officials hope will draw 1,300 jobs to the county -- will join a community of 400 homes, two waterfront restaurants and a hotel and conference center being built in the area.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
It's hard to say why these freakishly tiny shoes, nestled in a cardboard box, survived. Perhaps the exquisite green and red silk Chinese slippers, three and a half inches long and likely made by a woman for her own bound feet, were a family keepsake. Perhaps they were benignly neglected, then rediscovered by someone who treasures finely made old things.In either case, it is fortunate for the balding Danish podiatrist snapping photos at the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine's Shoe Museum that the pair survived.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
It's hard to say why these freakishly tiny shoes, nestled in a cardboard box, survived. Perhaps the exquisite green and red silk Chinese slippers, three and a half inches long and likely made by a woman for her own bound feet, were a family keepsake. Perhaps they were benignly neglected, then rediscovered by someone who treasures finely made old things.In either case, it is fortunate for the balding Danish podiatrist snapping photos at the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine's Shoe Museum that the pair survived.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | March 14, 1996
Baltimoreans who zip up to New York for a weekend often package theater, dining and shopping. Here's a suggestion for the style- and budget-minded: Look, don't shop. A taste for fashion can be satisfied with specialized collections in the city's museums. A sample of clothes and trimmings to be seen in weeks to come:THE MUSEUM OF THE FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Seventh Avenue and 27th Street. Hours: Noon to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Free. (212) 760-7642.
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